NASA Sees Our Ocean in Color. How About You?Take a deep breath. Feel the oxygen in your lungs. We...

NASA Sees Our Ocean in Color. How About You?Take a deep breath. Feel the oxygen in your lungs. We have the ocean to thank for that! Over long time scales, between 50 and 70 percent of our planet’s oxygen is produced by microscopic organisms living in the ocean.Today is World Oceans Day! And as our planet’s climate continues to change, we want to understand how one of our biggest ecosystems is changing with it.Wondering how you can celebrate with NASA? We’ve got downloadable coloring pages and online coloring interactives to show how we study the ocean. Read on.From Space to SeaDownload ocean missions coloring page hereDownload Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich coloring page hereWe use planes, boats, Earth-observing satellites and much more to study the ocean and partner with organizations all over the world. Here are a few examples:From SeaThe Export Processes in the Ocean from Remote Sensing (EXPORTS) is oen way we study the ocean from the sea. study changes in the ocean’s carbon cycle. In May, scientists and crew conducted research on three ships in the Northern Atlantic Ocean. They hope to create models to better understand climate change patterns.From SpaceLaunched last year, the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich spacecraft began a five-and-a-half-year prime mission to collect the most accurate data yet on global sea level and how our oceans are rising in response to climate change. Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich is just one of many satellites monitoring the ocean from space. Together with other Earth-observing spacecraft, the mission will also collect precise data of atmospheric temperature and humidity to help improve weather forecasts and climate models.Finding EddiesDownload Eddies Coloring PageThe ocean is full of eddies – swirling water masses that look like hurricanes in the atmosphere. Eddies are often hot spots for biological activity that plays an important role in absorbing carbon. . We find eddies by looking for small changes in the height of the ocean surface, using multiple satellites continuously orbiting Earth. We also look at eddies up close, using ships and planes to study their role in the carbon cycle.Monitoring Aerosols and CloudsClouds coloring interactive hereAerosols coloring interactive hereTiny particles in the air called aerosols interact with clouds. These interactions are some of the most poorly understood components of Earth’s climate system. Clouds and aerosols can absorb, scatter or reflect incoming radiation – heat and light from the Sun – depending on their type, abundance and locations in the atmosphere. We’re building new instruments to better understand aerosols and contribute to air quality forecasts.The Ocean in Living ColorDownload PACE coloring page hereThe Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission will continue and greatly advance observations of global ocean color, biogeochemistry, and ecology, as well as Earth’s carbon cycle and atmospheric aerosols and clouds. It’s set to launch in late 2023 to early 2024. Want to learn more? Click here to see how PACE will collect data and here to see what PACE will see through our coloring interactives. (Make sure to check out the hidden surprises in both!)Exploring Ocean Worlds on Earth and BeyondDownload Clouds coloring page hereUsing our understanding of oceans on Earth, we also study oceans on other planets. Mars, for example, contains water frozen in the ice caps or trapped beneath the soil. But there’s even more water out there. Planets and moons in our solar system and beyond have giant oceans on their surface. Saturn’s moon Enceladus is thought to have a massive ocean under its frozen surface, which sometimes sprays into space through massive fissures in the ice.Learn more about ocean worlds here: nasa.gov/oceanworldsInterested in learning more about how NASA studies oceans? Follow @NASAClimate, @NASAOcean and @NASAEarth.You can also find all the coloring pages and interactives here.Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com.

NASA Sees Our Ocean in Color. How About You?Take a deep breath. Feel the oxygen in your lungs. We...

NASA Sees Our Ocean in Color. How About You?

Take a deep breath. Feel the oxygen in your lungs. We have the ocean to thank for that! Over long time scales, between 50 and 70 percent of our planet’s oxygen is produced by microscopic organisms living in the ocean.

Today is World Oceans Day! And as our planet’s climate continues to change, we want to understand how one of our biggest ecosystems is changing with it.

Wondering how you can celebrate with NASA? We’ve got downloadable coloring pages and online coloring interactives to show how we study the ocean. Read on.

