New COVID-19 treatment showing early success in Sydney hospitals

Doctors are reporting early successes with sotrovimab on patients identified as at increased risk of developing severe illness.

New COVID-19 treatment showing early success in Sydney hospitals

A new treatment is showing promising results in preventing vulnerable Sydneysiders infected with COVID-19 from needing to be hospitalised or dying.

As the anticipated surge of coronavirus patients hits our hospitals, doctors are reporting early successes with sotrovimab on patients identified as at increased risk of developing severe illness.

The monoclonal antibody, which is given by intravenous infusion, has been offered to patients who meet criteria at major hospitals across Greater Sydney over the past three weeks.

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"This is the first drug for which there is really good evidence that it can actually keep people out of hospital in the first place," Dr David Andresen, a specialist in infectious diseases at St Vincent's Hospital, said.

"We started using it really as quickly as we can because obviously the hospital system is under quite a lot of stress at the moment so anything we can do to keep patients out of hospital and prevent them needing admission is obviously a good thing."

Sotrovimab works by using artificial monoclonal antibodies – based on natural ones human bodies make – to bind to the spike protein on the virus, stop it from entering cells and helping fight off already infected cells.

Clinical trials found those who had a single dose showed a 79 per cent reduction in the risk of hospitalisation or death.

Among criteria for NSW patients is that it's given within five days of symptoms appearing, they don't require oxygen supplementation and they have risk factors such as being older or having diabetes, kidney disease, heart failure or obesity.

Because patients who receive the drug are COVID-positive, there are strict rules around infection control when they are taken into hospital for the half hour transfusion.

Sotrovimab, which is the first monoclonal antibody treatment approved for COVID-19 in Australia, has been used for longer overseas but new data will be collected on its use during our current outbreak.

"The data from the overseas trials were really very promising, suggesting that you can reduce a patients risk of needing to go to hospital by about three-quarters," Dr Andresen said.

The Australian Government ordered 7700 doses for its National Medicines Stockpiles, with shipments arriving last month.

It's not cheap at more than US$2,000 a dose – but is provided free to patients under Australia's public health system.

Doctors expect it to be a recommended option for eight to 15 per cent of adults with COVID-19.

The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) gave provisional approval to sotrovimab, which is made by pharmaceutical company GSK.

"No patient who was treated with sotrovimab ended up on a ventilator or in ICU, compared to a placebo, where those outcomes were seen," Dr Krystal Evans from GSK told 9News.

Today Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt said Australia would quadruple its supplies, ordering another 22,300 doses.

Source : 9 News More   

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World celebrates International Day of Sign Languages

Today is the International Day of Sign Languages, which marks a day to support and safeguard the linguistic and cultural identity of all deaf people and other sign language users.

World celebrates International Day of Sign Languages

Today is the International Day of Sign Languages, which marks a day to support and safeguard the linguistic and cultural identity of all deaf people and other sign language users.

This year's theme is 'We Sign for Human Rights', which aims to show how both deaf and hearing impaired people worldwide can unite to advocate for the recognition of the right to use sign languages in all areas.

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Data from the 2016 Census showed that 11,682 people used Auslan (Australian sign language), which has increased from 5306 in 2001.

For the first time, the question asking 'Does (person) use a language other than English at home?', included Auslan as a language prompt in the 2021 Census.

https://twitter.com/UN/status/1440888906170392576?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfwhttps://twitter.com/yarratrams/status/1440905291340689411?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfwhttps://twitter.com/HawthornFC/status/1440958056993415168?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

Sign language interpreter Mike 'Mikey' Webb said there are still some stigmas that need to be overcome.

"My parents (were) being ignored. So if they were trying to communicate stuff they were always put in the too hard basket because people generally couldn't communicate with them," Mr Webb told 9news.com.au.

"To me if you give a deaf person access, I think the general community would be really surprised by what this community can offer."

The World Federation of the Deaf says there are more than 70 million deaf people in the world, with over 80 per cent living in developing countries.

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Mr Webb frequently does sign language interpretation for COVID-19 press conferences and says they can be quite fast-paced.

"You've definitely got to be on your game and when it comes to doing those conferences and stuff like that you need a really good understanding and knowledge of what's being talked about," he said.

Associate Professor of Linguistics at Monash University, Louisa Willoughby, said it is also important that deaf people from migrant and refugee communities are not overlooked.

"Where the challenge is is that a lot of deaf people from migrant backgrounds are people who've often just sort of stayed at home in the country they've come from," Associate Professor Willoughby said.

"They haven't necessarily learnt their country's sign language and they might communicate with something that we call a home sign system."

Associate Professor Willoughby said it can be very challenging for those people to learn Auslan.

She added that the International Day of Sign Languages was integral for recognising that "sign languages are real languages".

"They're very complex languages. They're a lot more than just gesture systems and that they are an incredibly valuable thing for deaf people to know," she said.

Source : 9 News More   

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