Hubble Captures ‘Gravitational Tug-of-War’ Between Three Galaxies

NASA has published a spectacular image that was photographed by the Hubble Space Telescope that shows what the space organization describes as a three-way tug-of-war between interacting galaxies. Hubble captured the dramatic triplet of galaxies — which is known as Arp 195 — and is featured in the Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies, which is a […]

Hubble Captures ‘Gravitational Tug-of-War’ Between Three Galaxies

NASA has published a spectacular image that was photographed by the Hubble Space Telescope that shows what the space organization describes as a three-way tug-of-war between interacting galaxies.

Hubble captured the dramatic triplet of galaxies — which is known as Arp 195 — and is featured in the Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies, which is a list that shows some of the stranger and weirder, though no less wonderful, galaxies in the universe.

That Atlas was written by Halton Arp and published by the California Institute of Technology in 1966 and contains a total of 338 galaxies. The entire purpose of the Atlas was to show photographs of different kinds of odd or unusual structures found in galaxies in the universe. While there are many photos of unique galaxies found in that Atlas, this latest photo shows Arp 195, which is located in the Lynx constellation about 747 million light-years from Earth.

Hubble’s team originally posted the black and white version of the photo on July 19 which was featured as part of the celebration of the satellite’s return to full functionality after it went offline for over a month due to a software error. On June 13, 2021, Hubble went offline due to a glitch in its payload computer and NASA’s team spent weeks attempting to fix it. The error almost took down the legendary satellite for good, but scientists were able to bring Hubble back from the brink on July 16.

Observing time with Hubble is extremely valuable, so astronomers don’t want to waste a second. The schedule for Hubble observations is calculated using a computer algorithm which allows the spacecraft to occasionally gather bonus snapshots of data between longer observations. This image of the clashing triplet of galaxies in Arp 195 is one such snapshot. Extra observations such as these do more than provide spectacular images – they also help to identify promising targets to follow up with using telescopes such as the upcoming NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope.


Image credits: ESA/Hubble & NASA, J. Dalcanton

Source : Peta Pixel More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

Photos Contain ‘Layers of Mind’, Study Finds

Photographs contain “layers of mind.” That’s according to a new study, which found that people are considered to be “less real” and have “less mind” when they’re seen in photos of photos rather than photos themselves. The study was led by psychology professor Dr. Alan Kingstone of the University of British Columbia in Canada, and […]

Photos Contain ‘Layers of Mind’, Study Finds

Photographs contain “layers of mind.” That’s according to a new study, which found that people are considered to be “less real” and have “less mind” when they’re seen in photos of photos rather than photos themselves.

The study was led by psychology professor Dr. Alan Kingstone of the University of British Columbia in Canada, and it was published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

According to researchers, these layers in photographs have never been noticed by scientists before.

“Pictures have been part of human culture for thousands of years,” Kingstone states in a press release by UBC. “The idea that we can discover something new about them at this stage is really exciting. We found that pictures contain layers of mind.”

Researchers analyzed how people perceived the people they saw in photos, both people directly captured by a camera as well as people seen in photos or posters within a photograph.

“For example, suppose you are standing next to a poster of your face, and someone takes your photo,” Kingstone says. “The new photo contains your face twice—once in the poster and once beside it.

“Both faces are just different regions of the same photo, but people perceive the photo within the poster as being more removed from reality and having less capacity to experience feelings or make plans.”

Just as a person in a photograph feels less real than a person in real life, a person in a photo of a photo feels less real than a person in a photo (and a person in a photo of a photo of a photo feels less real than a person in a photo of a photo) — it’s layers of mind all the way down.

Before you dismiss the research as having no real-world significance, get this: the scientists found that these layers affect peoples’ behavior and decisions.

“We also found that people would give a person within an image less consideration and attention,” says study co-author Dr. Rob Jenkins of England’s University of York. “In our experiments, participants donated the least money to a person in a photo of a photo.”

The findings are also relevant to more and more of our lives being moved online, through things like social media photo sharing and videoconferencing. And because “mind perception” is foundational in how humans make moral judgments, when someone’s mind is perceived in a lesser way, that person will likely be judged in a lesser way as well.

“There are many professional situations that involve pictures of people,” Jenkins says. “When these activities are moved online, the pictures become one step further removed from reality.

“For example, during a virtual trial, a judge may see pictures of a victim on video. Our findings suggest the judge may be less inclined to view the victim as real and vivid, which could affect how the case unfolds.”

In addition to courtrooms, everything from business meetings to healthcare visits to classrooms has moved to videoconferencing, and perhaps many repercussions of this shift remain to be seen.


Image credits: Stock photos licensed from Depositphotos

Source : Peta Pixel More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.