Maintaining Good Nutrition for Your Child During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Note: The Pregistry website includes expert reports on more than 2000 medications, 300 diseases, and 150 common exposures during pregnancy and lactation. For the topic Coronavirus (COVID-19), go here. These expert reports are free of charge and can be saved and shared. __________________________________ As we begin to come out of hibernation, many of us are—for now at least—beginning to breathe a little easier about life during the pandemic. We have a sense of what we should and should not be doing to ease coronavirus transmission, and several things that were seemingly a concern, such as food safety, have been addressed to the point that The post Maintaining Good Nutrition for Your Child During the COVID-19 Pandemic appeared first on The Pulse.

Maintaining Good Nutrition for Your Child During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Note: The Pregistry website includes expert reports on more than 2000 medications, 300 diseases, and 150 common exposures during pregnancy and lactation. For the topic Coronavirus (COVID-19), go here. These expert reports are free of charge and can be saved and shared.

__________________________________

As we begin to come out of hibernation, many of us are—for now at least—beginning to breathe a little easier about life during the pandemic. We have a sense of what we should and should not be doing to ease coronavirus transmission, and several things that were seemingly a concern, such as food safety, have been addressed to the point that we’re comfortable leaving home again.

Life, however, is far from normal. And when you’re pregnant and/or have an infant or young child, the challenges of living differently seem to be multiplied. There are new ways of doing everything: doctor appointments, labor and delivery procedures, and enlisting caregivers (or even a friend to give you a break!) are just a few things that we’ve had to think more carefully about. Many of these issues have been addressed in the blogs you’ve read on these pages. This time we’ll ponder something that’s front and center in every parent’s mind: keeping your little one’s nutritional status solid.

The Problems

Naturally, providing food for all of use has been considered an essential service in these times. That doesn’t mean it’s a slam-dunk, however, to get whatever we want. First off, shortages still do happen, and not just in the paper products aisle. My local chain market has been fairly well stocked, but at one time or another, they’ve been low on meat, eggs, pasta, and (recently) flour.

Even as all those staples return, other challenges abound. Families newly out of work may have budgetary concerns when they shop. Some may be concerned about taking an infant or small child to a market, particularly since masks are not recommended in those age groups (under 2 years of age). School and day-care lunches aren’t as automatic as they were in the past, and some farmer’s markets are closed. Finally, with everyone working and schooling at home, meal planning and preparation may be more difficult.

…and, the Good Things

As we’ve seen, COVID-19 has presented many challenges as far as kid nutrition goes. But there are several advantages as well. Whether you’re working or not, breastfeeding may be easier to accomplish at home. If you have an older infant, it may be easier to make your own food for her; that way, you know exactly what’s in it and may even save a little money while you’re at it.

If your child is older still, think of the possibilities. It’s a great time to put into practice regular mealtimes, where family members sit down together. Kids who are old enough can help with the cooking and might even be interested in a small garden to grow a couple of edibles! You can turn your time at home into a “teachable moment” where food and nutrition are concerned.

What You Can Do

However you are affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a lot that you can do where good infant and child nutrition is concerned:

  • Plan for an extra meal when you shop, in case one or more ingredients for your meals aren’t available. Also, realize that one section—in my experience, anyway—that doesn’t seem to have any holes: the produce section! Take this opportunity to learn and appreciate the variety of good-for-you stuff that’s there.
  • Cook and freeze. That could mean less trips to the store, and you’ll save money to boot.
  • If the crisis is causing financial challenges and you are pregnant or have an infant or young child, see if you qualify for the Women, Infants and Children (WIC) program, which provides free or low-cost food.
  • Check the resources at your young one’s daycare or school. If they’re not running, they may still be providing nutritious meals. If they are in session, make sure they have policies in place to control the spread of infection.
  • Although it’s unlikely that COVID-19 is transmitted through food, now’s a great time to reinforce good handwashing as well as proper washing of anything used to prepare meals. Don’t forget surfaces like countertops and tables! It’s also a good time to warn against sharing food and utensils directly: what’s on the plate when served belongs to that eater.

At this writing, we can only guess what direction the COVID-19 crisis will take. We do know, however, that good nutrition is a building block for good health. Most of us are still holed up a little more than we used to be. Make the most of that time by instilling good habits in our hibernating youngest. If they learn to eat well now, those lessons will pay off when we’re again out and about!

The post Maintaining Good Nutrition for Your Child During the COVID-19 Pandemic appeared first on The Pulse.

Source : Pregistry More   

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20+ Anti-Racism Activities for Kids

20 anti-racism activities for toddlers, preschoolers and kindergartners that you can do at home to help start the conversation of race and racism. The post 20+ Anti-Racism Activities for Kids appeared first on HAPPY TODDLER PLAYTIME.

20+ Anti-Racism Activities for Kids

INSIDE: You will find 20 anti-racism activities for kids that you can do at home to help start the conversation of race and racism.

Talking to your young child about race and racism is hard but it’s important. Why? It’s important so that future generations of children can grow up in a world free of racial bias and anti-black racism.

