Nick Cordero, Standout Actor in Broadway Musicals, Dies of COVID-19 Complications at 41

Nick Cordero, the charming Tony-nominated actor known for his work in 'Bullets Over Broadway,' 'Waitress' and 'A Bronx Tale the Musical,' died on July 5 after a grueling battle with the coronavirus.

Nick Cordero, Standout Actor in Broadway Musicals, Dies of COVID-19 Complications at 41

Nick Cordero, the charming Tony-nominated actor known for his work in Bullets Over Broadway, Waitress and A Bronx Tale the Musical, died Sunday (July 5) after a grueling battle with the coronavirus, his wife announced. He was 41.

Since being diagnosed with what was thought to be pneumonia in late March, the Canadian actor spent weeks in intensive care at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, had his right leg amputated, lost more than 60 pounds and was hoping to receive a double-lung transplant.

Cordero had come to L.A. to star as Bourbon Room owner Dennis Dupree in an immersive adaptation of the long-running Broadway hit Rock of Ages in a new space on Hollywood Boulevard. He had played the role years ago in a national tour and on Broadway, and the new version of the musical opened in January.

Survivors include his wife, fitness instructor and former Broadway dancer Amanda Kloots, who chronicled his health struggles on social media, and their son, Elvis, born in June 2019. A GoFundMe page has been set up to help the family.

In 2014, Cordero received a Tony nomination and a Theatre World award for his tap-dancing turn as the ghostwriting crook Cheech in the musical adaptation of Woody Allen’s Bullets Over Broadway. (Chazz Palminteri had earned an Oscar nom for his performance as Cheech in the 1994 movie.)

In his review, THR’s David Rooney gave Cordero high marks, noting “an easygoing confidence in the Bobby Cannavale vein that’s refreshing amid so much strenuous mugging, and he leads his gangster cronies in a fun tap number to ‘Tain’t Nobody’s Biz-Ness If I Do.’ It also helps that Cheech is the most distinctive character — an unrepentant assassin who turns out to be the most natural artist of them all.”

In 2016, Cordero played Earl Hunterson, the deadbeat husband of Jessie Mueller’s Jenna, in the hit Waitress, then left after a few months to star as Sonny — another gangster character made famous by Palminteri — in A Bronx Tale the Musical, co-directed by Robert De Niro. Rooney wrote that Cordero “steals the show” and “perfectly balances charm and menace in his compelling performance.”

Born on Sept. 17, 1978, in Hamilton, Ontario, Cordero attended Ryerson University in Toronto for two years before quitting to sing in a rock band called Lovemethod. “My parents were trying to put two other kids through college, so they were like, ‘Great!'” he quipped in a 2014 interview.

He played Tony in a Toronto production of Tony n’ Tina’s Wedding and in 2009 attracted attention when he starred in the title role of the rock musical The Toxic Avenger, an off-Broadway take on the 1984 film.

Cordero landed the part of Dennis in a national tour of Rock of Ages, then bowed on Broadway in the ’80s-set musical when he joined the cast at the Helen Hayes Theatre in 2012.

In 2018, he starred as sadistic dentist Orin Scrivello in Little Shop of Horrors at the Kennedy Center in Washington.

On television, Cordero played Victor Lugo, who led a gang of car thieves, on three episodes of the CBS drama Blue Bloods, and his film résumé included Going in Style (2017), directed by Bullets Over Broadway co-star Zach Braff.

Cordero, his wife and son had been staying at Braff’s guest house in L.A. while they were house-shopping when he became ill. “He’s a very beloved man, one of the kindest people you’ll ever meet,” Braff in April.

This article originally appeared on The Hollywood Reporter.

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Government pledges money to virus beleaguered arts and music sector

Big news is that the government has changed its mind and has pledged money towards the virus beleaguered arts and music sector. The various campaigns from across the board and the many different organisations have seen a change of heart and a welcome and life saving funding... The post Government pledges money to virus beleaguered arts and music sector appeared first on Louder Than War.

Government pledges money to virus beleaguered arts and music sector

Big news is that the government has changed its mind and has pledged money towards the virus beleaguered  arts and music sector. The various campaigns from across the board and the many different organisations have seen a change of heart and a welcome and life saving funding…

 

The British government today (5 July) announced a rescue package worth £1.57 billion to help the UK’s arts and culture sector weather the impact of the coronavirus.

The measures – which follow Thursday’s #LetTheMusicPlay campaign that saw the UK music industry come together to call for immediate government assistance for the live music business – will see emergency grants and loans extended to a range of creative and heritage businesses, including live music and entertainment organisations.

The package, described by HM Treasury as the “biggest-ever one-off investment in UK culture”, includes:

  • A £1.15bn “support pot” for cultural organisations in England, delivered through a mix of grants (£880 million) and loans (£270 million)
  • £100m of targeted support for ‘national cultural institutions’ in England, such as galleries and museums, and the English Heritage Trust
  • £120m capital investment to restart construction on cultural infrastructure and construction projects in England which were paused due to Covid-19

The devolved administrations in Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales will also receive extra funding, of £33m, £97m and £59m, respectively.

The repayable finance will be issued on “generous terms tailored for cultural institutions” to ensure they are affordable, according to the Treasury.

“EVERYONE WHO LENT THEIR SUPPORT TO THE CAMPAIGN SHOULD BE EXTREMELY PROUD OF THE IMPACT THEY’RE ALREADY HAVING”

The government says decisions on funding awards will be made in consultation with “expert independent figures” in each sector, including bodies such as the British Film Institute, Arts Council England and the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

Announcing the package, culture secretary Oliver Dowden – to whom the #LetTheMusicPlay letter campaign was addressed – describes culture as the “soul of our nation”. “I said we would not let the arts down,” he says, “and this massive investment shows our level of commitment.”

Further details of the scheme will be available when it opens for applications in the coming weeks.

Live Nation’s Phil Bowdery, chair of the UK’s Concert Promoters’ Association, comments: “On Thursday the live music industry came together in an unprecedented way to ask the government for support, and so this announcement is both timely and warmly welcomed.

“We asked for three things, and today it looks like the first of those – a financial support package – has been granted. We’re looking forward to clarification that this package safeguards our whole ecosystem – from our artists and crews, to our festivals, venues and many professionals – and working closely with the government to deliver it.

“THIS FUND PROVIDES THE OPPORTUNITY TO STABILISE AND PROTECT OUR VIBRANT AND VITAL NETWORK OF VENUES”

“Everyone who lent their support to the campaign on Thursday should be extremely proud of the impact they’re already having. Now let’s move forward and #LetTheMusicPlay!”

In addition to announcing the new funds, the government release says Dowden and his colleagues are “finalising guidance for a phased return of the performing arts sectors”, to be published shortly. “The government is working with the sectors to get it back up and running as soon as it is safe to do so, and is being guided by medical experts,” it reads.

 

The post Government pledges money to virus beleaguered arts and music sector appeared first on Louder Than War.

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