Kevin Lee regrets not applying for exemption to avoid Adderall suspension: ‘I’m still kicking myself in the ass over it’

Esther Lin, MMA FightingKevin Lee is stinging over a suspension that he knows he could have avoided. “The Motown Phenom” was recently suspended for six months by the Nevada Athletic Commission after testing positive for Adderall, a banned substance that he was using to treat ADHD. The test stemmed from an Aug. 28 welterweight bout against Daniel Rodriguez that Lee lost by unanimous decision. Appearing on The MMA Hour on Monday, Lee said that he made the mistake of not applying for a therapeutic-use exemption (TUE) as he had hoped it would simply be out of his system by the time the Rodriguez fight came around. “It wouldn’t have been an issue, but I got a little arrogant in it,” Lee said. “I thought that I would be fine without it, and that it just would get out of my system much faster. But I think not cutting as much weight – I should have applied for the TUE. I’m still kind of kicking myself in the ass over it because it’s a legit prescription, it’s a legit diagnosis and I think I just went about it in an unprofessional way to get that done.” According to Lee, he was diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in 2018 and simply fought through it until 2020 when he was prescribed Adderall; he sought out the prescription as he recovered from a second knee surgery. He realized he needed help to manage his condition with recovery leaving him unable to train and compete, which was how he had dealt with his ADHD in the past. Although the drug was beneficial, Lee doesn’t completely agree that it’s a performance-enhancing drug. “It’s not a performance-enhancer at least from what I can tell from it, from using it,” Lee said. “It definitely worked. It enhances life for sure, and it helped me to solve a lot of issues that I’ve been dealing with for a very, very long time. It definitely helps you in life, but I don’t necessarily know if it ever helped make me bigger, faster, stronger, or even focus more during the fight. “I think that’s one of the things you can even see during that fight is I kind of lost that focus in the second round and I wish I could have been on it. I probably should have just smoked weed or something, then it probably would have been a whole lot better.” Shortly after news broke of his suspension, Lee released a video in which he poured a bottle of pills down a drain. View this post on Instagram A post shared by Kevin Lee (@motownphenom) His plan going forward is to no longer use Adderall. He is also reducing the amount of alcohol he consumes in his spare time, which he says was an issue for him when he wasn’t actively involved in a fight camp. “Not in training camp, I’ve always been disciplined during training camp because it was six weeks or sometimes four weeks or whatever it is,” Lee said of his heavy drinking. “I’m just a disciplined person, I feel like, so I know when to stop. “The problem came when there is no fights coming up. And it’s just like, OK, I’m just around, I don’t really have to train that hard tomorrow, so why not? That’s the part that I really want to cut off and cut back on.” Lee went on to explain that he suffers from a lack of focus and constantly needs to find stimulation, which he thinks is a common problem among many adults who might be dealing with undiagnosed ADHD. “ADHD I think is one of those things that kind of gets tossed out a lot,” Lee said. “I think a lot of people kind of have it, but for some, it’s more extreme than others. For me, I lose track of every f*cking thing, and I’ve kind of always been that way and kind of always only been interested in the things that really, really interest me, or if it’s a life-or-death type of situation. “But that’s not always the best way to be as an adult, you’ve got to be interested in things that you can’t do. So when I couldn’t train and I couldn’t just fight my way out of it and just focus only on the gym, that’s when some of those issues really came to the forefront. It’s just something that I needed to do to enhance my mental health and quit ignoring it all the time and just kind of drowning it in the fight.” Lee’s six-month suspension is retroactive to August, so the earliest that he will be able to compete again is in February of next year. As he sits on the shelf, Lee isn’t too worried about whether a drug suspension will result in fans labeling him as a cheater – he was more worried about how others would react to knowing that he has ADHD. It was a concern that was assuaged by a few conversations with people who shared similar stories with him. “It was definitely embarrassing,” Lee said. “I still am just a little bit, but it was more so embarrassing to tell people what’s actually wrong with me, you know? But since I came out with it last week, I felt a little bit better. The reception to it has been better than I expected. “I was expecting more people to kick me while I was down, but I’ve had a whole lot of people that I actually respect that have reached ou

Kevin Lee regrets not applying for exemption to avoid Adderall suspension: ‘I’m still kicking myself in the ass over it’
Esther Lin, MMA Fighting

Kevin Lee is stinging over a suspension that he knows he could have avoided.

