Instagram Tests ‘Personal Fundraiser’ Feature Similar to GoFundMe

Earlier today, Instagram announced that it would be testing a new “personal fundraiser” feature that will let users raise money for a personal cause directly through the photo sharing app. That includes things like raising money for “personal emergencies,” like having your gear stolen, or even raising money to fund your “hobbies.” Instagram shared the […]

Instagram Tests ‘Personal Fundraiser’ Feature Similar to GoFundMe

Earlier today, Instagram announced that it would be testing a new “personal fundraiser” feature that will let users raise money for a personal cause directly through the photo sharing app. That includes things like raising money for “personal emergencies,” like having your gear stolen, or even raising money to fund your “hobbies.”

Instagram shared the news on its blog, and while this is still a small test being conducted in a select few countries—just the US, UK, and Ireland for now—the feature could come to replace some of the popular GoFundMe campaigns that we’ve seen both within and without the photo industry.

Unlike more traditional Fundraising features on Facebook and Instagram that are limited to raising money for established non-profits, this new feature allows you to create your own “personal cause” just as long as it complies with Facebook’s published guidelines. Causes must fit into one of 14 categories, including Medical, Education, Faith, Community Projects, Hobbies, and Personal Emergencies.

You can learn more about the personal fundraiser feature in the video below:

Creating a personal fundraiser is easy: you just “Edit Profile,” “Add Fundraiser” and then “Raise Money.” You’ll need to select a category and add further details, at which point Facebook/Instagram will review and approve your fundraiser, assuming it matches the eligibility criteria set out at this link.

Each fundraiser lasts for 30 days, with the option to extend for another 30 days once time runs out.

This is an interesting feature, and one that could start seeing widespread use among photographers and photography enthusiasts if it is released more broadly. We’ve seen businesses and individuals alike attempt to recoup losses from stolen gear or property damage (or COVID-related losses) through GoFundMe, and the “Hobbies” category opens up the opportunity for photographers to fund the purchase of new gear and upgrades.

To learn more about the feature, check out the full announcement post here. For now, it’s still a small roll-out, but Instagram is already promising to expand the feature “in the coming months.”

(via TechCrunch)

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New 4K Video Takes You on a High-Res Tour of the Martian Landscape

The folks over at ElderFox Documentaries have put together a “world’s first.” Using ultra-high resolution photo mosaics captured by NASA’s various Mars Rovers over the years, they’ve created a 4K UHD ‘tour’ of the Martian landscape. The “world’s first” designation is admittedly a bit of a stretch (and the narrator is a bit much…) but […]

New 4K Video Takes You on a High-Res Tour of the Martian Landscape

The folks over at ElderFox Documentaries have put together a “world’s first.” Using ultra-high resolution photo mosaics captured by NASA’s various Mars Rovers over the years, they’ve created a 4K UHD ‘tour’ of the Martian landscape.

The “world’s first” designation is admittedly a bit of a stretch (and the narrator is a bit much…) but the resulting video amounts to a stunning 4K slide show that covers the most beautiful and detailed imagery that has ever been sent home from the red planet. It’s also the closest we’ll get to seeing 4K video of Mars for some time, because as Elderfox explains:

Although the cameras are high quality, the rate at which the rovers can send data back to earth is the biggest challenge. Curiosity can only send data directly back to earth at 32 kilo-bits per second.

When the rover can connect to the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, we get more favourable speeds of 2 Megabytes per second. However, this link is only available for about 8 minutes each Sol, or Martian day.

As you would expect, sending HD video at these speeds would take a long long time. As nothing really moves on Mars, it makes more sense to take and send back images.

We’ve shared some of these images in the past—you can see the highest-resolution pano ever captured on Mars at this link—but this is the first time we’ve shared them all together in one high-resolution “journey” across the Martian landscape. Check out the full video up top to see it for yourself and learn more about how these images were captured, stitched together, and sent back to Earth from (at minimum) 33.9 million miles away.

(via Colossal)

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