June 10 Solar Eclipse in the Northern Hemisphere! On June 10, people in parts of the northern...

June 10 Solar Eclipse in the Northern Hemisphere! On June 10, people in parts of the northern hemisphere will have the chance to witness a solar eclipse.Watch the full visualization of the eclipse.The June 10 eclipse is an annular solar eclipse, meaning that the Sun will never be completely covered by the Moon. The Moon’s orbit around the Earth is not a perfect circle, so throughout each month, the Moon’s distance from Earth varies. During an annular eclipse, the Moon is far enough away from Earth that the Moon appears smaller than the Sun in the sky. Since the Moon does not block the entire view of the Sun, it will look like a dark disk on top of a larger, bright disk. This creates what looks like a ring of fire around the Moon.People in the narrow path of annularity — which, for this eclipse, cuts through Canada, Greenland, and northern Russia — will see the ring of fire effect as the Moon passes across the Sun.Credit: Dale CruikshankOutside this path of annularity, many people in the northern hemisphere have a chance to see a partial solar eclipse. The partial eclipse will fall on parts of the eastern United States, as well as northern Alaska. Some locations will only see a very small piece of the Sun covered, while locations closer to the path of annularity can see the Moon cover most of the Sun.To learn which times the eclipse may be visible in certain areas, you can click anywhere on the map here. (Note that the maximum obscuration and maximum eclipse timing noted on this map may occur before sunrise in many locations.)This solar eclipse is a pair with the total lunar eclipse that happened on May 26.Both solar and lunar eclipses happen when the Sun, Moon, and Earth line up in the same plane — a lunar eclipse happens when Earth is in the middle and casts its shadow on the Moon, and a solar eclipse happens when the Moon is in the middle and casts its shadow on Earth. The Moon’s orbit is tilted, so it’s usually too high or too low for this alignment to work out.The May 26 lunar eclipse was a supermoon lunar eclipse, meaning that the full moon happened while the Moon was near its closest point to Earth, making the Moon appear larger in the sky. The solar eclipse happens at the opposite point of the Moon’s orbit, during the new moon — and in this case, the new moon happens near the Moon’s farthest point from Earth, making the Moon appear smaller and resulting in an annular (rather than total) solar eclipse.How to watch the eclipseFrom anywhere: Watch the eclipse online with us! Weather permitting, we’ll be sharing live telescope views of the partial eclipse courtesy of Luc Boulard of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada Sudbury Centre. Tune in starting at 5 a.m. EDT on June 10 at nasa.gov/live. From the path of the annular or partial eclipse: Be sure to take safety precuations if you plan to watch in person!It is never safe to look directly at the Sun’s rays, even if the Sun is partly or mostly obscured, like during a partial or annular eclipse — doing so can severely harm your eyes. If you’re planning to watch the eclipse on June 10, you should use solar viewing glasses or an indirect viewing method at all points during the eclipse if you want to face the Sun. Solar viewing glasses, sometimes called eclipse glasses, are NOT regular sunglasses; regular sunglasses are not safe for viewing the Sun.If you don’t have solar viewing or eclipse glasses, you can use an alternate indirect method like a pinhole projector. Pinhole projectors shouldn’t be used to look at the Sun; instead, they’re an easy way to project an image of the Sun onto a surface. Read more about how to create a pinhole projector. This is a sunrise eclipse in the contiguous U.S. At locations in the lower 48 states that can see the partial eclipse, the show starts before sunrise, when the Sun is still below the horizon. That means the best chance to see the eclipse in these locations will be during and shortly after sunrise, when the Sun is very low in the sky. In northern Alaska, the eclipse happens in the very early hours of June 10 when the Sun is low on the horizon. Bottom line: If you’re trying to watch the eclipse in the contiguous U.S., look for a location with a clear view of the horizon to the northeast, and plan to watch starting at sunrise with your solar filter or indirect viewer.The next two eclipses in the continental U.S. are in 2023 and 2024. The annular solar eclipse of Oct. 14, 2023, will cut from Oregon to Texas, and the total solar eclipse of April 8, 2024, will pass from Texas to Maine. Keep up with the latest on eclipses and eclipse science at nasa.gov/eclipse. Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com.

June 10 Solar Eclipse in the Northern Hemisphere! On June 10, people in parts of the northern...

June 10 Solar Eclipse in the Northern Hemisphere!

On June 10, people in parts of the northern hemisphere will have the chance to witness a solar eclipse.

Watch the full visualization of the eclipse.

The June 10 eclipse is an annular solar eclipse, meaning that the Sun will never be completely covered by the Moon. The Moon’s orbit around the Earth is not a perfect circle, so throughout each month, the Moon’s distance from Earth varies. During an annular eclipse, the Moon is far enough away from Earth that the Moon appears smaller than the Sun in the sky. Since the Moon does not block the entire view of the Sun, it will look like a dark disk on top of a larger, bright disk. This creates what looks like a ring of fire around the Moon.

People in the narrow path of annularity — which, for this eclipse, cuts through Canada, Greenland, and northern Russia — will see the ring of fire effect as the Moon passes across the Sun.