“The Motown Phenom” was recently suspended for six months by the Nevada Athletic Commission after testing positive for Adderall, a banned substance that he was using to treat ADHD. The test stemmed from an Aug. 28 welterweight bout against Daniel Rodriguez that Lee lost by unanimous decision.

Appearing on The MMA Hour on Monday, Lee said that he made the mistake of not applying for a therapeutic-use exemption (TUE) as he had hoped it would simply be out of his system by the time the Rodriguez fight came around.

“It wouldn’t have been an issue, but I got a little arrogant in it,” Lee said. “I thought that I would be fine without it, and that it just would get out of my system much faster. But I think not cutting as much weight – I should have applied for the TUE. I’m still kind of kicking myself in the ass over it because it’s a legit prescription, it’s a legit diagnosis and I think I just went about it in an unprofessional way to get that done.”

According to Lee, he was diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in 2018 and simply fought through it until 2020 when he was prescribed Adderall; he sought out the prescription as he recovered from a second knee surgery. He realized he needed help to manage his condition with recovery leaving him unable to train and compete, which was how he had dealt with his ADHD in the past.

Although the drug was beneficial, Lee doesn’t completely agree that it’s a performance-enhancing drug.

“It’s not a performance-enhancer at least from what I can tell from it, from using it,” Lee said. “It definitely worked. It enhances life for sure, and it helped me to solve a lot of issues that I’ve been dealing with for a very, very long time. It definitely helps you in life, but I don’t necessarily know if it ever helped make me bigger, faster, stronger, or even focus more during the fight.

“I think that’s one of the things you can even see during that fight is I kind of lost that focus in the second round and I wish I could have been on it. I probably should have just smoked weed or something, then it probably would have been a whole lot better.”

Shortly after news broke of his suspension, Lee released a video in which he poured a bottle of pills down a drain.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Kevin Lee (@motownphenom)

His plan going forward is to no longer use Adderall. He is also reducing the amount of alcohol he consumes in his spare time, which he says was an issue for him when he wasn’t actively involved in a fight camp.

“Not in training camp, I’ve always been disciplined during training camp because it was six weeks or sometimes four weeks or whatever it is,” Lee said of his heavy drinking. “I’m just a disciplined person, I feel like, so I know when to stop.

“The problem came when there is no fights coming up. And it’s just like, OK, I’m just around, I don’t really have to train that hard tomorrow, so why not? That’s the part that I really want to cut off and cut back on.”

Lee went on to explain that he suffers from a lack of focus and constantly needs to find stimulation, which he thinks is a common problem among many adults who might be dealing with undiagnosed ADHD.

“ADHD I think is one of those things that kind of gets tossed out a lot,” Lee said. “I think a lot of people kind of have it, but for some, it’s more extreme than others. For me, I lose track of every f*cking thing, and I’ve kind of always been that way and kind of always only been interested in the things that really, really interest me, or if it’s a life-or-death type of situation.

“But that’s not always the best way to be as an adult, you’ve got to be interested in things that you can’t do. So when I couldn’t train and I couldn’t just fight my way out of it and just focus only on the gym, that’s when some of those issues really came to the forefront. It’s just something that I needed to do to enhance my mental health and quit ignoring it all the time and just kind of drowning it in the fight.”

Lee’s six-month suspension is retroactive to August, so the earliest that he will be able to compete again is in February of next year.

As he sits on the shelf, Lee isn’t too worried about whether a drug suspension will result in fans labeling him as a cheater – he was more worried about how others would react to knowing that he has ADHD. It was a concern that was assuaged by a few conversations with people who shared similar stories with him.

“It was definitely embarrassing,” Lee said. “I still am just a little bit, but it was more so embarrassing to tell people what’s actually wrong with me, you know? But since I came out with it last week, I felt a little bit better. The reception to it has been better than I expected.

