Jim Miller down for ‘Cowboy’ Cerrone rematch for 40th UFC fight, serious about sticking around until UFC 300

Photo by Chris Unger/Zuffa LLCWith 38 fights under his belt in the UFC, Jim Miller still has plans for many more. After earning his 13th performance bonus for a stunning second-round knockout over octagon newcomer Erick Gonzalez on Saturday night, the 38-year-old New Jersey native made it clear that he’s not going anywhere, any time soon. In fact, Miller is deathly serious about pursuing his dream to become the only fighter to compete at UFC 100, UFC 200 and eventually UFC 300, which wouldn’t actually take place until at least 2024. One thing that’s certain is Miller’s commitment to continue fighting despite constant questions about when he might call it a career. “At the moment, yeah [I’d like to fight at UFC 300],” Miller said during the UFC Vegas 40 post-fight show. “I try to set short term goals for myself and getting to 40 [fights] in the UFC would be awesome. I’m very confident that I can get there. Physically, it’s not even really worrying about anything else. Now it’s like let’s throw that other one, that farther carrot and hunt for that. If I have to adjust the way that I train, if I have to adjust the pace that I fight at, I think I’ll be able to get there. It’s not set in stone. “It’s a little annoying I get asked about retirement all the time, every lead up to a fight because I’m willing to talk about it. Because I feel as a father, I’m being responsible talking about it but no time soon so I think we can hit it.” With his fight at UFC Vegas 40, Miller eclipsed Donald “Cowboy” Cerrone with the most fights in the history of the promotion after they were previously tied at 37 each. They previously faced off in 2014 with Cerrone getting the win by second-round knockout and Miller would definitely be down to run that back again as both athletes near 40 fights with the UFC. Then again, Miller has never been in the business of turning down any particular fight or opponent so he’s really to take on anybody the UFC throws at him. “If they wanted to do me versus Cerrone again at 40 [fights], I’m game for that,” Miller said. “Anyone. Really anyone. It does not matter. I’d love to get my opportunity back and have the rubber match with [Charles] Oliveira. I’d love to fight [Dustin] Poirier again and if Conor [McGregor] needs a fight, I’m game for it, too. Every one of them, all at once. Let’s go!” Earlier in his career, Miller earned a hilarious nickname from former matchmaker Joe Silva when he got the call about accepting a fight the UFC was offering him. He said yes without hesitation and Silva answered back by saying “of course you are … you’re Jim f*cking Miller.” View this post on Instagram A post shared by Jim Miller (@jimmiller_155) Miller carries pretty much that same exact attitude when asked about the kinds of opponents he’d like to face in the future as he approaches 40 UFC fights while hopefully pursuing a career that would last until UFC 300. “I don’t really care,” Miller said. “Honestly, I love fighting the veterans. I love fighting the guys that I know it’s going to be a great fight. The guys that I’ve really been a fan of. My fight with [Clay] Guida a few years ago, I have never been that excited for a fight. Cause I’ve seen him fight so many times. “But then Erick [Gonzalez] tonight, it’s a dangerous guy, I put myself in his position and I felt the pressure cause I know how he’d be feeling.”

Jim Miller down for ‘Cowboy’ Cerrone rematch for 40th UFC fight, serious about sticking around until UFC 300
Photo by Chris Unger/Zuffa LLC

With 38 fights under his belt in the UFC, Jim Miller still has plans for many more.

After earning his 13th performance bonus for a stunning second-round knockout over octagon newcomer Erick Gonzalez on Saturday night, the 38-year-old New Jersey native made it clear that he’s not going anywhere, any time soon.

In fact, Miller is deathly serious about pursuing his dream to become the only fighter to compete at UFC 100, UFC 200 and eventually UFC 300, which wouldn’t actually take place until at least 2024.

One thing that’s certain is Miller’s commitment to continue fighting despite constant questions about when he might call it a career.

UFC Vegas 40 post-fight show. “I try to set short term goals for myself and getting to 40 [fights] in the UFC would be awesome. I’m very confident that I can get there. Physically, it’s not even really worrying about anything else. Now it’s like let’s throw that other one, that farther carrot and hunt for that. If I have to adjust the way that I train, if I have to adjust the pace that I fight at, I think I’ll be able to get there. It’s not set in stone.

“It’s a little annoying I get asked about retirement all the time, every lead up to a fight because I’m willing to talk about it. Because I feel as a father, I’m being responsible talking about it but no time soon so I think we can hit it.”