Credit: Dale Cruikshank

Outside this path of annularity, many people in the northern hemisphere have a chance to see a partial solar eclipse. The partial eclipse will fall on parts of the eastern United States, as well as northern Alaska. Some locations will only see a very small piece of the Sun covered, while locations closer to the path of annularity can see the Moon cover most of the Sun.

To learn which times the eclipse may be visible in certain areas, you can click anywhere on the map here. (Note that the maximum obscuration and maximum eclipse timing noted on this map may occur before sunrise in many locations.)

This solar eclipse is a pair with the total lunar eclipse that happened on May 26.

Both solar and lunar eclipses happen when the Sun, Moon, and Earth line up in the same plane — a lunar eclipse happens when Earth is in the middle and casts its shadow on the Moon, and a solar eclipse happens when the Moon is in the middle and casts its shadow on Earth. The Moon’s orbit is tilted, so it’s usually too high or too low for this alignment to work out.

The May 26 lunar eclipse was a supermoon lunar eclipse, meaning that the full moon happened while the Moon was near its closest point to Earth, making the Moon appear larger in the sky. The solar eclipse happens at the opposite point of the Moon’s orbit, during the new moon — and in this case, the new moon happens near the Moon’s farthest point from Earth, making the Moon appear smaller and resulting in an annular (rather than total) solar eclipse.

How to watch the eclipse

From anywhere: Watch the eclipse online with us! Weather permitting, we’ll be sharing live telescope views of the partial eclipse courtesy of Luc Boulard of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada Sudbury Centre. Tune in starting at 5 a.m. EDT on June 10 at nasa.gov/live.

From the path of the annular or partial eclipse: Be sure to take safety precuations if you plan to watch in person!

It is never safe to look directly at the Sun’s rays, even if the Sun is partly or mostly obscured, like during a partial or annular eclipse — doing so can severely harm your eyes. If you’re planning to watch the eclipse on June 10, you should use solar viewing glasses or an indirect viewing method at all points during the eclipse if you want to face the Sun. Solar viewing glasses, sometimes called eclipse glasses, are NOT regular sunglasses; regular sunglasses are not safe for viewing the Sun.

If you don’t have solar viewing or eclipse glasses, you can use an alternate indirect method like a pinhole projector. Pinhole projectors shouldn’t be used to look at the Sun; instead, they’re an easy way to project an image of the Sun onto a surface. Read more about how to create a pinhole projector.

This is a sunrise eclipse in the contiguous U.S. At locations in the lower 48 states that can see the partial eclipse, the show starts before sunrise, when the Sun is still below the horizon. That means the best chance to see the eclipse in these locations will be during and shortly after sunrise, when the Sun is very low in the sky. In northern Alaska, the eclipse happens in the very early hours of June 10 when the Sun is low on the horizon.

Bottom line: If you’re trying to watch the eclipse in the contiguous U.S., look for a location with a clear view of the horizon to the northeast, and plan to watch starting at sunrise with your solar filter or indirect viewer.

The next two eclipses in the continental U.S. are in 2023 and 2024. The annular solar eclipse of Oct. 14, 2023, will cut from Oregon to Texas, and the total solar eclipse of April 8, 2024, will pass from Texas to Maine. Keep up with the latest on eclipses and eclipse science at nasa.gov/eclipse.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com.

Source : NASA More   

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NASA Sees Our Ocean in Color. How About You?Take a deep breath. Feel the oxygen in your lungs. We...

