Mark Crossley: The dark arts behind saving a Le Tissier pen

The only goalkeeper to … The post Mark Crossley: The dark arts behind saving a Le Tissier pen appeared first on Football365.

Mark Crossley: The dark arts behind saving a Le Tissier pen

Of course penalty-kicks were invented by a gambler. In 1890, Irish millionaire William McCrum first proposed penalties as a way of stopping the rough-and-ready methods of cynical defenders, who were partial to knee a striker in the stomach if ever they threatened to score.

McCrum, the man who later had to sell off the cotton mill from which he earned his own fortune to pay off debts wracked up on the tables of Monte Carlo, had given birth to football’s answer to Russian roulette. Get it right, you’re a hero. Get it wrong, you’re fucked. Proper fucked.

Think back to the most significant penalties you can remember and you almost always visualise the taker, and the agony or ecstasy that followed.

But what about the person stood all alone 12 yards away, facing not only the other 21 players on the pitch but also the thousands of fans filling three quarters of the stadium?

In episode three of the second series of , the award-winning Spotify Originals podcast produced by MUNDIAL, we’re given a brilliant insight into how goalkeepers think and feel when they find themselves staring down the barrel of a shot from 12 yards.

Stories From 12 Yards looks at three tales of penalty history, as told by the people that were there. The second of the three stories deals with the psychology and skill involved in saving a penalty, courtesy of Mark Crossley, the former Nottingham Forest goalkeeper who astonishingly kept out over 50% of penalties he ever faced.

The post Mark Crossley: The dark arts behind saving a Le Tissier pen appeared first on Football365.

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