With his fight at UFC Vegas 40, Miller eclipsed Donald “Cowboy” Cerrone with the most fights in the history of the promotion after they were previously tied at 37 each.

They previously faced off in 2014 with Cerrone getting the win by second-round knockout and Miller would definitely be down to run that back again as both athletes near 40 fights with the UFC. Then again, Miller has never been in the business of turning down any particular fight or opponent so he’s really to take on anybody the UFC throws at him.

“If they wanted to do me versus Cerrone again at 40 [fights], I’m game for that,” Miller said. “Anyone. Really anyone. It does not matter. I’d love to get my opportunity back and have the rubber match with [Charles] Oliveira. I’d love to fight [Dustin] Poirier again and if Conor [McGregor] needs a fight, I’m game for it, too. Every one of them, all at once. Let’s go!”

Earlier in his career, Miller earned a hilarious nickname from former matchmaker Joe Silva when he got the call about accepting a fight the UFC was offering him.

He said yes without hesitation and Silva answered back by saying “of course you are … you’re Jim f*cking Miller.”

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Jim Miller (@jimmiller_155)

Miller carries pretty much that same exact attitude when asked about the kinds of opponents he’d like to face in the future as he approaches 40 UFC fights while hopefully pursuing a career that would last until UFC 300.

“I don’t really care,” Miller said. “Honestly, I love fighting the veterans. I love fighting the guys that I know it’s going to be a great fight. The guys that I’ve really been a fan of. My fight with [Clay] Guida a few years ago, I have never been that excited for a fight. Cause I’ve seen him fight so many times.

“But then Erick [Gonzalez] tonight, it’s a dangerous guy, I put myself in his position and I felt the pressure cause I know how he’d be feeling.”

Source : MMA Fighting More   

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Dominick Cruz buries hatchet with Monster, ‘completely open’ to charity fight with Hans Molenkamp

Photo by Chris Unger/Zuffa LLCAfter talking to Monster and Hans Molenkamp, Dominick Cruz feels a lot better about his relationship with the longtime sponsor and its rep. That said, the offer he made after his most recent fight is on the table. “I’m still completely open to a charity fight with Hans Molenkamp,” Cruz said Wednesday on The MMA Hour. “That’s there. I think Hans might be open to that, too. I don’t know. He might really want to punch me in the face by this point, who knows. But I have no beef with Monster.” It appeared that might not be the case after Cruz used a post-win interview in March to call out Molenkamp, igniting a discussion about the rep’s behavior, the role of sponsors in the MMA industry, and even accusations of impropriety from former Monster employees and UFC fighters. Cruz said he didn’t intend to start a debate about a sponsor he believes has done a lot of good things for fighters. He just had a bad taste in his mouth after dealing with Molenkamp, and he didn’t hide it. With some reflection, he realized that was as much his fault as it was the Monster employee. “This was never about Monster,” Cruz said. “It was about me and my relationship with one person, and I called him out on that night, because they asked me who I wanted to face next, and I told them the truth. You can’t get mad at a guy for telling the truth. “My beef with Monster is nonexistent. There is no beef with Monster. Monster has supported athletes all over the world, and they’re supporting me still to this day, because me and Monster have always been cool — it was me and this person that needed to discuss things and have a clear-off and some communication, and we have.” One of the issues that came to light as the result of Cruz’s post-fight interview was Molenkamp’s position of power and the use of social media for personal benefit. Cruz accused the rep of threatening his status with Monster if he didn’t comment on posts. Looking back on the situation, Cruz said, the whole situation boiled down to a lack of communication. So eventually, he said he and Molenkamp talked things out. “Well, I mean, I’m an adult,” Cruz said. “So I definitely talked it out, but it was coming down to the social media thing, where if I take a picture with the Lamborghini, I own the Lamborghini. Once I cleared [up], hey, as much as you might think I’m the Lamborghini that you get to stunt in front of, let’s make a clear communication and a boundary right now that that can’t be used. “When looking at the big picture, I come down to I’m responsible for everything I create in my life. So in the end, it was my responsibility to create a boundary with this person in the first place that I didn’t do, which created a resentment. Expectations are resentments under construction. I really expected that this guy wouldn’t need my platform in order to build himself. That’s like, I think, man to man, eye to eye, shouldn’t have to say that to another man. However, this day and age, look all around us. That’s what we’re living in this world where the internet can botch reality. People who live in a little tiny bubble in a chasm, or in a cavern, can look out and pretend that they’re something huge. So when you grab on to people that are doing something with their life and run with it, you can now latch ahold of that and make something of yourself.” Molenkamp continues to work with Monster in a contract position for Athletics Business Development; the rep did not respond to a request for comment from MMA Fighting about Cruz’s charity fight offer. Cruz, a two-time UFC bantamweight champion, is making what could be his final push for a belt as he returns to the octagon at UFC 269 for a bout against Pedro Munhoz. As many of his contemporaries retire, he remains passionate about the sport and his desire to be champ. Behind the scenes, Cruz is applying the same exacting standards of his training to the relationships he has with people in the business. If you want to use him to build your brand, there better be a clear set of expectations. “What I needed to do was create that boundary, and as soon as I do that, I can be friends with anybody,” he said. “Boundaries were my issue in that situation — that I didn’t create — and so now me and Monster, and me and that person, all of us can get along. It was my responsibility to do that, I didn’t do that in the first place, and here we are. It all worked out.”

