Lee Filters Unveils System Specifically for the Nikon Z 14-24mm f/2.8

Lee Filters has announced a new LEE100 holder designed specifically for the Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-24mm f/2.8 S ultra-wide zoom lens. The new LEE100 for the Nikon mirrorless 14-24mm lens is larger than the standard holders for the 100mm filters and is made from aluminum alloy and features what it describes as a bespoke compression […]

Lee Filters Unveils System Specifically for the Nikon Z 14-24mm f/2.8

Lee Filters has announced a new LEE100 holder designed specifically for the Nikon NIKKOR Z 14-24mm f/2.8 S ultra-wide zoom lens.

The new LEE100 for the Nikon mirrorless 14-24mm lens is larger than the standard holders for the 100mm filters and is made from aluminum alloy and features what it describes as a bespoke compression system that allows for safe and secure placement on the lens barrel. The mount will lock securely on the lens without risking any damage to the barrel or hood mount. The company claims it has an optimized vignette performance by leveraging a set of visual “smart alignment” markings that will help users correctly position the LEE100 Mount on the lens as well as an integrated gasket and anti-reflective coating to protect against any light leaks.

While this is a new filter holder design, it will use the same interchangeable and modular guide blocks as the standard LEE100 system, allowing photographers to continue using any existing LEE 100x100mm or 100x150mm graduated filters they have in their kits. The company claims the system has integrated handling tabs on the filter frames that allow for easy positioning without having to directly touch the filter surface, helping eliminate fingerprints and smudges, while increasing the filter’s usable visible area. The mount also contains a physical stop built into the filter frame to optimize the filter’s position relative to the lens. This will ensure the edge of the filter never accidentally drops into the shot.

The company claims that the new LEE100 system for the Nikon 14-24mm S lens is as strong and lightweight as the rest of the LEE100 line-up, can be attached or removed with just one hand using the spring release, and maintains the twin-slot filter guides that will give users a full 360-degree filter holder rotation. To make the most of this new mount, Lee has also launched a new line of foamless 100mm “Big” and “Little” stoppers. These new versions omit the foam light seal that the standard stoppers have, as it would cause vignetting when used on the Nikon Z 14-24mm f/2.8 S Lens. It is worth noting though, that this system will not be compatible with the LEE100 clip-on circular polarizer.

The new LEE100 filter holder kit for Nikon’s NIKKOR Z 14-24mm f2.8 S is available now for about $208 USD (£149.99), and the new foamless stopper filters are about $168 USD (£121.20) each.

Source : Peta Pixel More   

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Google Pixel 6 Unveiled Unceremoniously in the Online Store

In what appears to be a strangely quiet reveal, Google has listed its new Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro smartphones on the Google Store with zero pomp and circumstance. In early May, a rumor published by Jon Prosser alleged that Google would be dramatically changing its camera design with the Pixel 6 smartphone, and […]

Google Pixel 6 Unveiled Unceremoniously in the Online Store

In what appears to be a strangely quiet reveal, Google has listed its new Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro smartphones on the Google Store with zero pomp and circumstance.

In early May, a rumor published by Jon Prosser alleged that Google would be dramatically changing its camera design with the Pixel 6 smartphone, and it appears his rumors were right on the money. The new phone shares pretty much the exact design leaked by Prosser back then, which is extremely unusual and features a horizontal camera bump that stretches across the upper portion of the rear of the device.

The two phones will come in three colors each. The Pixel 6 will be available in a burnt-orange top two-toned with a peach body, light greenish-yellow paired with a light blueish-gray, and a much more subtle gray mixed with a darker gray. That orange color is very much in line with Prosser’s original leak.

The Pixel 6 Pro will also be available in the same subtle gray mix, but also with a lighter peach top and more yellow body as well as a much lighter gray two-tone mix. The multiple colors can be seen through the Google Store.

While the device appears to have launched with relative quiet, Google has not published much information on what to expect from the phone. As reported by , Google basically has just confirmed the design elements of the phone and now allows prospective buyers to sign up to receive a notification when the phone is able to be purchased.

Other than confirming the design of the new device, Google also revealed that the Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro would feature Google Tensor, a new chip designed by Google that is custom-made for the two smartphones. Without revealing how, Google says that it helps make both the Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pri the “fastest smartest, and most secure Pixel phones yet.”

The video below was published as “unlisted” on YouTube on July 29 and was likely only posted specifically to the new Google Store page, as at the time of publication it had a scant 2,200 views.

The video also describes the timing as a “sneak peek,” so Google seems to be treating the launch of the product page as a precursor to an announcement rather than a full-blown reveal. While sneak peeks are nice, it is sort of strange to see such a downplayed rollout in this case, especially considering how different the new smartphones look from not only Pixel’s past but any other device currently available. It is possible that the repeated, accurate leaks for the device may have taken some wind out of Google’s sails.

Those interested in being alerted to when the device will be available to order can sign up on the Google Store page for the device.

Source : Peta Pixel More   

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