Now I am not an expert of racial injustice but I am an expert on fun and easy learning activities for kids. So I went through Pinterest and asked many of my kids’ activity blogger colleagues to send me their best all-about-me activities.

The result is this list of creative and easy to do activities that can be used to help you start the conversation about race and racism. It is through conversations like these that we can all start to truly raise anti-racist kids.

When to start talking about race

The short answer is now. You can start the conversation about race as young as 2 or 3 years old. Studies have shown that babies as young as 6 months can observe race-based differences and children as young as 2 years old can internalize racial bias according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. This is why it is important to read books at an early age (6 months) with racially diverse characters doing a variety of activities.

With preschool aged children a great way to start the discussion on race in a positive manner is through books, TV shows as well as the activities set out below.

What to say about race and racism

The conversation about race need not be complicated with young children. You can start by talking about what melanin is and skin is (largest organ in our body) and highlight that the essential differences between different skin colours are the same as different coloured eyes.

Additional, you can talk about how amazing it is that our world has so many colours in it and just like a rainbow each colour’s beauty can and should be appreciated and admired.

Don’t make talking about race a one time thing

Activities, conversations and books aren’t the only ways to create an anti-racist home. Ultimately it’s our actions that will speak the loudest. We all know our children learn most by seeing as well as doing. We need to model the anti-racist values, behaviours and attitudes we want our children to uphold.

How to use these activities

Most of these activities aren’t specifically designed to teach anti-racism. For them to be effective you can use them as a tool to help get the conversation about race and racism with your little one started. Here are some things you can do before, during or after the activities:

  1. Read a book with a Black or Brown lead character.
  2. Talk about the physical differences and similarity between the characters and your child in a positive manner. Talk about thing like skin, hair and eye colour. Also talk about
  3. If the activity is to create a self portrait, have your child create a portrait of themselves as well as one of the characters in the book or TV show that has a different skin colour as them.

Anti-racism activities for kids

  1. All About Me Self-Portrait Collage (Fantastic Fun & Learning)
  2. The Colors of Me Art Activity (Teaching With Haley)
  3. Skin Tone Sensory Play – Mama’s Happy Hive
  4. My Body Colour Sorting (Mrs. Plemons’ Kindergarten)
  5. Diversity Craft (Fun with Mama)
  6. Mix and Match Puzzles – Free Printable (Kids Activity Blog)
  7. Family values printable for kids #BlackLivesMatter (Kiddie Charts)
  8. All About Me Sensory Self-Portrait (Fantastic Fun & Learning)
  9. Crazy Faces Loose Parts Play (Pickle Bums) – Try and cut out facial parts from people with different races and mix and match!
  10. Diversity Art Project (Teaching Special Thinkers)
  11. Multicultural Children Art (Free Printable) (Hello Wonderful)
  12. Multicultural faces printables play dough play mats (Nurture Store)
  13. Celebrating Differences with Self Portraits (Classroom Freebies)
  14. Cheerios Self Portraits (The Chaos and The Clutter) – A fun way to create a self portrait and a portrait of someone of another race.
  15. Exploring Hair (Carrots Are Orange)
  16. M&M Experiment (Crayons Freckles)
  17. School Uniforms Around the World: Printable Dress-Up Paper Dolls (Adventure in a Box)
  18. People Play Dough Mats – Free Printable (Pickle Bums) – These play dough mats are of an entire person.
  19. Rainbow Wooden People (Mama.Papa.Bubba)

A post shared by Jen | Mama.Papa.Bubba. (@mamapapabubba) on

20. Colors of Us Craft (Polished Play House)

. . . . . . . . . #polishedplayhouse #kidsbookstagram #amplifyblackvoices #amplifymelanatedvoices #bookstagram #blackbookstagram #earlyyears #earlylearning #bookbasedplay #montessoriathome #montessoritoddler #blackmontessorian #montessori #blackmontessorifamily #learnathome #toddleractivities #weneeddiversebooks #blackbooksmatter #homeschoolpreschool #blackhomeschoolers

A post shared by Nicole | Polished Playhouse (@polishedplayhouse) on

21. Matching Hearts (Happily Ever Mom)

A post shared by Katie ~ Happily Ever Mom (@happilyevermom) on

Want to learn more ways to create an anti-racist home?

Check out these great resources for more ways to talk to kids about race and racism.

  • Talking to kids about race – National Geographic
  • Your Age-by-Age Guide to Talking About Race – Parents
  • How White Parents Can Talk To Their Kids About Race – NPR

Want to diversify your instagram feed?

Check out these 20+ Black Moms to follow on instagram who share kids’ activities and 20+ Black Parents to follow on Instagram who instill a love a reading in their children.

Have an activity you think should be on this list? Drop me a message in the comments leaving your name and a link to the activity on Instagram, Facebook or in your blog.

The post 20+ Anti-Racism Activities for Kids appeared first on HAPPY TODDLER PLAYTIME.

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