Nombu Kanji, veg nonbu kanji coconut milk

Nombu kanji recipe, veg version of Ramadan nombu kanji, a south Indian porridge with goodness of coconut milk, moong dal to heal your tummy. I once tasted veg nombu kanji in one of my uncle’s house. When I posted my oats Kanji I shared in it as well. Especially with fennel seeds in it, it... Read More The post Nombu Kanji, veg nonbu kanji coconut milk appeared first on Raks Kitchen.

Nombu Kanji, veg nonbu kanji coconut milk

Nombu kanji recipe, veg version of Ramadan nombu kanji, a south Indian porridge with goodness of coconut milk, moong dal to heal your tummy.

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I once tasted veg nombu kanji in one of my uncle’s house. When I posted my oats Kanji I shared in it as well. Especially with fennel seeds in it, it was very very flavorful,.

In other words, perfect balance of flavors and taste, that I could not even forget now. Similarly, I love poondu kanji or vendhaya kanji that we make often. But this style is very new to me.

Wanted to post for a long time, by saying so, I really mean it. As soon as I posted my oats kanji, I thought I should try Ramzan nombu kanji too and post it. But wanted a good authentic recipe.

I read few articles in news papers about the recipe. I realized, there are a handful of versions as well as it differs in each region, each place they make.

Few months back, that is last December, when the weather was cold, I was craving all of a sudden for this nombu kanji. Therefore I asked few people in my whatsapp, friends and relatives.

Once my relative shared this recipe and asked me to try. Worst of all, I lost the recipe, it was few years back actually. So I went back to her shamelessly and asked the recipe again. She is sweet enough to send it right away.

???? Video

Is video more your thing?

Before I made this, I tried another version also which almost tasted like porridge version of biryani and not at all same as I tasted in my childhood. After that, never had courage to try again and get an un expected result.

I know the one I tasted there had fennel seeds / soambu in it. I love the flavor it lends to kurma, biryani (south Indian way) and other few recipes. This kanji too.

Problem is Vj hates it like anything. For a person who isn’t demanding at all for the options, I did not want to disappoint him because I planned this for a breakfast as I prepare for the blog post.

Did not want to miss the fennel seeds flavor as well. So added in powdered form. I won’t say I could recreate the same I tasted, but was super delicious and flavorful. Definitely not a kanji form of biryani, no. So we both had it heartily.

???? Nombu kanji benefits

With coconut milk and moong dal in this porridge, it is really good to soothe a tummy that’s fasting for the whole day. Coconut milk helps in preventing or treating ulcer/ mouth ulcer.

So this comes as a rescue to those who are fasting. They use this kanji to break their fast.

Apart from this, the concept behind nombu kanji is, palli vaasal preparing it in bulk everyday. They serve it for free to all in the area who visits the mosque or pass by. Just like prasadam serving the purpose of feeding poor people apart from the sacred food offerings concept.

???? Variations

  • Swap coconut milk with grated coconut.
  • The rice we use can be varied. I used seeraga samba rice. You can use raw rice varieties like Sona masuri. I have seen in an article that they use broken rice.
  • The moong dal amount can be varied. I used 2 tbsp in my recipe actually. This makes the kanji thicker as it gets mashed and as it cools, it makes the kanji even more thicker, creamier.
  • Want to make it more nutritious? Use green gram dal (broken).
  • Use toor dal in place of moong dal.
  • Sprinkle little garam masala or biryani masala for extra flavor.

???? Coconut milk

I used around 1 & ½ cups of fresh grated coconut to extract coconut milk. First grind grated coconut with ½ cup luke warm water and squeeze the milk out. Keep a metal strainer over a bowl and squeeze the coconut milk. Repeat one more time to get coconut milk needed for the recipe.

You can also use store bought coconut milk, but I prefer fresh ones. It feels light as well as no preservatives, stabilizers.

