Morning Report: Colby Covington on Kamaru Usman: ‘He’s knocking out lightweights, he’s knocking out guys that shouldn’t be in there with him’

Esther Lin, MMA FightingNext month at UFC 268, Colby Covington will get his second crack at the undisputed welterweight championship when he challenges champion Kamaru Usman in their highly anticipated rematch. The two first fought at UFC 245, in a Fight of the Year contender that saw Usman win by fifth-round TKO. The bout was not without controversy though as Covington contended that many things conspired against him, including Usman faking a low blow and referee Marc Goddard stopping the bout prematurely. Now, Covington will finally get his chance to right those alleged wrongs, and to hear him tell it, half the battle was just getting back to a title shot. “It’s been such a journey,” Covington told ESPN. “It’s been tough. It wasn’t supposed to happen. They did not want it to happen. His manager, they were refusing. They were trying to find every way in the book out of fighting this rematch. They didn’t want this fight and the only reason they have to take it is the UFC gave them no choice. They said, ‘Hey, you fight this fight or we strip you. It’s one or the other. You’ve got to come out and prove you’re the best in the world. There needs to be no controversy surrounding this fight.’ So it’s been tough.” Since their first fight, Covington and Usman have been on very different paths. Covington has fought just once, securing a fifth-round TKO over former champion Tyron Woodley last year. Meanwhile, Usman has been extremely active, racking up three more title defenses, one over Gilbert Burns and two over Jorge Masvidal, and starting rumblings that he may be approaching Georges St-Pierre’s title of greatest welterweight of all-time. However, for Covington, those victories ring hollow given who he beat. “I had to go out and finish a former world champion in Woodley,” Covington said. “He got too easy paychecks against lightweights that should have never been there. His last fight was against ‘Street Judas’ Masvidal. God, I was beating that guy decades ago. That’s not an achievement. You’re proud for beating that guy? That guy’s a lightweight. He shouldn’t even be up here at the top of the mountain.... “He’s knocking out lightweights, he’s knocking out guys that shouldn’t be in there with him. These are easy paychecks and there’s a reason he fought those guys, because he knew he was going to win. A former training partner of his, Dilbert, the guy should have never been in there. ‘Street Judas’ Masvidal? The only reason he’s in that position is because he’s got all the hype on him. No one cares to see that guy fight. He’s not a top-tier fighter. ‘Street Judas’ Masvidal is the most fragile guy on the UFC roster and he deserves no place fighting in a championship fight and we found that out.” Though Covington’s comments may miss the mark in some respects, Usman did face criticism for choosing to rematch Jorge Masvidal in April despite having won a clear decision over him last year, particularly when other contenders like Covington were waiting in the wings. However, Usman was clear in stating that he was not being particularly interested in a Covington rematch since “Chaos” had only had the one fight since their first contest. In the end, it didn’t matter though and now Covington gets what he’s been after all along, a second shot at Usman. “The fact is no one wanted to fight me,” Covington said. “Go to Hunter Campbell, go to Dana White, ask them the truth. No one would fight me. ‘Street Judas’ Masvidal, they wanted to make this big hype fight, best friends turned rivals who hate each other’s guts now. He was running his mouth in the media saying all this and that, ‘I’ll drop Colby on sight, that guy’s fragile, blah blah blah.’ There’s no one more fragile than ‘Street Judas’ Masvidal. That guy got - is he even awake yet, or is he still sleeping from the last time he fought Usman? “I was trying to put on the biggest and best fights for the UFC. No one wanted to take the bait so now we are here and we get the best fight in the welterweight division and it’s gonna be a real treat for the fans.” UFC 268 takes place on Nov. 6 at Madison Square Garden in New York City, NY. TOP STORIES Notorious. Italian DJ Francesco Facchinetti accuses Conor McGregor of breaking his nose in an unprovoked attack. Gamebred. Jorge Masvidal explains booking of ‘coward’ Leon Edwards fight: ‘He does what I say, when I say’. Cleared. Ex-UFC champ Chuck Liddell will not be charged following arrest for domestic violence. Reaction. Michael Bisping reacts to Conor McGregor allegedly punching Italian DJ: ‘Conor’s got to get his sh*t together’. Smart. Dillon Danis breaks silence on Jersey Shore arrest, disputes videos: ‘I’m not stupid’. VIDEO STEW The MMA Hour. Contender Series highlights from last week. Free fights. Jan Blachowicz’s training camp. Corey Anderson on TMZ Sports. LISTEN UP Fighter vs. Writer. Matt Brown joins to discuss Aspen Ladd, Jon Jones, and Conor McGregor. The Co-Main Event. Discussing Conor McGregor, UFC Vegas 40, a