Dominick Cruz buries hatchet with Monster, ‘completely open’ to charity fight with Hans Molenkamp
Photo by Chris Unger/Zuffa LLC

After talking to Monster and Hans Molenkamp, Dominick Cruz feels a lot better about his relationship with the longtime sponsor and its rep.

That said, the offer he made after his most recent fight is on the table.

“I’m still completely open to a charity fight with Hans Molenkamp,” Cruz said Wednesday on The MMA Hour. “That’s there. I think Hans might be open to that, too. I don’t know. He might really want to punch me in the face by this point, who knows. But I have no beef with Monster.”

It appeared that might not be the case after Cruz used a post-win interview in March to call out Molenkamp, igniting a discussion about the rep’s behavior, the role of sponsors in the MMA industry, and even accusations of impropriety from former Monster employees and UFC fighters.

Cruz said he didn’t intend to start a debate about a sponsor he believes has done a lot of good things for fighters. He just had a bad taste in his mouth after dealing with Molenkamp, and he didn’t hide it. With some reflection, he realized that was as much his fault as it was the Monster employee.

“This was never about Monster,” Cruz said. “It was about me and my relationship with one person, and I called him out on that night, because they asked me who I wanted to face next, and I told them the truth. You can’t get mad at a guy for telling the truth.

“My beef with Monster is nonexistent. There is no beef with Monster. Monster has supported athletes all over the world, and they’re supporting me still to this day, because me and Monster have always been cool — it was me and this person that needed to discuss things and have a clear-off and some communication, and we have.”

One of the issues that came to light as the result of Cruz’s post-fight interview was Molenkamp’s position of power and the use of social media for personal benefit. Cruz accused the rep of threatening his status with Monster if he didn’t comment on posts.

Looking back on the situation, Cruz said, the whole situation boiled down to a lack of communication. So eventually, he said he and Molenkamp talked things out.

“Well, I mean, I’m an adult,” Cruz said. “So I definitely talked it out, but it was coming down to the social media thing, where if I take a picture with the Lamborghini, I own the Lamborghini. Once I cleared [up], hey, as much as you might think I’m the Lamborghini that you get to stunt in front of, let’s make a clear communication and a boundary right now that that can’t be used.

“When looking at the big picture, I come down to I’m responsible for everything I create in my life. So in the end, it was my responsibility to create a boundary with this person in the first place that I didn’t do, which created a resentment. Expectations are resentments under construction. I really expected that this guy wouldn’t need my platform in order to build himself. That’s like, I think, man to man, eye to eye, shouldn’t have to say that to another man. However, this day and age, look all around us. That’s what we’re living in this world where the internet can botch reality. People who live in a little tiny bubble in a chasm, or in a cavern, can look out and pretend that they’re something huge. So when you grab on to people that are doing something with their life and run with it, you can now latch ahold of that and make something of yourself.”

Molenkamp continues to work with Monster in a contract position for Athletics Business Development; the rep did not respond to a request for comment from MMA Fighting about Cruz’s charity fight offer.

Cruz, a two-time UFC bantamweight champion, is making what could be his final push for a belt as he returns to the octagon at UFC 269 for a bout against Pedro Munhoz. As many of his contemporaries retire, he remains passionate about the sport and his desire to be champ.

Behind the scenes, Cruz is applying the same exacting standards of his training to the relationships he has with people in the business. If you want to use him to build your brand, there better be a clear set of expectations.

“What I needed to do was create that boundary, and as soon as I do that, I can be friends with anybody,” he said. “Boundaries were my issue in that situation — that I didn’t create — and so now me and Monster, and me and that person, all of us can get along. It was my responsibility to do that, I didn’t do that in the first place, and here we are. It all worked out.”

Source : MMA Fighting More   

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