From Space to Sea

Download ocean missions coloring page here
Download Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich coloring page here

We use planes, boats, Earth-observing satellites and much more to study the ocean and partner with organizations all over the world. Here are a few examples:

From Sea

The Export Processes in the Ocean from Remote Sensing (EXPORTS) is oen way we study the ocean from the sea. study changes in the ocean’s carbon cycle. In May, scientists and crew conducted research on three ships in the Northern Atlantic Ocean. They hope to create models to better understand climate change patterns.

From Space

Launched last year, the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich spacecraft began a five-and-a-half-year prime mission to collect the most accurate data yet on global sea level and how our oceans are rising in response to climate change. Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich is just one of many satellites monitoring the ocean from space. Together with other Earth-observing spacecraft, the mission will also collect precise data of atmospheric temperature and humidity to help improve weather forecasts and climate models.

Finding Eddies

Download Eddies Coloring Page
The ocean is full of eddies – swirling water masses that look like hurricanes in the atmosphere. Eddies are often hot spots for biological activity that plays an important role in absorbing carbon. . We find eddies by looking for small changes in the height of the ocean surface, using multiple satellites continuously orbiting Earth. We also look at eddies up close, using ships and planes to study their role in the carbon cycle.

Monitoring Aerosols and Clouds

Clouds coloring interactive here

Aerosols coloring interactive here

Tiny particles in the air called aerosols interact with clouds. These interactions are some of the most poorly understood components of Earth’s climate system. Clouds and aerosols can absorb, scatter or reflect incoming radiation – heat and light from the Sun – depending on their type, abundance and locations in the atmosphere. We’re building new instruments to better understand aerosols and contribute to air quality forecasts.

The Ocean in Living Color
Download PACE coloring page here

The Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission will continue and greatly advance observations of global ocean color, biogeochemistry, and ecology, as well as Earth’s carbon cycle and atmospheric aerosols and clouds. It’s set to launch in late 2023 to early 2024. Want to learn more? Click here to see how PACE will collect data and here to see what PACE will see through our coloring interactives. (Make sure to check out the hidden surprises in both!)

Exploring Ocean Worlds on Earth and Beyond

Download Clouds coloring page here

Using our understanding of oceans on Earth, we also study oceans on other planets. Mars, for example, contains water frozen in the ice caps or trapped beneath the soil. But there’s even more water out there. Planets and moons in our solar system and beyond have giant oceans on their surface. Saturn’s moon Enceladus is thought to have a massive ocean under its frozen surface, which sometimes sprays into space through massive fissures in the ice.

Learn more about ocean worlds here: nasa.gov/oceanworlds

Interested in learning more about how NASA studies oceans? Follow @NASAClimate, @NASAOcean and @NASAEarth.

You can also find all the coloring pages and interactives here.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com.

Source : NASA More   

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Relativity Space reveals fully reusable medium lift launch vehicle Terran R

Relativity Space, leveraging their 3D printing technology, has announced the next step towards supporting multiplanetary… The post Relativity Space reveals fully reusable medium lift launch vehicle Terran R appeared first on NASASpaceFlight.com.

Relativity Space reveals fully reusable medium lift launch vehicle Terran R

Relativity Space, leveraging their 3D printing technology, has announced the next step towards supporting multiplanetary spaceflight: a fully reusable, medium lift launch vehicle named Terran R.

The company’s second launch vehicle, succeeding the Terran 1 rocket to debut later this year, will have more payload capacity than the partially reusable SpaceX Falcon 9, and is only the second fully reusable commercial launch vehicle to be revealed publicly after SpaceX’s Starship.

The two stage Terran R rocket will be 216 feet (65.8 meters) tall and 16 feet (4.9 meters) in diameter. The second stage features aerodynamic surfaces which will enable recovery and reuse, in addition to a reusable 5 meter diameter payload fairing. Terran R will be capable of delivering over 20,000 kilograms to Low Earth Orbit in its reusable configuration, beating Falcon 9’s 15,600 kilograms with drone ship recovery.

