Justin Trudeau drops Marc Garneau from cabinet, but won’t say why

OTTAWA—He is a former astronaut and naval officer with high schools named after him, a front-line government minister who was just re-elected by the people of Notre-Dame-de-Grace—Westmount. And now he’s out of a cabinet job.On Tuesday morning, as a parade of Liberal MPs strode through the pounding rain to get sworn in as cabinet ministers at Rideau Hall, Marc Garneau was nowhere to be found.After just nine months on the job, Garneau was replaced as Canada’s foreign affairs minister by Mélanie Joly, a fellow Montreal MP who took over the role in a major political promotion. Garneau, 72, is one of three ministers who were re-elected in last month’s federal election but not named by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to the new cabinet that will lead his government in its third mandate in Parliament since the Liberals came to power in 2015. The others — Waterloo MP Bardish Chagger and Manitoba’s Jim Carr — held relatively junior portfolios.But Garneau was Canada’s minister of Global Affairs, a front-bench role at the heart of cabinet from which he directed the country’s foreign policy and relations with other countries. Trudeau dodged the question when he was asked Tuesday why he’d excluded Garneau from his new cabinet, instead thanking Garneau and saying he is happy that Garneau is still a Liberal MP. But he added that he is glad to showcase new cabinet members who can tackle the challenges Canada faces. “It’s never easy to assemble the right cabinet for the moment, but I find the team that is around me today is the right one for the situation and for the years to come,” Trudeau said in French. In a written statement to the Star, Garneau said it was “an honour and a privilege to serve my country” as a cabinet minister since 2015, and thanked his Liberal colleagues, staff and public servants who worked with him, family and the constituents in his Montreal riding. One senior government official, who spoke on the condition that they not be identified, said Trudeau’s decision to remove Garneau must have been “tough” because he did an “unbelievable job” as foreign minister. Garneau was credited with helping secure the release of the two Canadians imprisoned in China after the arrest in Vancouver of Chinese executive Meng Wanzhou, and quarterbacked an international declaration against arbitrary detentions that was signed by more than 60 countries. He also had a “smooth” relationship with the Prime Minister’s Office, the official said.“I don’t see it as a knock on his performance or anything,” the official said. “I know he was great at his job.”Before he entered politics, Garneau had a distinguished and high-profile career that saw him become the first Canadian in space when he was selected to join a crew of the U.S. space shuttle in 1984. He later became an astronaut training specialist for NASA and went back to space in 1996 and 2000. Garneau was first elected as a Liberal MP in 2008, when the party was in opposition. He ran against Trudeau for the Liberal leadership but dropped out of the race a month before it ended in the spring of 2013, calling it a “fait accompli” that his main rival would win.When Trudeau became prime minister two years later, he named Garneau to his first cabinet as transport minister, a role he remained in until January 2021, when he was shuffled to foreign affairs.Colin Robertson, a former career diplomat and vice-president of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, said it makes sense to replace Garneau with Joly, who he described as a “new face” who can take a fresh crack at fulfilling Trudeau’s vision for Canada to play a larger role on the world stage.Robertson also noted that Garneau is from a different generation than Trudeau, while Joly might have skills that mesh more with the direction the prime minister wants to take on major international issues.“I think Trudeau wanted somebody who’s more reflective of how he sees Canada in the world,” Robertson said. “The prime minister has to be comfortable with his ministers.” Yet Joly becomes Trudeau’s fifth foreign minister in just six years, which is “an issue” for a cabinet position that benefits from continuity and deep knowledge of complex global issues, said Roland Paris, a former foreign policy adviser to Trudeau and professor of international affairs at the University of Ottawa. “Canada faces very significant and complicated challenges,” Paris said, “and the leadership of that department needs to have a firm hand on the tiller. And it is a complex set of issues that takes a while to absorb.”Both Paris and Robertson noted that Joly will quickly face key challenges in the job, including navigating a dispute with the U.S. state of Michigan over the threatened closure of Line 5, a vital oil pipeline that supplies central Canada, as well as crafting a new strategy to deal with China and other countries in the Pacific region. Alex Ballingall is an Ottawa-based reporter covering federal politics for the Star. Follow him on Twitter: @aballinga

Justin Trudeau drops Marc Garneau from cabinet, but won’t say why

OTTAWA—He is a former astronaut and naval officer with high schools named after him, a front-line government minister who was just re-elected by the people of Notre-Dame-de-Grace—Westmount.

