Non-Profit That Gives Feminine Hygiene Products To Women In Need Struggles To Meet Increased Demand

Many non-profits are seeing a huge demand for their services as staggering amounts of people face unemployment. Dignity Matters, a non-profit that gives feminine hygiene products to women in need, is one of them.

Non-Profit That Gives Feminine Hygiene Products To Women In Need Struggles To Meet Increased Demand

FRAMINGHAM (CBS) — Many non-profits are seeing a huge demand for their services as staggering amounts of people face unemployment. Dignity Matters, a non-profit that helps women with an important products often forgotten about, is one of them.

“We collect, purchase and supply free feminine hygiene products to women and girls in need,” said Kate Sanetra-Butler, founder of Dignity Matters.

Normally, her non-profit would serve 4,000 women a month. But since the coronavirus outbreak started, she says the need has been much greater.

“Over the last one month, we committed to support an additional 3,000 women, so that’s about 80% increase,” Sanetra-Bulter said.

She said she thinks some of the increased demand comes from people who have never faced these issues.

“I think the longer this goes on, we are going to have families that maybe didn’t consider themselves vulnerable are now going to be in that situation of having to ask for help for the first time,” Sanetra-Butler said.

The shelves at Dignity Matters hold feminine hygiene products for women in need. (WBZ-TV)

The non-profit has struggled to keep up without the ability to do in person fundraising or tap into its normal group of 200 volunteers.

Sanetra-Butler said there have also been supply chain issues delaying manufacturing of her products.

“Manufacturers of feminine hygiene products are exactly the same as manufacturers of other products. So, toilet paper, paper towels, masks,” she said.

Thankfully, Dignity Matters pre-ordered enough product to help women at 130 different shelters and locations through April. But Sanetra-Butler said May could be a different story.

You can learn more about Dignity Matters at dignity-matters.org/

Source : CBS Boston More   

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‘Shortages Will Be Occurring’: Coronavirus Disrupting Meat Supply Chain

Some meat packing plants have been forced to shut down, straining the U.S. meat supply chain.

‘Shortages Will Be Occurring’: Coronavirus Disrupting Meat Supply Chain

WATERLOO, Iowa (CBS Local) — Amid the global coronavirus pandemic, some meat packing plants have been forced to shut down, straining the U.S. meat supply chain and raising concern over potential shortages.

“Meat shortages will be occurring two weeks from now in the retail outlets,” Dennis Smith, a senior account executive at Archer Financial Services, told Bloomberg. “There is simply no spot pork available. The big box stores will get their needs met, many others will not.”

Tyson Foods on Tuesday said it is closing the company’s largest pork plant, which has 2,800 employees and processes 19,500 hogs a day in Waterloo, Iowa. The shutdown followed an outbreak of at least 180 COVID-19 cases there.

“Despite our continued efforts to keep our people safe while fulfilling our critical role of feeding American families, the combination of worker absenteeism, COVID-19 cases, and community concerns has resulted in our decision to stop production,” said Steve Stouffer, group president of Tyson Fresh Meats.

The closure follows other major shutdowns at plants run by Smithfield Foods, JBS USA, and other companies that prop up the country’s meat supply.

Processing plants can be a breeding ground for the virus because many workers spend their day side-by-side.

“We are very close. We can’t use a social distance at that place,” said a man who recovered from COVID-19 who works at Smithfield Foods in South Dakota, where almost 900 employees have tested positive.

The disruptions are cascading through meat supply chains and causing “weird” dislocations for prices, Bloomberg reports. Finished products are surging, while farmers are getting paid much less for animals.

Source : CBS Boston More   

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