Landlord’s plea: Why won’t police help me evict drug-dealing tenant?

A landlord who’s been waiting for a court to hear his application to evict a drug-dealing tenant ©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - Landlord’s plea: Why won’t police help me evict drug-dealing tenant? | LandlordZONE.

Landlord’s plea: Why won’t police help me evict drug-dealing tenant?

A landlord who’s been waiting for a court to hear his application to evict a drug-dealing tenant for more than a year fears his case could be further delayed due to a lack of police co-operation, he has told LandlordZONE.

CCTV captured the woman letting people into her flat in his serviced accommodation property which was raided by police in 2019.

During subsequent raids, she appeared to be involved in County Lines drugs activities.

The landlord finally managed to get a closure order in August 2020, which flushed out London drug dealers visiting the property, but he says people still regularly turn up to buy drugs, upsetting neighbours.

After serving both a Section 21 and Section 8 notice in October, he finally has a review hearing on Monday, but has struggled to get a police statement that supports his case.

Vulnerable

He tells LandlordZONE: “They’ve promised to send it since the beginning of March but when I finally got one, it only talked about how vulnerable the tenant was and just said we, ‘felt intimidated by the environment’.

It doesn’t mention the anguish we’ve been going through for nearly two years. It’s impacted our business as it’s effectively closed me down, as well as our mental health.”

The landlord is now desperately trying to get the police to provide a more thorough statement and says if they don’t, he won’t bother submitting it to the court.

“It might suggest that I’m making things up in my statement as I’ve provided so much more detail in my report. However, without it, I don’t think it will be enough for the judge to make a decision. I feel so let down – it’s a real slap in the face.”

Please note: The landlord was only happy to talk to LandlordZONE anonymously until his eviction is over.

©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - Landlord’s plea: Why won’t police help me evict drug-dealing tenant? | LandlordZONE.

Source : Landlord Zone More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

LATEST: Rental market to take two years to recover from Covid

Long-term arrears and loss of credit-worthiness among tenants and loss of income and confidence among landlords will ©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - LATEST: Rental market to take two years to recover from Covid | LandlordZONE.

LATEST: Rental market to take two years to recover from Covid

Long-term arrears and loss of credit-worthiness among tenants and loss of income and confidence among landlords will continue to scar the private rented sector until 2023, warns a new landmark report.

Homelessness and rough sleeping in the time of Covid’ finds that the evictions ban has left tenants racking up debt while nothing has been done to help landlords facing significant losses from arrears.

The report – by a research group within the LSE – believes re-starting evictions won’t alleviate the problem for many months.

Lower rental incomes could also lead to a significant restructuring of the private rental sector, making the future even more uncertain.

It adds that normality, even with respect to court proceedings, appears to be at least two years away.

The LSE report says that more than 400,000 private tenants may be in significant rent arrears by the end of 2021 and at risk of eviction if the government lifts its suspension on eviction proceedings from 1st June.

Slow burn until 2023

But it adds that spikes in evictions are highly unlikely; rather there will be a slow burn that will go on at least into 2023.

Currently, 6-7% of tenants appear to be in arrears, which is twice the proportion of a ‘normal’ year.

But large numbers won’t immediately find themselves homeless because the courts simply won’t be able to cope with the cases.

It recommends that greater protections are put in place to protect private tenants and landlords, including immediately stopping ‘no fault’ Section 21 evictions while speeding up court proceedings for extreme cases of failure to pay rent.

It wants the government to support Discretionary Housing Payments and to help those without access to UC but in rent arrears, such as through low interest rate loans.

Dr Nancy Holman (pictured), co-author of the report, says: “Unfortunately, these solutions are partial. In a crisis of this magnitude there are no easy answers. One in five households in England rent, with many having no other option. If we are to avoid catastrophic problems in the future, we must ensure that the private rented sector remains sustainable.”

Read the report.

Read more about arrears.

©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - LATEST: Rental market to take two years to recover from Covid | LandlordZONE.

Source : Landlord Zone More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.