IBIS Shootout: Panasonic vs Fujifilm vs Olympus vs Sony

Dave Pardue over at Imaging Resource has just finished filming a crop-sensor IBIS shootout that you definitely want to check out. Using a specially-built four-camera “rig”, he shot the Panasonic GH5, Fuji X-T4, Olympus E-M1 III, and Sony a6600 side-by-side (by-side-by-side) so you can see exactly how the stabilization in each camera compares. “In-body image […]

IBIS Shootout: Panasonic vs Fujifilm vs Olympus vs Sony

Dave Pardue over at has just finished filming a crop-sensor IBIS shootout that you definitely want to check out. Using a specially-built four-camera “rig”, he shot the Panasonic GH5, Fuji X-T4, Olympus E-M1 III, and Sony a6600 side-by-side (by-side-by-side) so you can see exactly how the stabilization in each camera compares.

“In-body image stabilization is a key component to shooting good video, so we’ve created a special rig for shooting 4 cameras at the same time,” writes Pardue in the video description. “Shooting all four at the same time and at the same focal lengths, and with no OIS or electronic IS to come to their aid, [we steadily increased] the difficulty level to see which IBIS systems can take the heat as the bumps and shakes begin to rise.”

As Pardue says, they start easy and work their way up to more challenging scenarios as the video progresses. He performed 8 tests in all:

  • A slow hand-held pan – 4:00
  • Smooth driving vehicle – 4:27
  • Walking down a road – 4:56
  • Riding a bicycle – 5:50
  • Bumpy golf cart on a smooth road, 2 tests – 6:28
  • Bumpy golf cart on a bumpy bridge, 2 tests – 7:33
Dave Pardue’s special 4-camera IBIS testing rig.

You can watch the full tests for yourself above, but the (spoiler alert) results are immediately obvious once you get to the more challenging tests in the middle of the video.

The two Micro Four Thirds cameras both did exceptionally well, with the E-M1 Mark III taking the top spot and the GH5 coming in a close second. The APS-C cameras didn’t fare quite as well, but Fuji made a strong showing for third, while the Sony a6600 obviously underperformed the rest of the field across the board.

But don’t take our word for it, check out the video up top or to read the full write-up. And keep an eye out, because it sounds like they’ll be doing more of these IBIS shootouts in the near future.

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Meike Unveils a 50mm f/1.2 Lens for Canon, Nikon, and Sony for Just $360

If you’re looking for a cheap lens for capturing ultra-shallow depth of field, Hong Kong-based lens maker Meike has got you covered. They just unveiled a manual focus 50mm f/1.2 lens for Sony E, Nikon Z, Canon RF, and Canon EF mounts that will run you just $360. The lens was officially released on July […]

Meike Unveils a 50mm f/1.2 Lens for Canon, Nikon, and Sony for Just $360

If you’re looking for a cheap lens for capturing ultra-shallow depth of field, Hong Kong-based lens maker Meike has got you covered. They just unveiled a manual focus 50mm f/1.2 lens for Sony E, Nikon Z, Canon RF, and Canon EF mounts that will run you just $360.

The lens was officially released on July 24th, although Meike did send it to a few YouTubers before that.

Optically, it’s made up of 12 elements in 7 groups, boasts a minimum focus distance of ~2 feet (0.6 meters), weighs a hefty 1.36lb (620g), and features an aperture that goes from f/1.2 all the way down to f/22. Importantly, the lens has no electronic contacts on the mount. It’s fully manual. So you’ll need to enable “release shutter without lens” in your cameras’s settings in order to use it, and you won’t be capturing any EXIF data from the lens.

Here’s a closer look at the lens:

And here’s a hands-on video from YouTuber Arthur R, who got to test the lens on his Sony cameras ahead of announcement:

For those of you wondering if this lens is usable out in the wild at f/1.2, Arthur says that it is. Because the focus ring is “super smooth and well damped” with plenty of rotation, he says that using the lens at f/1.2 was “a lot easier than I expected.” Of course, it’s not going to be the sharpest lens in your collection when shooting wide-open, and it does suffer from flaring and chromatic aberration at larger apertures, but that just goes to show that the old axiom holds: “you get what you pay for.”

To learn more about the lens, check out his full hands-on video above.

The lens isn’t up on third-party retail sites just yet, but you can head over to the Meike website to pre-order yours in Sony FE, Nikon Z, Canon RF, and Canon EF mounts for the aforementioned price tag of $360. Estimated delivery for pre-orders is August 15th.

(via Nikon Rumors and DPReview)

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