???? You may also like

  • Ragi kanji
  • Vendhaya kanji
  • Varagu poondu Kanji

If you had tried this recipe, let me know your feedback in comments section.

warm serving of porridge
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Nombu kanji recipe

Nombu kanji recipe, veg version of Ramadan nombu kanji, a south Indian porridge with goodness of coconut milk, moong dal to heal our tummy.
Course Main Course
Cuisine Indian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings 4

Ingredients

  • ½ cup Raw rice or seeraga samba rice
  • 2 tbsp moong dal
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 1 Onion
  • 1 Tomato
  • ¼ cup carrot beans
  • 1 tbsp ginger garlic paste
  • 8 Mint leaves
  • 2 tbsp Coriander leaves chopped
  • ½ tsp Red chilli powder
  • 1 Green chilli
  • 1 & ½ cup water for cooking
  • 2 cups water later
  • Salt as needed
  • To temper
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 1 inch Cinnamon
  • 1 Cardamom

Instructions

  • Heat a pressure cooker with oil. Temper with cinnamon, cardamom.
  • Add onion and fry till onion turns soft.
  • Tip in the ginger garlic paste. In goes tomato, vegetables.
  • Saute for couple of minutes. Add 1 & ½ cups water, washed rice and dal.
  • Mix well and bring to boil. Pressure cook for 4 whistles in medium flame.
  • Once done, mash it well. Add 1 & ½ to 2 cups more water. Mix well.
  • Bring to boil and simmer the flame. Add the coconut milk.

Notes

  • Instead of coconut milk, you can use grated coconut. ½ cup to  1 cup fresh grated coconut.
  • You can increase moong dal more.

???? Step by step photos

1. Wash rice and dal, keep aside. Heat a pressure cooker with oil. Temper with cinnamon, cardamom.

washed, temper

2. Add onion and fry till onion turns soft.

3. Tip in the ginger garlic paste. In goes tomato, vegetables. Saute for couple of minutes.

4. Add 1 & ½ cups water, washed rice and dal. Mix well and bring to boil.

add water

5. Pressure cook for 4 whistles in medium flame.

cooked

6. Once done, mash it well. Add 1 & ½ to 2 cups more water. Mix well.

add water

7. Bring to boil and simmer the flame. Add the coconut milk. Stir well and simmer for a minute. Switch off the heat when it just starts to boil.

nombu kanji ready

Enjoy it warm the best. Since nombu kanji has coconut milk, please consume within 5-6 hours. You can refrigerate and consume if you know you can’t finish the same day. But refrigerate as soon as it is cooled.

ramadan-nombu-kanji

The post Nombu Kanji, veg nonbu kanji coconut milk appeared first on Raks Kitchen.

Source : Rak's Kitchen More   

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Pork Tenderloin with Creamy Mustard Sauce

Here’s one of those recipe gems that proves you can make something really incredible with very few ingredients! It’s a Pork Tenderloin with a Mustard Cream Sauce that looks and tastes like far more than the sum of its parts – just 3 ingredients, would you believe?! This is a sauce that’s truly excellent for... Get the Recipe The post Pork Tenderloin with Creamy Mustard Sauce appeared first on RecipeTin Eats.

Pork Tenderloin with Creamy Mustard Sauce

Here’s one of those recipe gems that proves you can make something really incredible with very few ingredients! It’s a Pork Tenderloin with a Mustard Cream Sauce that looks and tastes like far more than the sum of its parts – just 3 ingredients, would you believe?! This is a sauce that’s truly excellent for pork fillets. It’s elegant and indulgent enough for company, yet quick enough for family dinner tonight too!

Pork Tenderloin with Creamy Mustard Sauce

With a sauce made from just cream, mustard and a pinch of tarragon, this is one of those recipes where I actually had to restrain myself from adding more ingredients. I thought, “It just looks too simple.” A ridiculous statement, I know. But if it were me reading this recipe, I would be suspicious. “How can such a simple sauce be as good as this lady says?”, I would think.

Well, I can do no different from everyone else in the online world and just use lots of CAPS and EXCLAMATION MARKS and write, “This is the BEST pork tenderloin recipe ever!!!!!” to do my best to convince you.????