And now he’s out of a cabinet job.

On Tuesday morning, as a parade of Liberal MPs strode through the pounding rain to get sworn in as cabinet ministers at Rideau Hall, Marc Garneau was nowhere to be found.

After just nine months on the job, Garneau was replaced as Canada’s foreign affairs minister by Mélanie Joly, a fellow Montreal MP who took over the role in a major political promotion.

Garneau, 72, is one of three ministers who were re-elected in last month’s federal election but not named by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to the new cabinet that will lead his government in its third mandate in Parliament since the Liberals came to power in 2015. The others — Waterloo MP Bardish Chagger and Manitoba’s Jim Carr — held relatively junior portfolios.

But Garneau was Canada’s minister of Global Affairs, a front-bench role at the heart of cabinet from which he directed the country’s foreign policy and relations with other countries.

Trudeau dodged the question when he was asked Tuesday why he’d excluded Garneau from his new cabinet, instead thanking Garneau and saying he is happy that Garneau is still a Liberal MP. But he added that he is glad to showcase new cabinet members who can tackle the challenges Canada faces.

“It’s never easy to assemble the right cabinet for the moment, but I find the team that is around me today is the right one for the situation and for the years to come,” Trudeau said in French.

In a written statement to the Star, Garneau said it was “an honour and a privilege to serve my country” as a cabinet minister since 2015, and thanked his Liberal colleagues, staff and public servants who worked with him, family and the constituents in his Montreal riding.

One senior government official, who spoke on the condition that they not be identified, said Trudeau’s decision to remove Garneau must have been “tough” because he did an “unbelievable job” as foreign minister. Garneau was credited with helping secure the release of the two Canadians imprisoned in China after the arrest in Vancouver of Chinese executive Meng Wanzhou, and quarterbacked an international declaration against arbitrary detentions that was signed by more than 60 countries.

He also had a “smooth” relationship with the Prime Minister’s Office, the official said.

“I don’t see it as a knock on his performance or anything,” the official said. “I know he was great at his job.”

Before he entered politics, Garneau had a distinguished and high-profile career that saw him become the first Canadian in space when he was selected to join a crew of the U.S. space shuttle in 1984. He later became an astronaut training specialist for NASA and went back to space in 1996 and 2000.

Garneau was first elected as a Liberal MP in 2008, when the party was in opposition. He ran against Trudeau for the Liberal leadership but dropped out of the race a month before it ended in the spring of 2013, calling it a “fait accompli” that his main rival would win.

When Trudeau became prime minister two years later, he named Garneau to his first cabinet as transport minister, a role he remained in until January 2021, when he was shuffled to foreign affairs.

Colin Robertson, a former career diplomat and vice-president of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, said it makes sense to replace Garneau with Joly, who he described as a “new face” who can take a fresh crack at fulfilling Trudeau’s vision for Canada to play a larger role on the world stage.

Robertson also noted that Garneau is from a different generation than Trudeau, while Joly might have skills that mesh more with the direction the prime minister wants to take on major international issues.

“I think Trudeau wanted somebody who’s more reflective of how he sees Canada in the world,” Robertson said. “The prime minister has to be comfortable with his ministers.”

Yet Joly becomes Trudeau’s fifth foreign minister in just six years, which is “an issue” for a cabinet position that benefits from continuity and deep knowledge of complex global issues, said Roland Paris, a former foreign policy adviser to Trudeau and professor of international affairs at the University of Ottawa.

“Canada faces very significant and complicated challenges,” Paris said, “and the leadership of that department needs to have a firm hand on the tiller. And it is a complex set of issues that takes a while to absorb.”

Both Paris and Robertson noted that Joly will quickly face key challenges in the job, including navigating a dispute with the U.S. state of Michigan over the threatened closure of Line 5, a vital oil pipeline that supplies central Canada, as well as crafting a new strategy to deal with China and other countries in the Pacific region.