Morning Report: Colby Covington on Kamaru Usman: ‘He’s knocking out lightweights, he’s knocking out guys that shouldn’t be in there with him’
Esther Lin, MMA Fighting

Next month at UFC 268, Colby Covington will get his second crack at the undisputed welterweight championship when he challenges champion Kamaru Usman in their highly anticipated rematch. The two first fought at UFC 245, in a Fight of the Year contender that saw Usman win by fifth-round TKO. The bout was not without controversy though as Covington contended that many things conspired against him, including Usman faking a low blow and referee Marc Goddard stopping the bout prematurely. Now, Covington will finally get his chance to right those alleged wrongs, and to hear him tell it, half the battle was just getting back to a title shot.

“It’s been such a journey,” Covington told ESPN. “It’s been tough. It wasn’t supposed to happen. They did not want it to happen. His manager, they were refusing. They were trying to find every way in the book out of fighting this rematch. They didn’t want this fight and the only reason they have to take it is the UFC gave them no choice. They said, ‘Hey, you fight this fight or we strip you. It’s one or the other. You’ve got to come out and prove you’re the best in the world. There needs to be no controversy surrounding this fight.’ So it’s been tough.”

Since their first fight, Covington and Usman have been on very different paths. Covington has fought just once, securing a fifth-round TKO over former champion Tyron Woodley last year. Meanwhile, Usman has been extremely active, racking up three more title defenses, one over Gilbert Burns and two over Jorge Masvidal, and starting rumblings that he may be approaching Georges St-Pierre’s title of greatest welterweight of all-time. However, for Covington, those victories ring hollow given who he beat.

“I had to go out and finish a former world champion in Woodley,” Covington said. “He got too easy paychecks against lightweights that should have never been there. His last fight was against ‘Street Judas’ Masvidal. God, I was beating that guy decades ago. That’s not an achievement. You’re proud for beating that guy? That guy’s a lightweight. He shouldn’t even be up here at the top of the mountain....

“He’s knocking out lightweights, he’s knocking out guys that shouldn’t be in there with him. These are easy paychecks and there’s a reason he fought those guys, because he knew he was going to win. A former training partner of his, Dilbert, the guy should have never been in there. ‘Street Judas’ Masvidal? The only reason he’s in that position is because he’s got all the hype on him. No one cares to see that guy fight. He’s not a top-tier fighter. ‘Street Judas’ Masvidal is the most fragile guy on the UFC roster and he deserves no place fighting in a championship fight and we found that out.”

Though Covington’s comments may miss the mark in some respects, Usman did face criticism for choosing to rematch Jorge Masvidal in April despite having won a clear decision over him last year, particularly when other contenders like Covington were waiting in the wings. However, Usman was clear in stating that he was not being particularly interested in a Covington rematch since “Chaos” had only had the one fight since their first contest. In the end, it didn’t matter though and now Covington gets what he’s been after all along, a second shot at Usman.

“The fact is no one wanted to fight me,” Covington said. “Go to Hunter Campbell, go to Dana White, ask them the truth. No one would fight me. ‘Street Judas’ Masvidal, they wanted to make this big hype fight, best friends turned rivals who hate each other’s guts now. He was running his mouth in the media saying all this and that, ‘I’ll drop Colby on sight, that guy’s fragile, blah blah blah.’ There’s no one more fragile than ‘Street Judas’ Masvidal. That guy got - is he even awake yet, or is he still sleeping from the last time he fought Usman?

“I was trying to put on the biggest and best fights for the UFC. No one wanted to take the bait so now we are here and we get the best fight in the welterweight division and it’s gonna be a real treat for the fans.”