I can tell you that I did consider adding garlic and/or eschalots*. I thought about deglazing the skillet with white wine or masala. I pondered even boosting the sauce body with some stock.

But I realised it just doesn’t need it. This sauce is terrific as it is. It’s glorious. Sophisticated. Luxurious. >

And YES it really only calls for cream, mustard and a pinch of tarragon!

* That’s shallots to those of you in the US.

Spooning Creamy Mustard Sauce over Pork Tenderloin

Ingredients in Pork Tenderloin with Creamy Mustard Sauce

So with that, hopefully I’ve convinced you that this really is all you need:

Ingredients in Pork Tenderloin with Creamy Mustard Sauce
  • Pork tenderloin – Also called pork fillet, this is a lean and tender cut of meat. When cooked properly, it’s juicy and succulent. Tenderloins range in size from small ones around 300g (10oz) to very large ones weighing up to 700g (1.4lb). (Not in Australia, but I’ve seen ones this large overseas!) An average size is around 450 – 500g (16oz – 1 lb) each;

  • Oil – For searing. Any neutral-flavoured oil is fine here – vegetable, canola, or a mild olive oil;

  • Dijon and seeded mustard – Two different mustards here. They provide the flavour for the creamy sauce, including a welcome touch of tang. They also help thicken the sauce. Dijon is for the creaminess while seeded mustard brings textural pops of mustard flavour as well as a lovely look. I don’t recommend skipping the Dijon mustard, but if you don’t have seeded mustard that’s ok. Just add a bit of extra Dijon mustard to make up;

  • Cream – Full-fat for the best results. Low-fat cream works just fine, but won’t have the same rich and luxurious mouthfeel and flavour; and

  • Fresh herbs – A bit of tarragon adds lovely gentle aniseed notes to the sauce, while parsley brings a touch of freshness. I don’t recommend skipping the tarragon because it’s the “secret ingredient” here that adds intrigue to what would otherwise be a pretty pedestrian sauce. Parsley can be skipped on the other hand because it doesn’t contribute as much to the flavour.


How to make Pork Tenderloin with Creamy Mustard Sauce

It’s as simple as: Season → Sear → Bake → Make pan sauce!

How to make Pork Tenderloin with Creamy Mustard Sauce
  1. Season the pork all over with salt and pepper;

  2. Sear the pork in a large skillet, turning to colour all sides (I do 4 sides in total). It takes about 5 minutes to get a nice colour all over. If your tenderloin is too long for your skillet (which most will be) just curl it to fit. The tenderloin shrinks as it cooks, so I find by the time I’ve finished it fits nicely inside the skillet;

  3. Bake – Transfer to oven in the skillet and bake for 10 – 15 minutes, depending on the size of your pork tenderloin, or until the internal temperature is 65°C (149°F). This yields medium doneness, which will have the faintest blush of pink inside with beautifully juicy flesh. To cook fully with no pink at all, just take it to 68°C (155°F) – around 3 more minutes baking time;

  4. Rest – Rest the pork for 5 minutes before slicing and serving along with the sauce;

  5. Sauce – While the pork is resting, make the sauce. Return the skillet to the stove over medium heat. Add the cream and both mustards. Now mix, scraping the bottom of the pan to dissolve the tasty golden bits stuck to the bottom of the pan into the sauce (free flavour!); and

  6. Add herbs – Once the sauce is hot, add the salt, pepper, parsley and tarragon. There is no need to simmer this sauce, it’s ready as soon as it’s warmed up! The mustard acts as a thickener so there’s no need for reduction.

Creamy Mustard Sauce for pork tenderloin in a pan

How long it takes to cook pork tenderloin

As a guide, a 400g (14oz) pork fillet will take 10 – 11 minutes, and a 500g (1lb) pork fillet will take around 13 – 15 minutes to reach my recommended internal temperature of 65°C/149°F for medium doneness. “Medium” means a hint of pink inside with optimum juiciness. Cooking less than medium is not recommended for pork, for food safety reasons.

If you do not want any pink at all, just add 3 minutes to the baking time and target an internal temperature of 68°C/155°F.

