Name the Artemis Moonikin!Choose your player! As we gear up for our Artemis I mission to the Moon —...

Name the Artemis Moonikin!Choose your player! As we gear up for our Artemis I mission to the Moon — the mission that will prepare us to send the first woman and the first person of color to the lunar surface — we have an important task for you (yes, you!). Artemis I will be the first integrated test flight of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and the Orion crew capsule. Although there won’t be any humans aboard Orion, there will be a very important crewmember: the Moonikin! The Moonikin is a manikin, or anatomical human model, that will be used to gather data on the vibrations that human crewmembers will experience during future Artemis missions. But the Moonikin is currently missing something incredibly important — a name! There are eight names in the running, and each one reflects an important piece of NASA’s past or a reference to the Artemis program: 1. ACEACE stands for Artemis Crew Explorer. This is a very practical name, as the Moonikin will be a member of the first official “crew” aboard Artemis I. The Moonikin will occupy the commander’s seat inside Orion, be equipped with two radiation sensors, and wear a first-generation Orion Crew Survival System suit—a spacesuit astronauts will wear during launch, entry, and other dynamic phases of their missions. The Moonikin will also be accompanied by phantoms, which are manikins without arms or legs: Zohar from the Israel Space Agency and Helga from the German Aerospace Center. Zohar and Helga will be participating in an investigation called the Matroshka AstroRad Radiation Experiment, which will provide valuable data on radiation levels experienced during missions to the Moon. 2. CamposCampos is a reference to Arturo Campos, an electrical engineer at NASA who was instrumental to bringing the Apollo 13 crew safely back home. Apollo 13 was on its way to attempt the third Moon landing when an oxygen tank exploded and forced the mission to abort. With hundreds of thousands of miles left in the journey, mission control teams at Johnson Space Center were forced to quickly develop procedures to bring the astronauts back home while simultaneously conserving power, water, and heat. Apollo 13 is considered a “successful failure,” because of the experience gained in rescuing the crew. In addition to being a key player in these efforts, Campos also established and served as the first president of the League of United Latin American Citizens Council 660, which was composed of Mexican-American engineers at NASA. 3. DelosOn June 26, 2017, our Terra satellite captured this image of the thousands of islands scattered across the Aegean Sea. One notable group, the Cyclades, sits in the central region of the Aegean. They encircle the tiny, sacred island of Delos. According to Greek mythology, Delos was the island where the twin gods Apollo and Artemis were born. The name is a recognition of the lessons learned during the Apollo program. Dr. Abe Silverstein, former director of NASA’s Glenn Research Center, said that he chose the name “Apollo” for the NASA’s first Moon landing program because image of “Apollo riding his chariot across the Sun was appropriate to the grand scale of the proposed program.” Between 1969 and 1972, we successfully landed 12 humans on the lunar surface — providing us with invaluable information as the Artemis program gears up to send the first woman and the first person of color to the Moon. 4. DuhartDuhart is a reference to Dr. Irene Duhart Long, the first African American woman to serve in the Senior Executive Service at Kennedy Space Center. As chief medical officer at the Florida spaceport, she was the first woman and the first person of color to hold that position. Her NASA career spanned 31 years. Working in a male-dominated field, Long confronted — and overcame — many obstacles and challenges during her decorated career. She helped create the Spaceflight and Life Sciences Training Program at Kennedy, in partnership with Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, a program that encouraged more women and people of color to explore careers in science. 5. MontgomeryMontgomery is a reference to Julius Montgomery, the first African American ever hired at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to work as a technical professional. After earning a bachelor’s degree at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, Montgomery served in the U.S. Air Force, where he earned a first class radio-telescope operator’s license. Montgomery began his Cape Canaveral career in 1956 as a member of the “Range Rats,” technicians who repaired malfunctioning ballistic missiles. Montgomery was also the first African American to desegregate and graduate from Brevard Engineering College, now the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Florida. 6. RigelRigel is one of the 10 brightest stars in Earth’s sky and forms part of the familiar constellation Orion. The blue supergiant is about 860 light-years from Earth.The reference to Rigel is a nod toward the Orion spacecraft, wh

Name the Artemis Moonikin!Choose your player!  As we gear up for our Artemis I mission to the Moon —...

Name the Artemis Moonikin!

Choose your player!

As we gear up for our Artemis I mission to the Moon — the mission that will prepare us to send the first woman and the first person of color to the lunar surface — we have an important task for you (yes, you!). Artemis I will be the first integrated test flight of the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket and the Orion crew capsule. Although there won’t be any humans aboard Orion, there will be a very important crewmember: the Moonikin!

The Moonikin is a manikin, or anatomical human model, that will be used to gather data on the vibrations that human crewmembers will experience during future Artemis missions. But the Moonikin is currently missing something incredibly important — a name!

There are eight names in the running, and each one reflects an important piece of NASA’s past or a reference to the Artemis program:

1. ACE

ACE stands for Artemis Crew Explorer. This is a very practical name, as the Moonikin will be a member of the first official “crew” aboard Artemis I.

