Kairos – stunning and timeless superyachting

Phil Draper reports on Kairos a 90m concept which debuted at the Monaco Yacht Show, designed to operate much of the time with zero environmental impact Oceanco’s latest concept Kairos takes ‘sustainable yachting’ to a whole new level. This 90m what-could-be vision debuted at the Monaco Yacht Show in September. The design reimagines how space aboard can be utilised and how sustainable yachting can be and how it can develop into the future for right-minded owners. Kairos is the result of […] This article Kairos – stunning and timeless superyachting appeared first on Motor Boat & Yachting.

Kairos – stunning and timeless superyachting

Phil Draper reports on Kairos a 90m concept which debuted at the Monaco Yacht Show, designed to operate much of the time with zero environmental impact

Oceanco’s latest concept Kairos takes ‘sustainable yachting’ to a whole new level. This 90m what-could-be vision debuted at the Monaco Yacht Show in September. The design reimagines how space aboard can be utilised and how sustainable yachting can be and how it can develop into the future for right-minded owners.

Kairos is the result of a creative huddle between the Dutch gigayacht builder’s ‘NXT’ think tank, the naval architects at Lateral in the UK, and that Italian design and engineering giant Pininfarina, which has not only been responsible for some of the world’s most iconic car creations of the past nine decades, but has also been regularly making waves in the marine industry, not least recently working with Princess on its foiling R35 and more radically styled X Series motor yachts.

In terms of onboard spaces, Kairos proposes an alternative interaction between guests and crew, especially less segregation. All the usual features will be there, of course – everything from palatial cabins, lounges and dining areas inside and out, not to mention balconies and beach clubs, helicopter capabilities and garages packed with tenders and toys – but at the heart of the yacht think Italian ‘piazza’, an open meeting space with views to the sky.

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Everywhere else the use of glass opens up share spaces in fabulous new ways. Think walking down a sidewalk in New York and looking up at the skyscrapers and sky, says Kevin Rice, Pinifarina’s chief creative officer. Walk through this boat, he says, and you will look up and see the decks above and the mast towering above. Then look to one side and you see the sea and to the other family space or a restaurant. This is the special thinking behind the very special Kairos experience.

An important starting point in the creative process was to not think about boats, says Rice, because boats are about moving from somewhere to somewhere. A key goal with this project was to pause the conventional passage of time, to create a timeless environment, where various aspects of life can co-exist – work, family and play – and regardless of where the yacht happens to be in the world.

Is this just another whacky concept? Oceanco is emphatic it represents an authentic step forward, meaning what is proposed could actually be built today with present technologies.

Instead of suggesting an infeasible net zero environmental impact all of the time, which is not possible presently, the Kairos ‘E-Hybrid’ solution could realistically operate for 70% of the day with zero impact, says James Roy, managing director at Lateral.

Perhaps more important still is this design’s ability to adapt as technology and expectations evolve, especially as regards developments in battery technology. Such things will become increasingly important now as cruising grounds begin to restrict access for polluting vessels. Roy says, while they aspire to “total zero” which isn’t yet possible, they can already deliver “local zero”.

Although capable of becoming a reality, Kairos has not been developed with any one client in mind. Rather it is intended to appeal to more people and probably more younger people than Oceanco’s traditional gigayacht clientele, and especially those with a genuine interest in sustainability and perhaps that coming to yachting without the usual preconceptions. It is about fostering the right sort of conversations.

Kairos incidentally is a Greek word and effectively translates as ‘timely’.

This article Kairos – stunning and timeless superyachting appeared first on Motor Boat & Yachting.

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What to Look For In Center-Console Helm Seats

Here are some important things to look at for helm seats when buying a center console.

What to Look For In Center-Console Helm Seats

Flip-up bolsters and armrests are must-have creature comforts on today’s center consoles. (Courtesy Llebroc/)

The transition to boats with open deck space and outboard power over the past few years has led to a profound transformation of the traditional center-console helm seating. Once just a spartan, barely cushioned leaning post meant only for (you guessed it) leaning against, today the modern “leaning post” is more of a luxury item meant to provide comfort and function to the captain and crew alike. Several companies such as Taco Marine and Llebroc offer high-end seats and helm stations for both OEM and aftermarket customers. We touched base with Nicholas Covey, the sales and marketing manager of Llebroc. Based on his input as well as our extensive boat-test research, here’s what to look for in the helm seating on center consoles.

Flip-Up Bolsters

Any good helm seating should allow the captain the option of standing or sitting while working the wheel and throttles. A quality hinged flip-up bolster lets the captain easily choose and adjust while on the water. Look for them in the co-captain and additional crew seats as well.

Flip-Up Armrests

Flip-up armrests are another important upgrade in the comfort level of modern helm stations. But they have to have solid construction to withstand bearing the user’s weight when down, as well as sometimes acting as a handhold in rough seas. “We were the first to use metal frames, and that’s become an industry standard,” Covey says.

Quality Foam Cushioning

Look for seats with quality foam that is both durable and comfortable, doesn’t retain water, and returns to shape after heavy use. Builders can use high-density, closed-cell or medium-density foams, but it’s important that they possess antimicrobial properties and can return to form.

Marine-Grade Vinyl

While pretty much every builder uses marine-grade vinyl, some hold up better in harsh boating environments. Companies such as Llebroc will work with the builder or owner to find the right match for a particular boat. “We do extensive testing to make sure our vinyls stand up to mold, mildew and bacteria, and that they resist pinking,” Covey says.

Seats with high backs and lumbar support are ideal for use at the helm.
Seats with high backs and lumbar support are ideal for use at the helm. (Courtesy Llebroc/)

Flip-Down Toe Rail

For most people who sit at the helm station, the seats are too high off the deck for them to place their feet firmly down on the deck. Underway, it can be extremely uncomfortable to deal with ­dangling feet. Flip-down toe rests allow the captain and crew to keep a secure foothold while seated, and easily stow out of the way for those who want to stand. It’s better to have independent rails or footholds for each seat.

Adjustable Bases

Look for each individual seat to have an adjustable base that allows the user to move it up or down as well as fore and aft to meet personal comfort needs. Many high-end center consoles have seats that can swivel to face aft so the captain and his first mate can join the cockpit conversation while at anchor.

Read Next: Installing an Adjustable Pedestal Seating System for a Boat

Passenger Holds

Helm-seat systems should have some type of handholds for passengers who are sitting or standing around the console to grab in rough seas. Look for strategically placed handles, or rails around the leaning post and built into the T-top.

Source : Boating Magazine More   

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