These internal temperatures are what you should target when you take the pork out of the oven. It will rise by a further 3 – 5°C (5°F) as it rests. (This is called “carry-over cooking”.) Therefore the final internal temperatures are slightly higher.

I know it’s frustrating but I can’t give you an exact baking time. Such is the case with pork tenderloin as there are many variables. It depends on the size and width of the pork fillet (these darn pigs, why can’t they all just be exactly the same size??! ????). Also, heat retention of your skillet (a better skillet = faster cooking). It also depends on how long it took you to sear it and the accuracy of your oven.

So to ensure your pork tenderloin comes out perfect every time, I really recommend using an instant read thermometer. I have a Thermapen – more on this cool gadget here;

Do you really have to cook the pork fillet on the stove THEN the oven?

Yes, for the best results! Two reasons:

  1. Only stove = 90% overcooked pork – If you try to cook the pork fillet only on the stove, you’ll end up with a thick outer band of waaaaay overcooked pork before the centre of the pork is cooked through;

  2. Searing → Golden crust → Flavour, flavour, flavour! – Not just on the pork tenderloin but also crucially in the sauce. The golden bits stuck on the base of the pan after you sear the pork end up dissolving in the sauce. That “stuff” has a proper name: it’s called fond. These concentrated flavour deposits are culinary gold and are the same reason gravies made from roast drippings always taste amazing. Here it’s why we can make a sauce with just 3 ingredients taste so incredible!

    If you cook the pork tenderloin only in the oven and skip the pan sear, you will miss out on the golden crust and bits, and in turn flavour. ????

Close up of slices of Pork Tenderloin with Creamy Mustard Sauce

Pork Tenderloin with Creamy Mustard Sauce on a plate with a side of creamy mashed potato

What to serve with this pork fillet

The pork is pictured in this post with a kale salad which is actually this Kale & Quinoa Salad, minus the quinoa. Oh and minus the feta. And I used hazelnuts instead of almonds because I had them. ???? Alright, so it barely resembles the original recipe at all!! But I did use the raw kale marinating technique and the same lemon dressing.

I also used a Cauliflower Mash for a change-up from the usual Mashed Potato that I always reach for. I do think some kind of mash, rice or similar starchy side is essential here, to make the most of that Sauce. Especially because we don’t make loads of sauce, just enough for serving with the pork. So we really do want to capture every drop of it, and a bed of something that will soak up the sauce is ideal! – Nagi x


Choose your sides


Watch how to make it

Close up of Pork Tenderloin with Creamy Mustard Sauce
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Pork Tenderloin with Creamy Mustard Sauce

Recipe video above. This is one of those recipe gems that proves just few ingredients and minimal effort can still deliver a knock-out dish!
It's easy enough for a weeknight meal, but can step up as a dish elegant enough for company. A pinch of fresh tarragon adds a lovely sweet aniseed flavour, while mustard brings the oomph and thickens the sauce.
Note: The cook time is affected by the size of the pork fillet so a meat thermometer is highly recommended to ensure the pork is cooked perfectly.
Course Main
Cuisine Western
Keyword Baked pork tenderloin, pork fillet, Pork Tenderloin
Prep Time 8 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Resting time 5 minutes
Total Time 33 minutes
Servings 5
Calories 357cal
Author Nagi

Ingredients

  • 2 pork tenderloins , 500g / 1lb each (Note 1)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp pepper
  • 2 tbsp oil (vegetable, canola, or olive oil)

Sauce:

  • 1/2 cup cream , heavy / thickened (Note 2)
  • 1 tbsp Dijon mustard (Note 3)
  • 1 tbsp whole grain mustard (Note 3)
  • 2 tsp tarragon , finely chopped (Note 4)
  • 2 tsp parsley , finely chopped (Note 4)
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp pepper
  • 1 – 2 tbsp water , as needed

