Melbourne protester in hospital with COVID-19

A person who was part of yesterday's protest in Melbourne's CBD has wound up in hospital with COVID-19.

Melbourne protester in hospital with COVID-19

A person who was part of yesterday's protest in Melbourne's CBD is now in hospital with COVID-19.

The Department of Health has confirmed that a person who attended the protests in Melbourne's CBD yesterday is being treated for the virus.

A department spokesperson said public health investigations were underway and has urged anyone who attended the protests and experienced a COVID-19 symptom should get tested immediately.

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"We are urging protestors to get tested should they experience COVID-like symptoms, no matter how mild."

The case of COVID-19 will be included in tomorrow's case numbers.

It comes after Victoria recorded its highest ever daily tally of COVID-19 cases today, with 766 new infections.

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Up to 1000 protesters took the streets of Melbourne's CBD yesterday after thousands gathered in the city to protest on Tuesday.

Victoria Police arrested 215 people during yesterday's arrest and made a further 92 arrests today, despite a far quieter and more relaxed day of demonstrations.

Today marked the fourth day of protests over a push to scrap mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations for the construction industry.

On Tuesday, Victoria Police Chief Commissioner Patton said the thousands of "selfish individuals" who protested had all placed themselves and others at risk of contracting COVID-19.

Premier Daniel Andrews also condemned protesters who breached the CHO stay-at-home directions.

"We have come too far to turn back now. Please spare a thought for our healthcare workers who are working such long hours looking after patients, many who are struggling to breathe," Mr Andrews said.

Victorian nurses have also issued stern words to the thousands who have protested in Melbourne's CBD, telling the protesters "to stop thinking only of themselves".

Source : 9 News More   

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World celebrates International Day of Sign Languages

Today is the International Day of Sign Languages, which marks a day to support and safeguard the linguistic and cultural identity of all deaf people and other sign language users.

World celebrates International Day of Sign Languages

Today is the International Day of Sign Languages, which marks a day to support and safeguard the linguistic and cultural identity of all deaf people and other sign language users.

This year's theme is 'We Sign for Human Rights', which aims to show how both deaf and hearing impaired people worldwide can unite to advocate for the recognition of the right to use sign languages in all areas.

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Data from the 2016 Census showed that 11,682 people used Auslan (Australian sign language), which has increased from 5306 in 2001.

For the first time, the question asking 'Does (person) use a language other than English at home?', included Auslan as a language prompt in the 2021 Census.

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Sign language interpreter Mike 'Mikey' Webb said there are still some stigmas that need to be overcome.

"My parents (were) being ignored. So if they were trying to communicate stuff they were always put in the too hard basket because people generally couldn't communicate with them," Mr Webb told 9news.com.au.

"To me if you give a deaf person access, I think the general community would be really surprised by what this community can offer."

The World Federation of the Deaf says there are more than 70 million deaf people in the world, with over 80 per cent living in developing countries.

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Mr Webb frequently does sign language interpretation for COVID-19 press conferences and says they can be quite fast-paced.

"You've definitely got to be on your game and when it comes to doing those conferences and stuff like that you need a really good understanding and knowledge of what's being talked about," he said.

Associate Professor of Linguistics at Monash University, Louisa Willoughby, said it is also important that deaf people from migrant and refugee communities are not overlooked.

"Where the challenge is is that a lot of deaf people from migrant backgrounds are people who've often just sort of stayed at home in the country they've come from," Associate Professor Willoughby said.

"They haven't necessarily learnt their country's sign language and they might communicate with something that we call a home sign system."

Associate Professor Willoughby said it can be very challenging for those people to learn Auslan.

She added that the International Day of Sign Languages was integral for recognising that "sign languages are real languages".

"They're very complex languages. They're a lot more than just gesture systems and that they are an incredibly valuable thing for deaf people to know," she said.

Source : 9 News More   

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