Norris: Ferrari's mistakes helping McLaren's cause

Lando Norris says Ferrari outperformed McLaren on pure pace at F1's recent venues, but the Scuderia's errors have... The post Norris: Ferrari's mistakes helping McLaren's cause appeared first on F1i.com.

Norris: Ferrari's mistakes helping McLaren's cause

Lando Norris says Ferrari outperformed McLaren on pure pace at F1's recent venues, but the Scuderia's errors have allowed the Woking-based outfit to remain in the wake of its rival in the championship.

Ferrari and McLaren head into this weekend's French Grand Prix separated by just two points in the Constructors' standings where the two teams stand respectively P3 and P4.

But the Italian outfit's points tally, and thus its advantage over McLaren, could have been more important without a few mistakes that impacted its results.

Poleman Charles Leclerc was denied an opportunity to race in Monaco following a drive-shaft failure on his SF21 on the way to the grid, while Carlos Sainz was forced to battle his way back into the points in Baku after an early off in the race.

"Quite simply in slow speed corners they are very competitive," said Norris. "They can often be one of the best cars in the very slow speed corners.

"A couple of the tracks lately have suited them. I’m hoping that we can be a little bit more competitive this weekend, but they are getting better.

"They are always making improvements, as are we, and we are trying to improve in every area.

"They’ve been very quick on Saturdays. Charles has been on pole twice. But then they have made more mistakes and struggled more on Sundays.

"That is where we have gained some of it back, and looked a bit stronger.

"So trying to continue that with the points being on Sunday and not Saturday, that is good for us and coming into our favour, but as a car they generally have been quick in qualifying on Saturdays."

  • Read also - Seidl: 'Strong operational momentum' key to triple-header challenge

Norris reckoned that his slightly more conservative approach on race day has improved his consistency, which is reflected in his results as the Briton remains the only driver on the grid to have finished among the top-ten at every event so far this season.

"It is good for me and us as a team, especially from where we are in the Constructors’," he said.

"We are very close with Ferrari, so these kinds of things add up at the end of the season.

"Even if it is one point or two points, it can still make a good difference, so it is good. I’m doing what I can.

"It depends, sometimes you want to take more risks and go for a better position. But also I feel like I have made good decisions to be on the safer side sometimes and not take too many risks.

"Like in Baku, I was down to 12th after lap one and things are not looking so good. But I still ended up fifth. It is good for me and us as a team. And that is what we need to continue."

Keep up to date with all the F1 news via and

The post Norris: Ferrari's mistakes helping McLaren's cause appeared first on F1i.com.

Source : F1 i More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

Pirelli's Isola: Red Bull and Aston Martin ran with lower pressures in Baku

Pirelli F1 boss Mario Isola insists Red Bull and Aston Martin ran with lower pressures in Baku that... The post Pirelli's Isola: Red Bull and Aston Martin ran with lower pressures in Baku appeared first on F1i.com.

Pirelli's Isola: Red Bull and Aston Martin ran with lower pressures in Baku

Pirelli F1 boss Mario Isola insists Red Bull and Aston Martin ran with lower pressures in Baku that contributed to their tyre failures, but neither team broke the rules.

Pirelli concluded in its official report that followed its investigation into the blowouts that occurred in the Azerbaijan Grand Prix that "running conditions" had contributed to the "circumferential break on the inner sidewall" of the rear-left tyre that led to the failures.

But the Italian manufacturer's report stopped short of clearly blaming Red Bull and Aston Martin for the incidents, but hinted that both teams had perhaps found a way to lower their tyre pressures below the prescribed minimum level while their cars were out on track.

The lower pressures, which allow for a greater contact patch for the tyre and therefore for a subsequent gain, led to "standing waves" being generated on the rear-left tyre's inside shoulder at high speed on Baku's long straights.

  • Read also: Pirelli reveals cause of tyre failures in Azerbaijan GP

"What happened in Baku is simply that the running conditions expected were different compared to the actual running conditions - and that created the failure," Isola told the media on Thursday in France.

"When you have a lot of energy going into the tyres, with the pressure that is lower compared to the expectation, the result is that on the sidewall you have what we call standing waves.

"Standing waves are putting a lot of energy into the inside shoulder of the tyre. And at a certain point, the tyre breaks. That is what happened, and the reason why we had this situation in in Baku."

But Isola admitted that Pirelli's theoretical car performance predictions for Baku, based in part on data supplied by the teams, proved somewhat different to the real performance.

"When we prepare the prescriptions [for minimum pressure], we receive the simulations and we consider margins," he explained.

"The expected loads, the downforce or the speed, are simulated, so it is not exactly the value that we find on track. And in this case in Baku, we also found some parameters that were not exactly what we found on track.”

"We assume that they are running at a certain pressure, and a certain camber. And with a margin on it, of course, we run in a condition that is okay for the tyre.

"In that case, we didn't achieve these conditions, not because teams were doing something against the regulations, but because they were looking as usual for performance, and that created a different scenario to what we were expecting.

"And the different scenario was that mainly the tyres were running at a lower pressure compared to expectation."

Both Red Bull and Aston Martin issued statements saying that they had adhered to Pirelli's prescriptions regarding minimum pressures, which the tyre supplier confirmed.

However, all teams rely on different sensors to monitor pressures and temperatures when a car is on track, and the information isn't therefore considered as probative or conclusive by Pirelli.

Next year, teams will all run a standard pressure sensor as part of F1's change to 18-inch wheels, which will allow Pirelli to monitor running pressures.

"If the regulation is not written that there is a [minimum] running pressure that you have to respect, I cannot say that they were doing something against the regulation in their search of more performance," continued Isola.

"If they respect the starting pressure, they are complying with the regulation. If the same happens next year when we, with the standard sensor, impose a running pressure, in that case they are against the regulations. But this is not the case this year."

Keep up to date with all the F1 news via and

The post Pirelli's Isola: Red Bull and Aston Martin ran with lower pressures in Baku appeared first on F1i.com.

Source : F1 i More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.