Instructions

  • Preheat oven: Preheat oven to 200°C / 390°F (180°C fan). Place a rack over a tray (for resting the cooked meat).
  • Season pork: Sprinkle the tenderloins all over with salt and pepper.
  • Sear pork: Heat oil in a large oven-proof skillet over medium-high heat. Sear pork all over until golden. This takes around 5 minutes (I sear 4 sides).
  • Bake (Note 5): Transfer the skillet with the pork in it to the oven. Bake for 12 – 15 minutes or until an instant read thermometer reads 65°C / 149°F. This will have a blush of pink, a perfect medium for optimum juiciness. (For no pink at all, add 3 minutes cooking and target an internal temperature of 68°C / 155°F.)
  • Rest: Remove pork from skillet and transfer to the resting rack for 5 minutes.
  • Creamy Mustard Sauce: Return same skillet to the stove over medium heat. Add cream and both mustards. Mix well, scraping the bottom of the pan to dissolve any golden bits stuck to the base of the pan into the sauce (free flavour!). Once it becomes hot but not simmering, stir in salt, pepper, tarragon and parsley. If the sauce seems too thick, thin with a little as needed. No need to simmer, the sauce is done!
  • Serve: Slice into 2 – 2.5cm (0.8 – 2") slices. Serve with Creamy Mustard Sauce!

Notes

1. Pork tenderloin (aka pork fillet) preparation – If you see a thin transparent membrane on the meat (known as silver skin), it is best to trim that off before cooking. Some butchers already trim it off. If you forget to, it’s not a big deal however. Trimming excess fat is optional.
Note: Tenderloin is not the same as pork loin. Tenderloin is tail-shaped: long, thin with a tapering end. Loin is much large and thicker, often with a fat cap and skin. For loin, try this Slow Cooker Honey Butter Pork Loin recipe.
2. Cream – If you must go low-fat, I won’t stop you! But the mouthfeel obviously won’t be the same, and the sauce will be a touch thinner. ????
3. Mustard – Dijon mustard is for thickening and flavour. Seeded mustard is for little pops of mustard taste and for the lovely dotted look in the sauce. Definitely do not skip the Dijon but if you don’t have seeded mustard, that’s ok. Just add another 1/2 tbsp of Dijon.
4. Herbs – A hint of tarragon adds a gentle, sweet and fresh aniseed flavour to this sauce that is just delicious so I really recommend using it if you can. Parsley can be skipped on the other hand without compromising the flavour of the sauce.
If you don’t have tarragon, try one of these combinations of fresh herbs:
  • 1/2 tsp thyme + 1½  tsp parsley
  • All parsley
  • 1/2 tsp chives + 1½ tsp parsley
Dried herbs won’t have quite the same effect, but if I was to use a dried herb I would opt for 1/4 tsp dried thyme.
5. Pork tenderloin cook times – And instant-read thermometer is highly recommended to target perfect internal temperatures. Tenderloin is a lean cut of meat prone to overcooking quickly. 
These are cook time guides for the recommended internal temperature of 65°C (149°F) which is medium (ie. a faint blush of pink and optimum juiciness):
Pork tenderloin weight:
  • 300g (10oz): 9 minutes
  • 400g (14oz): 10 – 11 minutes
  • 500g (1lb): 13 – 15 minutes
If you prefer no pink centre at all, increase the cook times by 3 minutes and target an internal temperature 68°C (155°F).
6. Nutrition per serving, including sauce, assuming 5 servings.

Nutrition

Calories: 357cal | Carbohydrates: 2g | Protein: 38g | Fat: 21g | Saturated Fat: 8g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 151mg | Sodium: 870mg | Potassium: 772mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 398IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 42mg | Iron: 2mg

Life of Dozer

When he’s caught somewhere he is NOT supposed to be!

(Also happy that there’s no sign of any of my Dirty Secret Foods in the photo of my pantry. Looks rather virtuous actually! ???? Lot of canned vegetables and legumes, Asian packets you can’t read, and I even spy a packet of quinoa!)

Dozer-in-pantry

The post Pork Tenderloin with Creamy Mustard Sauce appeared first on RecipeTin Eats.

Source : Recipe Tin Eats More   

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