The Moonikin will occupy the commander’s seat inside Orion, be equipped with two radiation sensors, and wear a first-generation Orion Crew Survival System suit—a spacesuit astronauts will wear during launch, entry, and other dynamic phases of their missions. The Moonikin will also be accompanied by phantoms, which are manikins without arms or legs: Zohar from the Israel Space Agency and Helga from the German Aerospace Center. Zohar and Helga will be participating in an investigation called the Matroshka AstroRad Radiation Experiment, which will provide valuable data on radiation levels experienced during missions to the Moon.

2. Campos

Campos is a reference to Arturo Campos, an electrical engineer at NASA who was instrumental to bringing the Apollo 13 crew safely back home.

Apollo 13 was on its way to attempt the third Moon landing when an oxygen tank exploded and forced the mission to abort. With hundreds of thousands of miles left in the journey, mission control teams at Johnson Space Center were forced to quickly develop procedures to bring the astronauts back home while simultaneously conserving power, water, and heat. Apollo 13 is considered a “successful failure,” because of the experience gained in rescuing the crew. In addition to being a key player in these efforts, Campos also established and served as the first president of the League of United Latin American Citizens Council 660, which was composed of Mexican-American engineers at NASA.

3. Delos

On June 26, 2017, our Terra satellite captured this image of the thousands of islands scattered across the Aegean Sea. One notable group, the Cyclades, sits in the central region of the Aegean. They encircle the tiny, sacred island of Delos.

According to Greek mythology, Delos was the island where the twin gods Apollo and Artemis were born.

The name is a recognition of the lessons learned during the Apollo program. Dr. Abe Silverstein, former director of NASA’s Glenn Research Center, said that he chose the name “Apollo” for the NASA’s first Moon landing program because image of “Apollo riding his chariot across the Sun was appropriate to the grand scale of the proposed program.” Between 1969 and 1972, we successfully landed 12 humans on the lunar surface — providing us with invaluable information as the Artemis program gears up to send the first woman and the first person of color to the Moon.

4. Duhart

Duhart is a reference to Dr. Irene Duhart Long, the first African American woman to serve in the Senior Executive Service at Kennedy Space Center. As chief medical officer at the Florida spaceport, she was the first woman and the first person of color to hold that position. Her NASA career spanned 31 years.

Working in a male-dominated field, Long confronted — and overcame — many obstacles and challenges during her decorated career. She helped create the Spaceflight and Life Sciences Training Program at Kennedy, in partnership with Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, a program that encouraged more women and people of color to explore careers in science.

5. Montgomery

Montgomery is a reference to Julius Montgomery, the first African American ever hired at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to work as a technical professional. After earning a bachelor’s degree at Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, Montgomery served in the U.S. Air Force, where he earned a first class radio-telescope operator’s license. Montgomery began his Cape Canaveral career in 1956 as a member of the “Range Rats,” technicians who repaired malfunctioning ballistic missiles.

Montgomery was also the first African American to desegregate and graduate from Brevard Engineering College, now the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Florida.

6. Rigel

Rigel is one of the 10 brightest stars in Earth’s sky and forms part of the familiar constellation Orion. The blue supergiant is about 860 light-years from Earth.

The reference to Rigel is a nod toward the Orion spacecraft, which the Moonikin (and future Artemis astronauts!) will be riding aboard. Built to take humans farther than they’ve ever gone before, the Orion spacecraft will serve as the exploration vehicle that will carry crew into space and provide safe re-entry back to Earth.

7. Shackleton

Shackleton Crater is a crater on the Moon named after the Antarctic explorer, Ernest Shackleton. The interior of the crater receives almost no direct sunlight, which makes it very cold — the perfect place to find ice. Our Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft (LRO) returned data that ice may make up as much as 22% of the surface material in Shackleton!

Shackleton Crater is unique because even though most of it is permanently shadowed, three points on the rim remain collectively sunlit for more than 90% of the year. The crater is a prominent feature at the Moon’s South Pole, a region where NASA plans to send Artemis astronauts on future missions.

8. Wargo

Wargo is a reference to Michael Wargo, who represented NASA as the first Chief Exploration Scientist for the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters. He was a leading contributor to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS), which launched together on to the Moon and confirmed water existed there in 2009.

Throughout his time as an instructor at MIT and his 20-year career at NASA, Wargo was known as a science ambassador to the public, and for his ability to explain complex scientific challenges and discoveries to less technical audiences. Following his sudden death in 2013, the International Astronomical Union posthumously named a crater on the far side of the Moon in his honor.

Want to participate in the naming contest? Make sure you are following @NASAArtemis on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram to get notified about the bracket challenges between June 16 and June 28! Learn more about the Name the Artemis Moonikin Challenge here.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com.

Source : NASA More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

Northrop Grumman launches second classified US government mission in two days with NROL-111

Northrop Grumman launched three national security payloads for the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) on the… The post Northrop Grumman launches second classified US government mission in two days with NROL-111 appeared first on NASASpaceFlight.com.

Northrop Grumman launches second classified US government mission in two days with NROL-111

Northrop Grumman launched three national security payloads for the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) on the NROL-111 mission. The company used their solid propellant Minotaur I rocket to place the payloads into a low Earth orbit with a liftoff from Pad-0B at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport on Wallops Island, Virginia occurring on Tuesday, June 15 at 13:35 UTC (09:35 EDT).

