MCU: The Actors Who Almost Played Nick Fury Before Samuel L. Jackson

Before Samuel L. Jackson became the face of Nick Fury in the MCU, another seasoned actor was up for the role until he took his name out of contention.

MCU: The Actors Who Almost Played Nick Fury Before Samuel L. Jackson

Samuel L. Jackson's casting as Nick Fury made a lot of sense in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, but he wasn't the only big name considered. The founder of the Avengers has appeared in 11 installments to date, and there are various ways Nick Fury could return in the future. His initial appearance came in a cameo in the post-credits scene for the 2008 film that launched the franchise, . Here's who could've played Fury and why Jackson was deemed the perfect fit.

Fury was presented as one of the most enigmatic figures within the MCU, but more of his backstory was revealed through . Fury's military career started with the Army in the 1960s before he became a spy and the eventual Director of S.H.I.E.L.D. Other than starting the Avengers Initiative to protect the planet from otherworldly threats, Fury took part in fighting against the Chitauri, Hydra, and the Kree. Fury was based on the Marvel Comics character of the same who made his debut in 1963.

Related: Avengers: Actors Who Almost Played The Original 6 Heroes

Before Fury became a prominent member of the MCU and the driving force behind the Avengers team, the character was supposed to appear in Fantastic 4: Rise of the Silver Surfer. Due to rights issues, the role transformed into General Hager (Andre Braugher). Jackson already proved himself as a well-known movie star with roles in Jurassic Park, Pulp Fiction, the prequel trilogy, and many other films, but before Jackson was cast, George Clooney supposedly came close to acquiring the role until he took himself out of consideration.

Marvel Studios was said to be in talks with Clooney about playing Fury for their upcoming cinematic universe, and to get insight into the role, Clooney did some research when he came upon the comics series "Fury" by Garth Ennis. The six-issue series was extremely violent and gory, causing Clooney to question the role he was auditioning to play on the big screen, and the actor took issue with a particular scene in which Fury choked an enemy with the man's own intestines, according to research by Business Insider. In the end, Clooney decided he wasn't a fit for the role, so the studio went in another direction.

The character of Fury had always been white until Mark Millar's "Ultimate Marvel" comics portrayed him as a black man. In addition, they used Jackson's likeness without approval from the actor, but Jackson was fine with being the model behind the character and even reached out to Marvel about future acting opportunities. Coincidentally, those involved in forming the MCU already had their eye on Jackson after reading Millar's comics. Jackson then went on to sign a nine-picture deal which expanded into an even longer gig while perfectly embodying the look and attitude of Nick Fury.

Next: MCU’s Earth Can Never Be The Same Again After Avengers: Endgame

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Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker - Every New Deleted Scene From The Junior Novelization

The junior novelization of Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker includes a number of alternate and deleted scenes — like Rey's training being different.

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker - Every New Deleted Scene From The Junior Novelization

The junior novelization of Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker  includes a number of deleted scenes — ones presumably restored to  canon. The last film in the sequel trilogy, Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker seems to have undergone a number of cuts during editing. Naturally, that's meant there's been intense curiosity about deleted scenes.

In a breach with tradition, Lucasfilm chose not to include either deleted scenes or a director's commentary on , likely because they didn't want yet more discussion on what might have been. Still, both Rae Carson's novelization and the recently-released junior novelization are extended versions of the script. Amusingly enough, they actually present different visions of some scenes.

Related: Star Wars Theory: Obi-Wan Used Rise of Skywalker’s Force Heal In A New Hope

There are many scenes in which the junior novelization includes dialogue cut from the final film. The novel's opening scene is also particularly interesting — because it's distinct from the theatrical cut. There are several deleted and alternate scenes in the novelization; the following are the most significant differences.

The junior novelization of Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker opens with an extended training montage in which Rey practices against a number of training droids. It's a lot more dramatic than the scene that appears in the film, and it presents the dark side's influence on Rey rather more effectively than the movie itself. Rey is presented as far more driven and competitive, desperate to please her Master — Leia — by beating her old record. Unfortunately, her mounting frustration opens her up to the dark side, and as a result, Rey experiences a Force vision that is clearly orchestrated by Palpatine. Rey is shown as suffering from a form of survivor's guilt, blaming herself for the deaths of both Han Solo and Luke Skywalker, and Palpatine is playing upon that to manipulate her.

Like the film itself, the junior novelization of Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker spins away to Mustafar, where Kylo Ren is searching for Darth Vader's Wayfinder. Rae Carson's novelization already presents an expansion of that scene, in which Kylo Ren encountered a last servant of Darth Vader, a being known as the Oracle. Surprisingly, the junior novelization features a different version of that scene, and it's frankly far more effective than the theatrical cut. In this, the Oracle — otherwise known as the Eye of Webbish Bog — points Kylo Ren across the plains to the ruins of Vader's Tower, which was seen in . Among the rubble, Kylo Ren discovers an ark containing the lost Sith Wayfinder.

Related: Star Wars: Every Reveal About Palpatine In The Rise Of Skywalker Novel

As exciting as this scene may be, it causes something of a problem for the fanbase. After the Disney acquisition, Lucasfilm chose to take a different approach to the canon, making everything equal in terms of status — the films, the TV shows, the books, and the comics — but now the two novelizations contradict. What should be considered canon?

The junior novelization includes an interesting conversation between Leia and Maz Kanata that serves to set up the importance of Han's medal later on in the film. Maz has clearly become one of Leia's closest advisers, and it is Maz who persuades Leia to give Rey the lightsaber for her mission to Pasaana. It's difficult to say whether this particular footage existed; Lucasfilm was using old footage of Carrie Fisher from  and  to complete Leia's story. It's possible this was made, but was cut from Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker because it just didn't quite work.

More: Star Wars: Rise Of Skywalker Novel Suggests Disney Know They Got It Wrong

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