“I was expecting more people to kick me while I was down, but I’ve had a whole lot of people that I actually respect that have reached out to me and said that they deal with the same issues. I think that it just doesn’t get talked about a lot. So it was a little embarrassing for me to talk about it, but I’m less embarrassed than the actual issue itself these days.”

Source : MMA Fighting More   

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Petr Yan: After I win at UFC 267, everyone ‘will know who here is really champ’

Photo by Jeff Bottari/Zuffa LLCPetr Yan is out to make a statement against Cory Sandhagen. The former UFC bantamweight champion returns Saturday in the co-main event of UFC 267 to fight for the first time since dropping his belt in controversial fashion to Aljamain Sterling in March. With Sterling still sidelined due to injury for the foreseeable future, an interim bantamweight title will be up for grabs in Abu Dhabi. And Yan knows well enough that the unusual circumstances around the current 135-pound title picture give his showdown with Sandhagen quite a bit more significance than the UFC’s normal interim title bouts. “I beat [Sandhagen] on Saturday, every guy will know who here is really champ,” Yan said in English without the help of a translator on Monday’s episode of The MMA Hour. The 135-pound division has been stuck in neutral since Yan collided with Sterling at UFC 259. Back in March, Yan was ahead on the scorecards and had seized momentum late in the fourth round when he unloaded an illegal knee to Sterling’s head while the American was a grounded fighter. The incident lead to a DQ win for Sterling and caused Yan to become the only athlete in UFC history to lose a title by disqualification. Sterling underwent neck surgery following the incident and remains medically unfit to compete. He was supposed to rematch Yan at UFC 267 but ended up withdrawing last month due to lingering issues and ultimately was replaced on short notice by Sandhagen. The situation between Sterling and Yan has been litigated and relitigated hundreds of times since March, and Yan insisted that he won’t do it again this week with a tough challenge like Sandhagen sitting in front of him. But Yan also made it clear that he puts the blame on Sterling as to why the UFC bantamweight division finds itself in the mess it’s in now. “It’s just his decision to make this surgery right now,” Yan said through a translator. “I don’t know why he hadn’t done it earlier or maybe later in his career, but now the whole division is in a mess. When people have neck pain, I don’t see them sparring without any headgear. It’s just ridiculous.” Despite his convoluted history with Sterling, Yan said he will “1,000 percent” consider himself to be the true UFC bantamweight champion with a win on Saturday. But he’s also not there just yet. “I don’t want to consider myself as a champion,” Yan said. “I don’t have a belt. Right now I’m the No. 1-ranked bantamweight in the division and I’m ready to prove that I’m the best in the division. “The only thing I lost [after UFC 259] was maybe money, but everything else is still with me — desire to win the belt, desire to move forward to winning, and I’m still hungry. So everything else is the same.” Altogether, Yan was in good spirits Monday night in Abu Dhabi. He indicated that he’s content with where things ended up despite his long road since March’s loss. He felt that the judges were correct to award T.J. Dillashaw a win over Sandhagen in July’s controversial split decision between the two bantamweights, but he knows that Sandhagen was still the best option available for UFC 267 considering Dillashaw’s own injury woes. Yan also scoffed at the public attempts of bantamweight prospect Sean O’Malley to secure the interim title fight before the UFC settled on Sandhagen. “Right now he knows it’s impossible for him to get this fight, so everything he says now is just for attention. It’s just to be in media,” Yan said of O’Malley. “But the only reason why he’s in the media is only the color of his hair. “It’s the main reason he gets attention, his crazy hair and his crazy talk. He’s not even in the top 15.” As for Sandhagen, the American has won seven of his nine UFC appearances and remains one of the most well-rounded contenders at 135 pounds. The 29-year-old has been hailed by many observers as a future champion of the division. But even if Saturday’s matchup looks daunting, Yan hasn’t found much to be concerned about when he sees his foe. “He’s a very good and versatile fighter. He’s good everywhere. But in every aspect that he’s good at, I am better than him,” Yan said. “So in wrestling or striking, I’m ready to surprise him. “My style is to always go in there and look for the finish, and I don’t think he’s the one who drag me into the deep waters. I’m the one who’s going to drag him into the deep waters. And five rounds is my distance.”

