Obama slams White House's 'disastrous' coronavirus management

Former President Barack Obama has delivered a blistering critique of the Trump administration's response to the coronavirus crisis, describing it as "an absolute chaotic disaster" during a private call last night.

Obama slams White House's 'disastrous' coronavirus management

Former President Barack Obama has delivered a blistering critique of the Trump administration's response to the coronavirus crisis, describing it as "an absolute chaotic disaster" during a private call last night with people who worked for him in the White House and across his administration.

The searing comments, confirmed to CNN by three former Obama administration officials on the call, offered the starkest assessment yet from the former president about how President Donald Trump and his team have handled the deadly pandemic and why he believes Democrats must rally behind former Vice President Joe Biden to defeat Mr Trump in November.

In a 30-minute conversation with members of the Obama Alumni Association, the former president said the response to the coronavirus outbreak served as a critical reminder for why strong government leadership is needed during a global crisis.

The call was intended to encourage former Obama staffers to become more engaged in Biden's presidential campaign.

"This election that's coming up – on every level – is so important because what we're going to be battling is not just a particular individual or a political party," Obama said.

"What we're fighting against is these long-term trends in which being selfish, being tribal, being divided, and seeing others as an enemy – that has become a stronger impulse in American life."

The comments were first reported by Yahoo News, which obtained an audio recording of the call. A spokesman for Obama declined to comment or elaborate on the former president's remarks.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany today dismissed the criticism from Obama, saying in a statement to CNN: "President Trump's coronavirus response has been unprecedented and saved American lives".

The White House did not respond to Obama's comments on the Department of Justice's decision to drop charges against Michael Flynn.

Weighing in on the case during the call, Obama said Attorney General William Barr's decision to drop the criminal case against Flynn suggested "the rule of law was at risk" in the United States.

Before taking office, Obama warned Mr Trump about Flynn and raised questions about his conduct with Russia.

But Obama saved his strongest words for the Trump administration's handling of the coronavirus crisis and its worldview.

Coronavirus myths debunked

"It's part of the reason why the response to this global crisis has been so anaemic and spotty," Obama said.

"It would have been bad even with the best of governments.

"It has been an absolute chaotic disaster when that mindset – of 'what's in it for me' and 'to heck with everybody else' – when that mindset is operationalised in our government."

He added: "That's why, I, by the way, am going to be spending as much time as necessary and campaigning as hard as I can for Joe Biden".

After formally endorsing Mr Biden last month, Obama said he would be deeply involved in the campaign to help Mr Biden win the White House.

His remarks on Friday night were the latest example of that effort, telling the Obama Alumni group: "I am hoping that all of you feel the same sense of urgency that I do".

Coronavirus: what you need to know

How is coronavirus transmitted?

The human coronavirus is only spread from someone infected with COVID-19 to another. This occurs through close contact with an infected person through contaminated droplets spread by coughing or sneezing, or by contact with contaminated hands or surfaces.

How can I protect myself and my family?

World Health Organisation and NSW Health both recommend basic hygiene practices as the best way to protect yourself from coronavirus.

Good hygiene includes:

  • Clean your hands thoroughly for at least 20 seconds with soap and water, or an alcohol-based hand sanitiser;
  • Cover your nose and mouth when coughing and sneezing with tissue or your elbow;
  • Avoid close contact with anyone with cold or flu-like symptoms;
  • Apply safe food practices; and
  • Stay home if you are sick.

For breaking news alerts and livestreams straight to your smartphone sign up to the and set notifications to on at the or You can also get up-to-date information from the Federal Government's Coronavirus Australia app, available on the  and the .

Reported with CNN.

Source : 9 News More   

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More US children die from possible coronavirus-linked syndrome

Three children have died in New York state as a result of a possible coronavirus complication, while Italy has released more than 4000 people from its hospitals.

More US children die from possible coronavirus-linked syndrome

Three children have died in New York state as a result of a possible coronavirus complication, while Italy has released more than 4000 people from its hospitals.

USA

Three children have now died in New York state from a possible complication from the coronavirus involving swollen blood vessels and heart problems, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said today.

At least 73 children in New York have been diagnosed with symptoms similar to Kawasaki disease – a rare inflammatory condition in children – and toxic shock syndrome. There is no proof that the virus causes the mysterious syndrome.

The US federal government is meanwhile sending supplies of the first drug that appears to help speed the recovery of some COVID-19 patients to six states, where it will be distributed by health departments.

