Instant Influencer: Judges' Advice on How to Make Marketable Trends

The season finale of James Charles' Instant Influencer aired on YouTube and fans were given valuable insight on how to create marketable trends.

Instant Influencer: Judges' Advice on How to Make Marketable Trends

The season finale of Instant Influencer recently aired on YouTube and the wait is finally over to find out who James Charles' first chosen influencer is. During the episode, each contestant competed in this week's challenge to create the next "mega makeup moment trend."

When building their artistic choices, contestants were given a period of consulting with James Charles himself. In these moments, the audience was provided insight on what exactly makes a marketable trend.

Related: James Charles' Instant Influencer: Who Are Nikita Dragun & Bretman Rock From Episode 3

For example, Benny had the idea of creating an image that emulated a bunny wearing a black mask. During his consulting session with James, we learned that this idea originally came from pop star Ariana Grande. Upon realizing this, James advised Benny that to make a marketable trend, there has to be a uniqueness to it. He then instructed him to create something about his concept that has a specific meaning. James also reinforced this point when meeting with Ashley. Ashley wanted to create a concept based off of a well known brand. But James cautioned her to be wary of possible legal ramifications should her concept not be original. James advised each contestant that to make marketable trend their concept's need originality.

Moreover, when meeting with both Ashley and Kaitlin the girls had similar ideas with writing different meaningful messages on their faces. James expressed support of these ideas stating that they showed originality and that their concepts could be easily replicated by followers. He emphasized that both of these traits are important when formulating a marketable trend. When it came time to judging, Benny's make up art while impressive was criticized for this fact. The judges stated that a marketable trend has to both resonate with followers as well as be replicated.

Furthermore, the judges also stressed the content of marketable trends. James made the comment in regards to Kaitlin that although her detail with gems and sequins would be hard to replicate it isn't the objective point of her look. Kaitlin's focus was on her content which were words written to express both perception of self and reality of self. She displayed these artistically on both sides of her face. James noted that this trend could go viral and followers would only focus on the writing while accomplishing whatever they wanted with the detail. In this sense, Kaitlin's concept was key.

Furthermore, Norvina pointed out that there has to be a genuine aspect to each concept. In a follow-up to the case of Kaitlin, Norvina observed that she had first written her perception of self and only then proceeded with her reality of self. Norvina saw this as not embracing the meaning of the concept. Instead, Kaitlin appeared to be pandering for a deeper meaning. As a result, her concept appeared to not invoke a genuine message. In the end, this certainly cost Kaitlin a great deal.

The season finale gave fans valuable insight from the best in the business on how to create a marketable trend. From what was learned, an influencer first has to make a concept that is original. This can be accomplished by creating something that holds an intrinsic meaning or something that is unique. Second, an influencer has to create something that is easily replicated. Most people are not make-up superstars so concepts need to be able to be accomplished by the average person. Third, the concept's idea has to resonate with followers. Make-up looks that have a great context or idea behind it attract more people to want to replicate it. Last but not least, a concept has to be genuine. People are great at spotting false behavior and when a concept is pandering it weakens the ability for people to resonate with it. From the season finale fans were certainly provided with value on how to create effective marketable trends. For more information watch James Charles' Instant Influencer season finale now which is available on YouTube.

Next: 90 Day Fiancé Prediction: Who Is Geoffrey Going on a Dinner Date With?

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Unproduced Static Shock Animated Movie For DC Animation Revealed By Artist

A new storyboard drawing of DC superhero Static Shock has surfaced and it's causing fans to wonder if the character is getting his own movie.

Unproduced Static Shock Animated Movie For DC Animation Revealed By Artist

An unproduced animated  movie was revealed when an artist attached to the project shared one of his storyboards. Static Shock was born from a subsidiary of DC Comics called Milestone Comics, which was established by a team of African American comic book creatives to address the lack of diversity permeating most comic books of the era. Milestone's heroes primarily existed within the fictional Midwestern city of Dakota, and of their characters, Static Shock became the most successful.

Born Virgil Ovid Hawkins, Static Shock acquired his powers after being exposed to an experimental chemical during a gang war. With Static Shock's success in the comic world, Milestone had an uphill battle trying to convince people outside of their target demographic to retain interest. And unfortunately, because the main character was African American, this didn't necessarily equal a huge following outside of the black community. There was a belief at the time that Static Shock was a "comic for blacks" by shop owners and readers, and therefore wouldn't or couldn't be enjoyed by anyone else. Sadly, this racist point of view was also used by executives to justify poor sales, when in actuality, there was a decline in sales across the board as the industry was on the edge of a major market crash at the time. Thankfully, Static's story didn't end there.

Related: Black Lightning's Season 2 Premiere Has One Big Static Shock Clue

Dreamworks Animation Director Chris Copeland shared a picture of a storyboard featuring Static Shock on Twitter. Copeland revealed it was one of the illustrations he used during a pitch meeting with Warner Bros. Animation. Unfortunately, it doesn't look like there's a Static Shock movie coming soon as Copeland only said he and his brother met with Warner Bros. to pitch an animated Static Shock film and hopefully one day it gets greenlit.

Copeland's followers immediately praised his artwork and showed their appreciation for Static Shock, with good reason. Although Milestone Comics closed its comic book division in 1997, it continued creating content as a licensing company through Milestone Media, and one of their biggest successes was a Kids' WB , which debuted in 2000 and ran for four seasons. Milestone co-founder and Static co-creator Dwayne McDuffie served as a writer and story editor for eleven episodes of the series, which was critically acclaimed and won a few awards, including an Emmy. The show was groundbreaking because it is the first cartoon to feature a young African American male in the leading role of his very own animated series.

Perhaps Warner Bros. will take into consideration the fact that Static Shock is truly a hero in more ways than one. Almost thirty years since being introduced to the world, the landscape of comic book movies and television has dramatically changed. And if the reaction to 2018's Marvel blockbuster has taught us anything, it's that there's power in telling the stories of underserved communities, and not just from a financial aspect. Representation matters now more than ever, and Static Shock represents the culmination of a dream to have every story told from the diverse elements of the human experience.

Next: WB Planning New 'Mortal Kombat' & Live-Action 'Static Shock' Webseries

Source: Chris Copeland/Twitter

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