Alex Ballingall is an Ottawa-based reporter covering federal politics for the Star. Follow him on Twitter: @aballinga

Source : Toronto Star More   

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Alberta says ‘no’ to permanent daylight-saving time, putting it out of step with other provinces

EDMONTON—Albertans narrowly voted against switching to permanent daylight-saving time this week even while other provinces have decided the time is right to stop changing clocks twice a year.The results in Alberta were within a sliver of each other — the “yes” to permanent daylight-saving time side received 49.8 per cent support while the “no” side got 50.2 per cent, according to Elections Alberta, which released the numbers from last week’s referendum on Tuesday.That means every year, Albertans will continue to move their clocks forward an hour in spring and back an hour in the fall (this is known as the spring forward, fall back model). Alberta Premier Jason Kenney’s government has indicated it will respect the wish of voters.However, they’ll be out of line with neighbours B.C. and Saskatchewan. Ontario, is also on the cusp of making the switch to permanent daylight-saving time.As far as sleep experts are concerned, Albertans chose right on this one while other provinces may see an increase in health consequences and accidents in their new permanent daylight-saving time world.Those same experts argue most people would be better off living on standard time instead of daylight-saving time — the hours used for summer.Patricia Lakin-Thomas, a biologist at York University, says the only reason it’s appealing to some is that “people have more light in the afternoon” to enjoy activities.Lakin-Thomas said everyone from golfers wanting more time on the golf course to officials wanting to conserve energy during the Second World War have liked the idea of daylight-saving time, but that “it never had any benefits.” Nor did it end up conserving energy, she added.“It’s absolutely the wrong thing to be doing in the winter when people forget that if it’s light later in the afternoon, it’s also sunrise later in the morning,” she said.She said to imagine the practical implications for going to work and school.“Staying on summertime — daylight-saving time — all year round means the sun will not rise in a place like Toronto until 9 a.m.,” Lakin-Thomas said.“In parts of Alberta, the sun isn’t going to rise until about 10 a.m. (on permanent daylight-saving time).”Michael Antle, a professor of psychology at the University of Calgary, says standard time matches people’s circadian rhythm better than daylight-saving time.“Our body clock has to follow the sun, and that’s the only thing it can do,” he said. “When your social clock is offset from what the sun is doing, then that leads to what they call social jet lag.“That’s when diseases can increase, on the job accidents can increase and people just aren’t functioning optimally,” he added.Research has found that people can experience higher rates of obesity, heart disease and diabetes if the circadian rhythm is out of line, said Antle. “People who have later sunsets sleep less,” he said. But what Antle is more concerned about is collisions. In the winter, people will be getting up before their circadian clock is ready, he said.“That’s going to have sleepy workers, sleepy students and sleepy drivers,” he said.Ontario is currently waiting to proclaim a bill it passed in 2020 that would also see exactly it move to permanent daylight-saving time. In a statement to the Star, Ministry of the Attorney General spokesperson Kerstie Schreyer said Ontario would proclaim the bill — Bill 214, Time Amendment Act, 2020 — once neighbouring jurisdictions such as Quebec and New York also make the switch.This would be done to “ensure coordination in areas such as trade, the stock markets and broadcasting,” said Schreyer.Like Alberta, B.C. also put the daylight-saving time question to its citizens, although in a survey.An overwhelming majority of respondents said “yes” in 2019, with 93 per cent supporting the move to permanent daylight savings. Premier John Horgan’s government passed legislation that would slot the province in line with neighbouring U.S. states.In the U.S., some of those states, such as Washington and Oregon, also signalled the desire to switch, but time changes like that must be approved by the federal government.B.C.’s switch to permanent daylight-saving time has been pushed ahead due to the COVID-19 crisis.Saskatchewan already effectively observes daylight-saving time and doesn’t switch its clocks, making things awkward for residents of Lloydminster, a town that straddles the Albertan border with Saskatchewan. The town of roughly 30,000 falls out of step with Saskatchewan for much of the year when it changes its clocks in line with Alberta.Kieran Leavitt is an Edmonton-based political reporter for the Toronto Star. Follow him on Twitter: @kieranleavitt

Alberta says ‘no’ to permanent daylight-saving time, putting it out of step with other provinces

EDMONTON—Albertans narrowly voted against switching to permanent daylight-saving time this week even while other provinces have decided the time is right to stop changing clocks twice a year.