Petr Yan: After I win at UFC 267, everyone ‘will know who here is really champ’
Photo by Jeff Bottari/Zuffa LLC

Petr Yan is out to make a statement against Cory Sandhagen.

The former UFC bantamweight champion returns Saturday in the co-main event of UFC 267 to fight for the first time since dropping his belt in controversial fashion to Aljamain Sterling in March. With Sterling still sidelined due to injury for the foreseeable future, an interim bantamweight title will be up for grabs in Abu Dhabi. And Yan knows well enough that the unusual circumstances around the current 135-pound title picture give his showdown with Sandhagen quite a bit more significance than the UFC’s normal interim title bouts.

“I beat [Sandhagen] on Saturday, every guy will know who here is really champ,” Yan said in English without the help of a translator on Monday’s episode of The MMA Hour.

The 135-pound division has been stuck in neutral since Yan collided with Sterling at UFC 259. Back in March, Yan was ahead on the scorecards and had seized momentum late in the fourth round when he unloaded an illegal knee to Sterling’s head while the American was a grounded fighter. The incident lead to a DQ win for Sterling and caused Yan to become the only athlete in UFC history to lose a title by disqualification.

Sterling underwent neck surgery following the incident and remains medically unfit to compete. He was supposed to rematch Yan at UFC 267 but ended up withdrawing last month due to lingering issues and ultimately was replaced on short notice by Sandhagen.

The situation between Sterling and Yan has been litigated and relitigated hundreds of times since March, and Yan insisted that he won’t do it again this week with a tough challenge like Sandhagen sitting in front of him. But Yan also made it clear that he puts the blame on Sterling as to why the UFC bantamweight division finds itself in the mess it’s in now.

“It’s just his decision to make this surgery right now,” Yan said through a translator. “I don’t know why he hadn’t done it earlier or maybe later in his career, but now the whole division is in a mess. When people have neck pain, I don’t see them sparring without any headgear. It’s just ridiculous.”

Despite his convoluted history with Sterling, Yan said he will “1,000 percent” consider himself to be the true UFC bantamweight champion with a win on Saturday.

But he’s also not there just yet.

“I don’t want to consider myself as a champion,” Yan said. “I don’t have a belt. Right now I’m the No. 1-ranked bantamweight in the division and I’m ready to prove that I’m the best in the division.

“The only thing I lost [after UFC 259] was maybe money, but everything else is still with me — desire to win the belt, desire to move forward to winning, and I’m still hungry. So everything else is the same.”

Altogether, Yan was in good spirits Monday night in Abu Dhabi. He indicated that he’s content with where things ended up despite his long road since March’s loss. He felt that the judges were correct to award T.J. Dillashaw a win over Sandhagen in July’s controversial split decision between the two bantamweights, but he knows that Sandhagen was still the best option available for UFC 267 considering Dillashaw’s own injury woes.

Yan also scoffed at the public attempts of bantamweight prospect Sean O’Malley to secure the interim title fight before the UFC settled on Sandhagen.

“Right now he knows it’s impossible for him to get this fight, so everything he says now is just for attention. It’s just to be in media,” Yan said of O’Malley. “But the only reason why he’s in the media is only the color of his hair.

“It’s the main reason he gets attention, his crazy hair and his crazy talk. He’s not even in the top 15.”

As for Sandhagen, the American has won seven of his nine UFC appearances and remains one of the most well-rounded contenders at 135 pounds. The 29-year-old has been hailed by many observers as a future champion of the division. But even if Saturday’s matchup looks daunting, Yan hasn’t found much to be concerned about when he sees his foe.

“He’s a very good and versatile fighter. He’s good everywhere. But in every aspect that he’s good at, I am better than him,” Yan said. “So in wrestling or striking, I’m ready to surprise him.

“My style is to always go in there and look for the finish, and I don’t think he’s the one who drag me into the deep waters. I’m the one who’s going to drag him into the deep waters. And five rounds is my distance.”

Source : MMA Fighting More   

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