UFC 268 takes place on Nov. 6 at Madison Square Garden in New York City, NY.


TOP STORIES

Notorious. Italian DJ Francesco Facchinetti accuses Conor McGregor of breaking his nose in an unprovoked attack.

Gamebred. Jorge Masvidal explains booking of ‘coward’ Leon Edwards fight: ‘He does what I say, when I say’.

Cleared. Ex-UFC champ Chuck Liddell will not be charged following arrest for domestic violence.

Reaction. Michael Bisping reacts to Conor McGregor allegedly punching Italian DJ: ‘Conor’s got to get his sh*t together’.

Smart. Dillon Danis breaks silence on Jersey Shore arrest, disputes videos: ‘I’m not stupid’.


VIDEO STEW

The MMA Hour.

Contender Series highlights from last week.

Free fights.

Jan Blachowicz’s training camp.

Corey Anderson on TMZ Sports.


LISTEN UP

Fighter vs. Writer. Matt Brown joins to discuss Aspen Ladd, Jon Jones, and Conor McGregor.

The Co-Main Event. Discussing Conor McGregor, UFC Vegas 40, and the Bellator grand prix.


SOCIAL MEDIA BOUILLABAISSE

Conor McGregor.

Thirsty.

Trying to “scoreboard” someone who knocked you out the last time you fought is an interesting tactic. Let’s see if it works out for him.

Statement from Ryan Bader.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Ryan Bader (@ryanbader)

Establishing dominance.

Literally no one likes Dillon Danis.

Perspective.

Don’t be like this guy.

Blond Brunson.


FIGHT ANNOUNCEMENTS

N/A.


FINAL THOUGHTS

Thanks for reading and see y’all tomorrow.


EXIT POLL


If you find something you’d like to see in the Morning Report, hit up on Twitter and let him know about it. Also follow MMAFighting on and like us on .

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Marvin Vettori explains his problem with Paul Felder’s commentary, plans to speak to him during fight week

Ahead of his return against Paulo Costa in the UFC Vegas 41 main event, Marvin Vettori ended up engaging in a war of words with retired UFC fighter Paul Felder while he was serving as color commentator during a recent event. Vettori lashed out over the way Felder was calling a fight between Dan Hooker and Nasrat Haqparast while calling him “the worst to ever do it,” which led to a spirited exchange between them on social media. Now as he prepares for his own fight on Saturday night, Vettori will have Felder calling the action cage side but he promises whatever simmering tension exists between them won’t bleed into his performance. “I’ll definitely put it behind [me] and I’ll be laser focused when I’m in the cage,” Vettori told MMA Fighting ahead of his fight. According to Vettori, his issue with Felder came down to what he perceived was biased commentary towards Hooker and against Haqparast when they clashed at UFC 266 in September. The Italian middleweight says he’s had similar problems with Felder calling his fights in the past as well but his initial challenge over Twitter had nothing to do with his personal experiences at the time. “I just don’t like, and again, I came out saying this because I saw it happening to a friend of mine [Nasrat Haqparast] and not actually to myself,” Vettori explained. “Saying that, it actually happened to myself multiple times and one of the times was actually my last fight [against Israel Adesanya]. “Paul Felder tried to be the smart kid in the comments when he replied to me. I didn’t really like that. It’s not that I didn’t like it, it’s just coming from him, it’s not like it really made sense but he tried to be funny. I addressed the thing that was important to me.” Whether it’s Felder or anybody else behind the microphone, Vettori can’t help but feel at times that the commentators working UFC broadcasts can be skewed one way or another during certain fights. Of course, Vettori isn’t alone in his criticism — there have been numerous examples of fighters taking aim at commentators for perceived biases over the years — and he just got fed up with it that night. “Sometimes I feel like commentators, they just try to bias the public and whoever watches the fight cause they have that power sometimes and it’s wrong,” Vettori said. “We put our heart and soul out there and even him being a fighter and even him talking to the fighters before they fight, he should know better. Sometimes, I don’t know what goes on but I just feel like him in particular, he’s a puppet. “I’ll see him and I’ll talk to him. I like to talk face-to-face. At the end of the day, we’re in a civilized society, kind of civilized. By saying that, it’s not that it’s going to bother me or nothing. I just couldn’t keep my mouth shut when I saw it happen to a friend.” As part of the typical pre-fight week schedule, Vettori will meet with the commentary team ahead of Saturday night to chat with them about his training camp and preparation for the upcoming battle against Costa. That means Vettori will be answering questions from Felder and he definitely plans on addressing his issues with the commentary once they actually have a chance to talk. Vettori doesn’t want to misconstrue his actions as confrontational but rather a way to hash out their differences in person rather than a war of words on social media. “I’ll talk to him for sure. Whenever I see him, I’ll talk to him for sure,” Vettori said. “I just expect for anybody that does their work to be able to do their job properly. That’s what I ask. That’s the only thing that I ask. If he does it properly, then there shouldn’t be any problem.”