Just like Terran 1, Relativity’s small lift vehicle offering 1,250 kilograms to Low Earth Orbit, the components for Terran R will be 3D printed. Relativity Space aims to reduce cost and improve reliability by designing 3D printed vehicles with a low part count.

Scale comparison of Relativity’s Terran 1 and Terran R launch vehicles – via Relativity Space

“Together with our first rocket Terran 1, our second product, Terran R, will continue to take advantage of Relativity’s disruptive approach to 3D printing – reduced part count, improved speed of innovation, flexibility, and reliability,” said Tim Ellis, CEO and co-founder of Relativity Space.

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  • What differentiates Terran R from its predecessor is reusability and size. Terran 1 is a fully expendable small lift launch vehicle, while Terran R with full reusability is firmly in the medium lift launch market. Compared to the partially reusable Falcon rocket family, Terran R will offer a payload capacity between that of Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy.

    Powering the first stage of Terran R will be seven Aeon R rocket engines, generating 302,000 lb (1,343 kN) of thrust each. The Aeon R engine is a scaled up, high pressure version of the gas generator cycle Aeon 1 engine to be used on Terran 1’s first stage.

    The upper stage of Terran R will utilize the same Aeon Vacuum engine as Terran 1’s second stage. A pathfinder Aeon Vacuum engine completed full duration testing earlier this year at Relativity’s engine testing facilities at the NASA Stennis Space Center in Mississippi.

    Like almost all components on the Terran launch vehicles, the Aeon engines are all 3D printed.

    Both Terran launch vehicles are fueled by liquid methane and liquid oxygen, alongside several next generation American commercial launch vehicles such as SpaceX‘s Starship, Blue Origin‘s New Glenn, and United Launch Alliance‘s Vulcan rockets.

    Terran R is scheduled to debut in 2024. The vehicle will utilize the same launch pad as Terran 1, debuting later this year: Launch Complex 16 at the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida.

    Relativity has continued to prepare the launch site for operations with the installation of propellant tanks and a flare stack, and a lightning protection system.

    Relativity Space also announced that its first customer launch contract for Terran R has been signed. “Over the last year, we found ourselves being asked by the market to accelerate development of our larger launch vehicle,” said Ellis. “So we knew it was time to double down on our existing plans and scale the Terran R program even faster and build production capabilities at scale sooner.”

    Terran R is intended to enable missions between Earth, the moon, and Mars. “Terran R will be well suited to serve customers’ evolving needs in the large satellite constellation industry,” said Zach Dunn, Senior Vice President of Engineering and Manufacturing at Relativity Space and former SpaceX engineer, “while also representing a significant leap towards achieving our mission of building humanity’s industrial base off of Earth.”

    Combining reusability and additive manufacturing is aligned with Relativity’s long term goal of enabling a permanent human presence on Mars. CEO Ellis said “Relativity was founded with the mission to 3D print entire rockets and build humanity’s industrial base on Mars. We were inspired to make this vision a reality, and believe there needs to be dozens to hundreds of companies working to build humanity’s multiplanetary future on Mars.”

    “Scalable, autonomous 3D printing is inevitably required to thrive on Mars, and Terran R is the second product step in a long-term journey Relativity is planning ahead.”

    The first step on that journey, Terran 1, is still on schedule to debut in 2021, with more than 85% of the first flight vehicle now 3D printed. Terran 1 has acquired launch contracts from the US Department of Defense, NASA, and commercial customers Iridium and Telesat.

    The same manufacturing architecture that produces Terran 1 hardware will be used to produce Terran R. This scaling will be supported by a $650 million Series E equity funding round from both new and existing Relativity Space investors.

    (Lead render via Relativity Space)

    The post Relativity Space reveals fully reusable medium lift launch vehicle Terran R appeared first on NASASpaceFlight.com.

    Source : NASA More   

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