Nikon Will Unveil the Z5 Next Week, Here’s What We Know So Far

It’s a big month for camera releases. Canon unveiled the EOS R5 and EOS R6, Leica released the M10-R, Blackmagic dropped the URSA Mini Pro 12K, and Sony is going to release the a7S III on July 28th. Now, Nikon is preparing to release a new camera of its own: the entry-level full-frame mirrorless Nikon […]

Nikon Will Unveil the Z5 Next Week, Here’s What We Know So Far

It’s a big month for camera releases. Canon unveiled the EOS R5 and EOS R6, Leica released the M10-R, Blackmagic dropped the URSA Mini Pro 12K, and Sony is going to release the a7S III on July 28th. Now, Nikon is preparing to release a new camera of its own: the entry-level full-frame mirrorless Nikon Z5.

According to the latest report from —and confirmed by the notoriously reliable Nokishita—the Japanese camera company has 4 products slated for release next week: the Nikon Z5, a 24-50mm f/4-6.3 kit lens that will go with that Z5, and two Z-Mount teleconverters. As a bonus, we also got a corroborated list of specs for the new camera.

With the rumored release less than a week away (July 21st), feel free to skip this one if you want to “preserve the mystery” of the launch. Otherwise, scroll down to see everything we know about the upcoming Nikon Z5 based on Nokishita’s latest leaks:

  • 24.3 MP full-frame CMOS sensor
  • 5-axis in-body image stabilization
  • Hybrid AF system with 273 focus points (same as the Z6)
  • Eye Detection AF for both humans and animals
  • 4.5fps continuous shooting speed
  • 4K video capability (no further details at this time)
  • ISO 100-51,200
  • 369K-dot EVF (possibly a typo from Nokishita… 3.7m-dot seems far more likely)
  • 1.1m-dot touchscreen LDC
  • Dust- and drip-proof design
  • Dual SD card slots

According to NR, there’s also the possibility of a “development announcement” for the rumored Nikon Z7s and Nikon Z6s mirrorless cameras, but this hasn’t been corroborated by any other sources so we wouldn’t hold out hope just yet. Other that this last point, all of the above is more-or-less confirmed given multiple sources repeating the same leaks.

We still haven’t gotten to see what the camera will actually look like, but with the official announcement expected on July 21st, we don’t have long to wait.

Source : Peta Pixel More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

Android 11 Will Ban Smartphones from ‘Altering Facial Appearance’ in Camera

Here’s an interesting tidbit from the world of smartphone photography. Google is proposing a significant change to the Camera API in Android 11 that will prevent smartphones from using face altering algorithms that change geometry, skin tone, or apply smoothing. The new rule was brought to light by XDA Developers Editor-in-Chief Mishaal Rahman, who posted […]

Android 11 Will Ban Smartphones from ‘Altering Facial Appearance’ in Camera

Here’s an interesting tidbit from the world of smartphone photography. Google is proposing a significant change to the Camera API in Android 11 that will prevent smartphones from using face altering algorithms that change geometry, skin tone, or apply smoothing.

The new rule was brought to light by XDA Developers Editor-in-Chief Mishaal Rahman, who posted the update on Twitter as an addendum to their recent review of the Vivo X50 Pro. Phones like the X50 Pro (and others) often still perform some level of skin smoothing and skin tone brightening automatically, even when you turn their default “beauty mode” OFF.

This change to the API would ensure that any edits to facial structure or smoothing would need to happen after the photo was taken:

The new rule would be added to Android’s Camera API Behavior requirements, which you can read here. As Rahman’s screenshot shows, this would be rule [C-0-12], and it reads, in full:

For any android.hardware.camera2.CameraDevice or android.hardware.CameraAPI, MUST ensure that the facial appearance is NOT altered including but not limited to altering facial geometry, facial skin tone, or facial skin smoothening.

We’ll be curious to see if this has any impacts on camera apps that alters facial structure on-the-fly by design. It seems to apply specifically to camera hardware, so apps like Instagram (Face Filters) and Snapchat (Lenses) are probably exempt, but we’ll have to wait and see.

points out, the restriction are probably meant to avoid controversial always-on beauty filters or nefarious AI-based deepfakes. But if and when this goes into effect, it’s likely to impact a whole slew of OEMs big and small.


Image credits: Header photo by Angela Compagnone, CC0

Source : Peta Pixel More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.