Marvin Vettori explains his problem with Paul Felder’s commentary, plans to speak to him during fight week

Ahead of his return against Paulo Costa in the UFC Vegas 41 main event, Marvin Vettori ended up engaging in a war of words with retired UFC fighter Paul Felder while he was serving as color commentator during a recent event.

Vettori lashed out over the way Felder was calling a fight between Dan Hooker and Nasrat Haqparast while calling him “the worst to ever do it,” which led to a spirited exchange between them on social media.

Now as he prepares for his own fight on Saturday night, Vettori will have Felder calling the action cage side but he promises whatever simmering tension exists between them won’t bleed into his performance.

“I’ll definitely put it behind [me] and I’ll be laser focused when I’m in the cage,” Vettori told MMA Fighting ahead of his fight.

According to Vettori, his issue with Felder came down to what he perceived was biased commentary towards Hooker and against Haqparast when they clashed at UFC 266 in September.

The Italian middleweight says he’s had similar problems with Felder calling his fights in the past as well but his initial challenge over Twitter had nothing to do with his personal experiences at the time.

“I just don’t like, and again, I came out saying this because I saw it happening to a friend of mine [Nasrat Haqparast] and not actually to myself,” Vettori explained. “Saying that, it actually happened to myself multiple times and one of the times was actually my last fight [against Israel Adesanya].

“Paul Felder tried to be the smart kid in the comments when he replied to me. I didn’t really like that. It’s not that I didn’t like it, it’s just coming from him, it’s not like it really made sense but he tried to be funny. I addressed the thing that was important to me.”

Whether it’s Felder or anybody else behind the microphone, Vettori can’t help but feel at times that the commentators working UFC broadcasts can be skewed one way or another during certain fights.

Of course, Vettori isn’t alone in his criticism — there have been numerous examples of fighters taking aim at commentators for perceived biases over the years — and he just got fed up with it that night.

“Sometimes I feel like commentators, they just try to bias the public and whoever watches the fight cause they have that power sometimes and it’s wrong,” Vettori said. “We put our heart and soul out there and even him being a fighter and even him talking to the fighters before they fight, he should know better. Sometimes, I don’t know what goes on but I just feel like him in particular, he’s a puppet.

“I’ll see him and I’ll talk to him. I like to talk face-to-face. At the end of the day, we’re in a civilized society, kind of civilized. By saying that, it’s not that it’s going to bother me or nothing. I just couldn’t keep my mouth shut when I saw it happen to a friend.”

As part of the typical pre-fight week schedule, Vettori will meet with the commentary team ahead of Saturday night to chat with them about his training camp and preparation for the upcoming battle against Costa.

That means Vettori will be answering questions from Felder and he definitely plans on addressing his issues with the commentary once they actually have a chance to talk.

Vettori doesn’t want to misconstrue his actions as confrontational but rather a way to hash out their differences in person rather than a war of words on social media.

“I’ll talk to him for sure. Whenever I see him, I’ll talk to him for sure,” Vettori said. “I just expect for anybody that does their work to be able to do their job properly. That’s what I ask. That’s the only thing that I ask. If he does it properly, then there shouldn’t be any problem.”

Source : MMA Fighting More   

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