Due to the classified nature of the launch, nothing is publicly known about the payloads. However, the mass must be less than 580 kg, which is the max payload capacity of the Minotaur I.

In keeping with NRO tradition, the mission patch consists of a whimsical piece of artwork, a mission motto, and some clues as to the nature of the flight. For NROL-111, the patch features a wild boar in aviator gear. The NRO chose the symbol of a boar because “boars are a good spirit guide to call on when you have ambitious goals, inspiring tenacity to achieve them,” noted the NRO overview.

Furthermore, the mission patch has three large stars in the background which represent the three payloads that are onboard.

The NROL-111 mission patch (Credit: NRO)

In the weeks prior to launch, Northrop Grumman conducted a number of checks and tests of the rocket, including final verification of the Ground Service Equipment (GSE), the four stages of the vehicle, the separation systems, payload fairing functionality, and payload health and readiness ahead of launch.

On launch day, the range was cleared and the director held a technical launch readiness poll. Following a 2 hour 35 minute weather delay, all teams gave their “GO” for launch.

At T0, the first stage’s M55A1 engine ignited, producing 891 kN of thrust to rapidly lift the approximately 36,000 kg vehicle off the pad.

A yellow-colored blanket — which provided thermal protection to the first and second stages while exposed on the launch pad — was attached to ground support equipment and the launch tower via guidelines. As Minotaur blasted away at a high thrust-to-weight ratio, the blanket peeled off.

The material is known as the “banana” since it peels away in sections and is yellow in color.

The high thrust-to-weight ratio — due to the former Intercontinental Ballistic Missile nature of the rocket system’s heritage — caused Minotaur to rapidly pitch over at T+2.5 seconds after a brief vertical ascent.

The first stage burned for 61 seconds before undergoing an instantaneous staging — where it separated from the second stage at the same moment the second stage itself ignited… again a holdover from the rocket’s history as a former ICBM.

The second stage skirt then separated during the stage’s approximately 72 second burn before burning out and separating from the vehicle. The third stage solid motor ignited 2.1 seconds later for a 74 second burn that brought the rocket’s apogee to the correct orbital height while leaving the perigee substantially suborbital.

A coast phase then ensued as the rocket moved up close to apogee. Just before reaching that point, the third stage will separate and the fourth stage’s solid rocket motor will ignite. The fourth stage uses closed loop guidance — where its guidance system uses a variety of data to precisely steer the rocket based on real-time inputs.

At the completion of the approximately 68 second burn of the fourth stage, the vehicle will be in its intended orbit with payload separation following.

Minotaur I

The Minotaur family of rockets have an extensive history in spaceflight, having first been developed by Orbital Sciences Corporation (now absorbed by Northrop Grumman) for the US Air Force’s Orbital/Suborbital Program as a low-cost Space Launch Vehicle.

The rocket utilizes a combination of proven orbital space launch technologies and government-supplied decommissioned ICBMs as a result of arms reduction treaties. 

A successor to the Minotaur-C (previously named Taurus) launch vehicle, Minotaur I consists of a Minuteman II-derived M55A1 first stage and an SR19 second stage. Manufactured by the now-defunct Thiokol (bought by ATK Launch Systems which then merged with Orbital Sciences to form Orbital ATK… which was then bought by Northrop Grumman), the first stage produces 891 kilonewtons while the Aerojet Rocketdyne-manufactured second stage has 268 kilonewtons of thrust. 

According to a GAO report in 2017, both of the motors cost around $4,277,510 — adjusted for inflation. This includes refurbishment, transportation and other mission related costs.

Powered by solid rocket propellant HTPB (Hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene), the third stage is an Orion 50XL while the fourth stage is an Orion 38.

The Orion 50XL is an extended-length version of the initial Orion 50 solid rocket motor, with an average thrust of 118 kilonewtons. It is 45 centimeters longer and contains 207 kilograms more propellant and has a vector-able nozzle. It is also used as the second stage in the air launched Pegasus XL rocket and first flew on the Space Test Experiment Platform (STEP-3) mission on June 22, 1995; however, the motor failed in-flight, leading to a loss of mission.

The Orion 38 was developed as a low-cost, high performance third stage for the Pegasus launch vehicle and also sports a vector-able nozzle. It has an average thrust of 32.7 kilonewtons, has performed successfully in more than 80 flights over two decades of use, and first flew on the debut flight of the Pegasus rocket on April 5, 1990, delivering the Department of Defense’s payload NavySat to orbit.

An additional, hydrazine-powered fifth stage — named HAPS (Hydrazine Auxiliary Propulsion System) — can also be integrated if greater precision is needed for orbital injection or to have the capability to maneuver to deploy multiple payloads.

The optional fifth stage is not being used for this launch.

(Lead photo: Minotaur I launches on NROL-111. Credit: Brady Kenniston for NSF/L2)

The post Northrop Grumman launches second classified US government mission in two days with NROL-111 appeared first on NASASpaceFlight.com.

Source : NASA More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.