McClure Meissner breezes to top of U.S. Amateur stroke-play leaderboard

Texas is known for producing great wind players, and two of the three leaders after the first round of stroke-play qualifying for the 120th (...)

McClure Meissner breezes to top of U.S. Amateur stroke-play leaderboard

Texas is known for producing great wind players, and two of the three leaders after the first round of stroke-play qualifying for the 120th U.S. Amateur at breezy Bandon Dunes Golf Resort in Oregon are from the Lone Star State.

McClure Meissner of San Antonio finished with a flurry of birdies on Nos. 14, 16, 17 and 18 to post an 8-under 64 Monday at Bandon Dunes to lead the 36-hole stroke-play qualifying. Travis McInroe of McKinney, Texas, shot 65 on Bandon Dunes and was in third place at 7 under. The Baylor junior birdied every other hole on the front nine.

Aman Gupta of Concord, N.C., also opened with a 64 and was 7 under on Bandon Trails, the second course used in qualifying. He did all his damage on the front nine, posting seven birdies and making the turn in 29. He parred all nine holes on the back, and the USGA reported his 64 broke the competitive record on Trails – formerly held by Chris Williams and Kevin Lim – by two shots.

Both Meissner and Gupta took advantage of their early tee times before afternoon gusts made scoring more difficult.

Gupta, who plays at Oklahoma State, was added to the field after Florida’s Ricky Castillo, who would have been the highest-ranked player in the U.S. Amateur, withdrew, telling GolfChannel.com that he has experienced extreme fatigue leading up to the week. According to the report, Castillo tested negative for COVID-19 twice but wanted to protect the field just in case.

Meissner plays at SMU in Dallas. He won the Southern Amateur in July for the biggest win of his career to date.

Defending champ Andy Ogletree shot a 3-over 74 on Bandon Trails and was T-101 after one day.


Sights and sounds of Day 1 | Leaderboard


The U.S. Amateur features 18 more holes of stroke play Tuesday. The 264-player field will then be cut down to the low 64 (there will be a playoff if needed to determine the final spots among the 64), setting up the match-play portion of the championship.

Match Play will be exclusively on Bandon Dunes on Wednesday through Sunday.

How to watch

Wednesday Aug. 5 (Round of 64 matches): 6-7 p.m., Peacock (streaming); 7-9 p.m., Golf Channel

Thursday, Aug. 6 (Round of 16 matches): 6-7 p.m., Peacock; 7-9 p.m., Golf Channel

Friday, Aug. 7 (Quarterfinals matches): 6-7 p.m., Peacock; 7-9 p.m., Golf Channel

Saturday, Aug. 8 (Semifinal matches): 7-10 p.m., Golf Channel

Sunday, Aug. 9 (Championship match): 7-10 p.m., Golf Channel

Source : Golf Week More   

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Mizuno JPX 921 Hot Metal, Hot Metal Pro irons

Gear: Mizuno JPX 921 Hot Metal, Hot Metal Pro irons Price: $1,000 (4-GW)/$125 per club with Nippon N.S. (...)

Mizuno JPX 921 Hot Metal, Hot Metal Pro irons

Gear: Mizuno JPX 921 Hot Metal, Hot Metal Pro irons
Price: $1,000 (4-GW)/$125 per club with Nippon N.S. Pro 950 NEO steel or UST Mamiya Recoil ESX graphite shafts and Golf Pride MCC +4 grips
Specs: Cast 4140 Chromoly with a cup-face design and pocket cavity.
Available: Sept. 17

It is not uncommon for golfers on the PGA Tour to compliment their irons with a game-improvement club or a distance-oriented long iron at the top of their set. Those clubs tend to create more distance, a higher launch and a quicker stop on the greens. For example, Paul Casey has played a Mizuno Hot Metal Pro 3-iron for more than a year because the club is easier to hit from long range than his Mizuno MP-5 muscleback blades.

Many amateurs need that kind of distance and height gains not only in their long and mid-irons but throughout the set, and for years they were offered oversized clubs that produced those attributes but that often were not the best looking clubs.

Now, recreational golfers who are turned off by oversized clubs but who want more distance and forgiveness can benefit from more normal sized, perimeter-weighted clubs that have flexible faces. Mizuno has two new offerings – the JPX 921 Hot Metal and JPX 921 Hot Metal Pro – made to do that.

Mizuno JPX 921 Hot Metal irons

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Mizuno JPX 921 Hot Metal irons (Mizuno)

Instead of being forged from soft carbon steel, the Hot Metal irons are cast from 4140 Chromoly, a much harder material. Its strength allowed Mizuno designers to make the faces of the Hot Metal irons very thin. The center of the hitting area is thinner than the previous Hot Metal and Hot Metal Pro, and that ultra-thin area is larger than in the predecessors. With a large pocket cavity behind the hitting area, it also flexes more efficiently for increased ball speed.

To broaden the sweet spot, Mizuno gave the Hot Metal irons a cup-face design, with the edges of the face behind the seams of the leading edge, the toe and the topline. When the ball hits the face, the leading edge acts as a hinge and activates a larger area.

Mizuno JPX 921 Hot Metal Pro irons

Mizuno JPX 921 Hot Metal Pro irons (Mizuno)

Finally, extra sound ribs were positioned around the frame’s perimeter to improve the impact sound and feel.

The only difference between the Hot Metal and the Hot Metal Pro is size. The Pro version shares the same materials and construction, but it has a shorter blade length, slightly thinner topline, less offset and slightly narrower sole.

Source : Golf Week More   

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