NASA Sees Our Ocean in Color. How About You?Take a deep breath. Feel the oxygen in your lungs. We have the ocean to thank for that! Over long time scales, between 50 and 70 percent of our planet’s oxygen is produced by microscopic organisms living in the ocean.Today is World Oceans Day! And as our planet’s climate continues to change, we want to understand how one of our biggest ecosystems is changing with it.Wondering how you can celebrate with NASA? We’ve got downloadable coloring pages and online coloring interactives to show how we study the ocean. Read on.From Space to SeaDownload ocean missions coloring page hereDownload Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich coloring page hereWe use planes, boats, Earth-observing satellites and much more to study the ocean and partner with organizations all over the world. Here are a few examples:From SeaThe Export Processes in the Ocean from Remote Sensing (EXPORTS) is oen way we study the ocean from the sea. study changes in the ocean’s carbon cycle. In May, scientists and crew conducted research on three ships in the Northern Atlantic Ocean. They hope to create models to better understand climate change patterns.From SpaceLaunched last year, the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich spacecraft began a five-and-a-half-year prime mission to collect the most accurate data yet on global sea level and how our oceans are rising in response to climate change. Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich is just one of many satellites monitoring the ocean from space. Together with other Earth-observing spacecraft, the mission will also collect precise data of atmospheric temperature and humidity to help improve weather forecasts and climate models.Finding EddiesDownload Eddies Coloring PageThe ocean is full of eddies – swirling water masses that look like hurricanes in the atmosphere. Eddies are often hot spots for biological activity that plays an important role in absorbing carbon. . We find eddies by looking for small changes in the height of the ocean surface, using multiple satellites continuously orbiting Earth. We also look at eddies up close, using ships and planes to study their role in the carbon cycle.Monitoring Aerosols and CloudsClouds coloring interactive hereAerosols coloring interactive hereTiny particles in the air called aerosols interact with clouds. These interactions are some of the most poorly understood components of Earth’s climate system. Clouds and aerosols can absorb, scatter or reflect incoming radiation – heat and light from the Sun – depending on their type, abundance and locations in the atmosphere. We’re building new instruments to better understand aerosols and contribute to air quality forecasts.The Ocean in Living ColorDownload PACE coloring page hereThe Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission will continue and greatly advance observations of global ocean color, biogeochemistry, and ecology, as well as Earth’s carbon cycle and atmospheric aerosols and clouds. It’s set to launch in late 2023 to early 2024. Want to learn more? Click here to see how PACE will collect data and here to see what PACE will see through our coloring interactives. (Make sure to check out the hidden surprises in both!)Exploring Ocean Worlds on Earth and BeyondDownload Clouds coloring page hereUsing our understanding of oceans on Earth, we also study oceans on other planets. Mars, for example, contains water frozen in the ice caps or trapped beneath the soil. But there’s even more water out there. Planets and moons in our solar system and beyond have giant oceans on their surface. Saturn’s moon Enceladus is thought to have a massive ocean under its frozen surface, which sometimes sprays into space through massive fissures in the ice.Learn more about ocean worlds here: nasa.gov/oceanworldsInterested in learning more about how NASA studies oceans? Follow @NASAClimate, @NASAOcean and @NASAEarth.You can also find all the coloring pages and interactives here.Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com.

NASA Sees Our Ocean in Color. How About You?Take a deep breath. Feel the oxygen in your lungs. We...

NASA Sees Our Ocean in Color. How About You?

Take a deep breath. Feel the oxygen in your lungs. We have the ocean to thank for that! Over long time scales, between 50 and 70 percent of our planet’s oxygen is produced by microscopic organisms living in the ocean.

Today is World Oceans Day! And as our planet’s climate continues to change, we want to understand how one of our biggest ecosystems is changing with it.

Wondering how you can celebrate with NASA? We’ve got downloadable coloring pages and online coloring interactives to show how we study the ocean. Read on.

From Space to Sea

Download ocean missions coloring page here
Download Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich coloring page here

We use planes, boats, Earth-observing satellites and much more to study the ocean and partner with organizations all over the world. Here are a few examples:

From Sea

The Export Processes in the Ocean from Remote Sensing (EXPORTS) is oen way we study the ocean from the sea. study changes in the ocean’s carbon cycle. In May, scientists and crew conducted research on three ships in the Northern Atlantic Ocean. They hope to create models to better understand climate change patterns.

From Space

Launched last year, the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich spacecraft began a five-and-a-half-year prime mission to collect the most accurate data yet on global sea level and how our oceans are rising in response to climate change. Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich is just one of many satellites monitoring the ocean from space. Together with other Earth-observing spacecraft, the mission will also collect precise data of atmospheric temperature and humidity to help improve weather forecasts and climate models.

Finding Eddies

Download Eddies Coloring Page
The ocean is full of eddies – swirling water masses that look like hurricanes in the atmosphere. Eddies are often hot spots for biological activity that plays an important role in absorbing carbon. . We find eddies by looking for small changes in the height of the ocean surface, using multiple satellites continuously orbiting Earth. We also look at eddies up close, using ships and planes to study their role in the carbon cycle.

Monitoring Aerosols and Clouds

Clouds coloring interactive here

Aerosols coloring interactive here

Tiny particles in the air called aerosols interact with clouds. These interactions are some of the most poorly understood components of Earth’s climate system. Clouds and aerosols can absorb, scatter or reflect incoming radiation – heat and light from the Sun – depending on their type, abundance and locations in the atmosphere. We’re building new instruments to better understand aerosols and contribute to air quality forecasts.

The Ocean in Living Color
Download PACE coloring page here

The Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission will continue and greatly advance observations of global ocean color, biogeochemistry, and ecology, as well as Earth’s carbon cycle and atmospheric aerosols and clouds. It’s set to launch in late 2023 to early 2024. Want to learn more? Click here to see how PACE will collect data and here to see what PACE will see through our coloring interactives. (Make sure to check out the hidden surprises in both!)

Exploring Ocean Worlds on Earth and Beyond

Download Clouds coloring page here

Using our understanding of oceans on Earth, we also study oceans on other planets. Mars, for example, contains water frozen in the ice caps or trapped beneath the soil. But there’s even more water out there. Planets and moons in our solar system and beyond have giant oceans on their surface. Saturn’s moon Enceladus is thought to have a massive ocean under its frozen surface, which sometimes sprays into space through massive fissures in the ice.

Learn more about ocean worlds here: nasa.gov/oceanworlds

Interested in learning more about how NASA studies oceans? Follow @NASAClimate, @NASAOcean and @NASAEarth.

You can also find all the coloring pages and interactives here.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com.

Source : NASA More   

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