The results in Alberta were within a sliver of each other — the “yes” to permanent daylight-saving time side received 49.8 per cent support while the “no” side got 50.2 per cent, according to Elections Alberta, which released the numbers from last week’s referendum on Tuesday.

That means every year, Albertans will continue to move their clocks forward an hour in spring and back an hour in the fall (this is known as the spring forward, fall back model). Alberta Premier Jason Kenney’s government has indicated it will respect the wish of voters.

However, they’ll be out of line with neighbours B.C. and Saskatchewan. Ontario, is also on the cusp of making the switch to permanent daylight-saving time.

As far as sleep experts are concerned, Albertans chose right on this one while other provinces may see an increase in health consequences and accidents in their new permanent daylight-saving time world.

Those same experts argue most people would be better off living on standard time instead of daylight-saving time — the hours used for summer.

Patricia Lakin-Thomas, a biologist at York University, says the only reason it’s appealing to some is that “people have more light in the afternoon” to enjoy activities.

Lakin-Thomas said everyone from golfers wanting more time on the golf course to officials wanting to conserve energy during the Second World War have liked the idea of daylight-saving time, but that “it never had any benefits.” Nor did it end up conserving energy, she added.

“It’s absolutely the wrong thing to be doing in the winter when people forget that if it’s light later in the afternoon, it’s also sunrise later in the morning,” she said.

She said to imagine the practical implications for going to work and school.

“Staying on summertime — daylight-saving time — all year round means the sun will not rise in a place like Toronto until 9 a.m.,” Lakin-Thomas said.

“In parts of Alberta, the sun isn’t going to rise until about 10 a.m. (on permanent daylight-saving time).”

Michael Antle, a professor of psychology at the University of Calgary, says standard time matches people’s circadian rhythm better than daylight-saving time.

“Our body clock has to follow the sun, and that’s the only thing it can do,” he said. “When your social clock is offset from what the sun is doing, then that leads to what they call social jet lag.

“That’s when diseases can increase, on the job accidents can increase and people just aren’t functioning optimally,” he added.

Research has found that people can experience higher rates of obesity, heart disease and diabetes if the circadian rhythm is out of line, said Antle.

“People who have later sunsets sleep less,” he said.

But what Antle is more concerned about is collisions. In the winter, people will be getting up before their circadian clock is ready, he said.

“That’s going to have sleepy workers, sleepy students and sleepy drivers,” he said.

Ontario is currently waiting to proclaim a bill it passed in 2020 that would also see exactly it move to permanent daylight-saving time.

In a statement to the Star, Ministry of the Attorney General spokesperson Kerstie Schreyer said Ontario would proclaim the bill — Bill 214, Time Amendment Act, 2020 — once neighbouring jurisdictions such as Quebec and New York also make the switch.

This would be done to “ensure coordination in areas such as trade, the stock markets and broadcasting,” said Schreyer.

Like Alberta, B.C. also put the daylight-saving time question to its citizens, although in a survey.

An overwhelming majority of respondents said “yes” in 2019, with 93 per cent supporting the move to permanent daylight savings. Premier John Horgan’s government passed legislation that would slot the province in line with neighbouring U.S. states.

In the U.S., some of those states, such as Washington and Oregon, also signalled the desire to switch, but time changes like that must be approved by the federal government.

B.C.’s switch to permanent daylight-saving time has been pushed ahead due to the COVID-19 crisis.

Saskatchewan already effectively observes daylight-saving time and doesn’t switch its clocks, making things awkward for residents of Lloydminster, a town that straddles the Albertan border with Saskatchewan.

The town of roughly 30,000 falls out of step with Saskatchewan for much of the year when it changes its clocks in line with Alberta.

Kieran Leavitt is an Edmonton-based political reporter for the Toronto Star. Follow him on Twitter: @kieranleavitt

Source : Toronto Star More   

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