The US Department of Health and Human Services announced today that it is delivering 140 cases of the drug remdesivir to Illinois, 110 cases to New Jersey, 40 cases to Michigan, 30 cases each to Connecticut and Maryland and 10 cases to Iowa.

FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn, a member of the White House coronavirus task force, is also in self-quarantine for the next two weeks after coming in contact with a person who has tested positive for COVID-19.

Meanwhile, former President Barack Obama has delivered a blistering critique of the Trump administration's response to the coronavirus crisis.

In a rare critique of the Trump leadership, Obama describing it as "an absolute chaotic disaster" during a private call last night with people who worked for him in the White House and across his administration.

The searing comments, confirmed to CNN by three former Obama administration officials on the call, offered the starkest assessment yet from the former president about how President Donald Trump and his team have handled the deadly pandemic and why he believes Democrats must rally behind former Vice President Joe Biden to defeat Mr Trump in November.

Italy

Italy says a near-record 4008 people were released from hospitals in the past day after testing negative for COVID-19 as the country continues its cautious reopening after a two-month national lockdown.

Another 1083 people tested positive, half of them in hard-hit Lombardy, bringing Italy's confirmed number of cases to 218,268. Officials say the real number is as much as 10 times that.

Another 194 people died, one of the lowest day-to-day death tolls in recent weeks. The confirmed COVID-19 toll in the onetime European epicentre is 30,395.

The Vatican Museums are also gearing up to resume visits to the Sistine Chapel, Vatican Gardens and papal estate outside Rome after a two-month coronavirus lockdown.

New protocols will require reservations in advance, protective masks and likely afternoon and evening visiting to stagger crowds.

UK

The British government is making two billion pounds available to boost cycling and walking once lockdown restrictions are eased.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said at the government's daily briefing that the package to put cycling and walking at "the heart of our transport policy" will be necessary, even after public transport networks get back to normal during the coronavirus pandemic.

Spain

Spain's Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez says loosening the nearly two-month lockdown will be for naught if people don't obey social distancing rules.

He reminded Spaniards today, two days before 51 per cent of the nation of 47 million will be allowed to sit at outdoor cafes, "the virus has not disappeared".

On Monday, many regions not as hard hit by the virus will permit gatherings of up to 10 people and reopen churches, theatres, outdoor markets and other establishments with limits on occupancy.

Germany

A Germany union that represents workers in the food industry says recent coronavirus outbreaks in slaughterhouses were the result of "a sick system".

Freddy Adjan, a senior NGG union official, says the meat industry has for years been relying on "dubious subcontractors" that exploit workers.

"The employers aren't just outsourcing the work, but handily also all responsibility to the subcontractors."

The union wants comprehensive checks and rules for the industry, including for workers' accommodation.

Belarus

Tens of thousands of people have turned out in the capital of Belarus despite sharply rising coronavirus infections to watch a military parade celebrating the defeat of Nazi Germany in World War II.

Belarus has not imposed wide-ranging restrictions to halt the virus' spread. Authoritarian President Alexander Lukashenko has dismissed concerns about it as a "psychosis".

Turkey

Turkey reported 50 new COVID-19 deaths and 1,546 fresh cases Saturday as it prepared steps to return to normal life.

Total fatalities stand at 3,739, while infections number 137,115. According to figures posted on Twitter by Health Minister Fahrettin Koca, 89,480 patients have recovered.

Coronavirus: How to protect yourself and others

Coronavirus: what you need to know

What is the difference between COVID-19 and the flu?

The symptoms of COVID-19 and the flu are very similar, as they both can cause fever and respiratory issues.

Both infections are also transmitted the same way, via coughing or sneezing, or by contact with hands, surfaces or objects contaminated with the virus.

The speed of transmission and the severity of the infection are the key differences between COVID-19 and the flu.

The time from infection to the appearance of symptoms is typically shorter with the flu. However, there are higher proportions of severe and critical COVID-19 infections.

What is social distancing?

Social distancing involved minimising contact with people and maintaining a distance of over one metre between you and others.

When practicing social distancing, you should avoid public transport, limit non-essential travel, work from home and skip large gatherings.

It is okay to go outdoors. However, when you do leave home, avoid touching your face and frequently wash your hands.

For breaking news alerts and livestreams straight to your smartphone sign up to the and set notifications to on at the or You can also get up-to-date information from the Federal Government's Coronavirus Australia app, available on the  and the .

Reported with Associated Press.

Source : 9 News More   

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