Julia Potter-Bobb, 32, turns back the clock on a 36-hole day at Purdue

Julia Potter-Bobb thought taking a pushcart, versus going it on foot, would be a game-time decision on the first day of the Golfweek Purdue (...)

Julia Potter-Bobb, 32, turns back the clock on a 36-hole day at Purdue

Julia Potter-Bobb thought taking a pushcart, versus going it on foot, would be a game-time decision on the first day of the Golfweek Purdue Amateur. A 36-hole day at Purdue’s Ackerman-Allen Golf Course was about testing limits for this former collegian, now 32.

“Could I still do what I was doing at 22-23?”

It’s not as if Potter-Bobb doesn’t compete against this level of player at this intensity anymore. She frequents USGA championships (owns two U.S. Women’s Mid-Amateur titles, in fact) and those always include a double-round day. It’s the idea of facing it at the outset, and all the good and bad that comes with that, that makes a 36-hole college day different.

“Just the mental fortitude you would need, whether you got off to a good start and then had to go back out and play a second 18 with bar set high or you got off to a bad start and knew you had to come back and play that same hole again,” she said.

Leaderboard: Golfweek Purdue Amateur

Potter-Bobb birdied her second hole at Ackerman-Allen on Saturday morning. She went on to an opening 75 and followed it with 71 to land inside the top 10 after the first day of the event. Louisville fifth-year senior Lauren Hartlage led after rounds of 68-67.

Potter-Bobb likes to say that if her 32-year-old self played her 22-year-old self (who was a standout at the University of Missouri), 32 would win almost every time.

“I think what I’ve learned, and this is maybe the difference between being in college and being out of college and having a career established, is it really is just a game and there is always a next round,” she said.

She can get past the stings, the mistakes and the losses. Rather than living and dying by her last round, she lives and dies by the next one. It can be freeing on the golf course.

Potter-Bobb is the only player in either field at the Golfweek Purdue Amateur who isn’t a current collegian. She works as the director of member services in the Indiana Golf Office. There are some ways in which working in the golf industry makes it easier for her to tee it up in competition, but in other ways, it’s harder.

The summer competitive season is a busy time of year, making it harder to slip away. Potter-Bobb thinks her schedule was maybe more open in 2020, because of the pandemic, than it has been in years past. She was able to play last week’s inaugural Amateur Golf Alliance Women’s Amateur in Florida, a new tournament created just for mid-amateurs that was pushed back from May, and finished runner-up to Lauren Greenlief. Two days before the Golfweek Purdue Amateur, she played a U.S. Women’s Amateur Four-Ball qualifier with partner Kelsey Chugg, another former Women’s Mid-Am champ. The two qualified.

Many tournament opportunities are controlled by a player’s WAGR ranking, and it can be hard – with a full-time job – to play a number of events that keeps a player like Potter-Bobb in the conversation for elite opportunities like the Curtis Cup and the Augusta National Women’s Amateur.

“If I want to have these opportunities to play in certain tournaments, I have to keep in mind my number and take advantage when I can,” she said.

In that sense, the Purdue event presented the perfect opportunity.

“I’ve kind of been stating the last few years that I wish I had more events in October and November that I could play in,” she said. “I wish I had more WAGR events that are near me. I wish we had more weekend events I could play so I don’t have to take time away from my work. Lo and behold, this event hits all three that I’ve complained about. At some point, I have to put my money where my mouth is.”

She’s putting her game there, too. No surprise here: It’s holding up just fine.

Source : Golf Week More   

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Gary Player on Bryson DeChambeau and what he might do to Augusta: 'He is a step above them all'

NEWTOWN SQUARE, Pa. – Gary Player flew to Philadelphia for a three-day stay with his daughter that turned into six months. He came (...)

Gary Player on Bryson DeChambeau and what he might do to Augusta: 'He is a step above them all'

NEWTOWN SQUARE, Pa. – Gary Player flew to Philadelphia for a three-day stay with his daughter that turned into six months. He came out to Aronimink Golf Club on Saturday, site of his 1962 PGA Championship victory, and met with the media as leaders of the KPMG Women’s PGA Championship made the turn.

Player, not surprisingly, had much to say.

“Coming back here now, 58 years later than when I won it, first of all, most people are dead,” said Player, looking trim in his signature all-black ensemble. “I’m 85 now and all my golfing friends are gone, so I’m very grateful to be standing here and very strong and fit.”

Player is gearing up for his ceremonial tee shot at the Masters next month alongside Jack Nicklaus by playing a bucket-list rota for the rest of us that includes Merion, Pine Valley and Aronimink, to name a few.

He also weighed in one of the hottest topics in golf, Bryson DeChambeau, predicting that if the recent U.S. Open champ teed it up at the Old Course tomorrow, he could drive almost nine greens at the Home of Golf.

When asked about Augusta National, Player said that if DeChambeau has a “reasonable week,” he should win.

“It’s going to be fascinating to watch him hit a 9-iron to the second hole at Augusta, if he hits that draw around the corner,” he said. “At 15, he’ll hit a 9-iron, a par-5. At 13, he’ll hit a 9-iron, a par-5. He’s going to drive over the green at No. 3. Think about that. Going to drive over the green. So I don’t know where we’re going.”

Augusta National, Player says, has no defense and golf leaders need to understand that the game is in its infancy when it comes to driving distance, talking about drives that might one day go 500 yards. He’d like to see the governing bodies cut the ball back 50 yards for professionals before golf courses become obsolete. (And please, he reiterates, don’t touch the trees.)

While Player can’t comment on DeChambeau’s diet – “I just hope that he watches that he doesn’t overeat” – he has mad respect for what DeChambeau has done.

“They all said, ‘Here comes the kook, here comes the scientist,’ but he’s been more brilliant than all of them,” said Player, “and there’s nothing worse than when you think you have a superior attitude to others, and they actually have a superior knowledge to you.

“He is a step above them all, and he has a phenomenally good golf swing. They all say … he has a strange swing. It might look strange, but basically in pieces, it’s one of the best swings a human being could have. This man, there’s no telling how well he can do.”

 

 

Source : Golf Week More   

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