Panasonic To Add 5.9K 12-bit RAW Video to S5 and Two-Year-Old S1

Panasonic has announced a firmware update program for its line of Lumix S full-frame cameras that includes the S1, S1R, and S5. Even though the S1 was announced over two years ago, the company will update it to capture 5.9K video at up to 30 frames per second in 12-bit RAW. The age of a […]

Panasonic To Add 5.9K 12-bit RAW Video to S5 and Two-Year-Old S1

Panasonic has announced a firmware update program for its line of Lumix S full-frame cameras that includes the S1, S1R, and S5. Even though the S1 was announced over two years ago, the company will update it to capture 5.9K video at up to 30 frames per second in 12-bit RAW.

The age of a camera doesn’t seem to affect how Panasonic views if it should provide major support to it, as these updates add significant performance enhancements that could very easily be argued should be reserved for a next-generation camera body. While some of these updates are only available to those who paid for additional video enhancements at launch, this level of support so long after release is still worthy of praise.

The S1, S1R, and S5 will all receive major enhancements when the firmware becomes available on July 12.

For those who purchased the Upgrade Software Key DMW-SFU2 — an optional $200 video-focused upgrade that is currently included with new purchases of the camera — the Panasonic S1 will gain RAW video output over HDMI to a Blackmagic Video Assist 12G HDR and will be recorded as Blackmagic RAW. It will be able to record in full-frame 5.9K (5888×3312) at up to 30 frames per second in 16:9 aspect ratio. In a cropped APS-C mode, the S1 will be able to shoot in 4K (4128×2176) at up to 60 frames per second in 17:9 aspect ratio, and 3.5K at up to 50 frames per second in anamorphic.

The Panasonic S5 will get those same RAW recording capabilities, but without needing to have purchased any software upgrades like is the case on the S1. In both cases, 5.9K, 4K, and Anamorphic (4:3) 3.5K 12-bit RAW video data can be output over HDMI to a Blackmagic Video Assist 12G HDR to be recorded as Blackmagic RAW.

This means that Panasonic’s now $1,700 full-frame camera will be able to shoot in 5.9K 12-bit RAW for no extra cost, which rivals the performance of the significantly more expensive S1H.

Panasonic will also be adding L.ClassicNeo and L.Monochrome S as photo styles to both the S1 and S1R.

Additionally, Panasonic announced the Lumix HLG Photo for Adobe Photoshop, which is a plug-in software that will allow any hybrid log gamma (HLG) photo (which is a type of HDR image) shot by any Lumix S camera to be read and edited with Adobe Photoshop. After that, Panasonic says that it is possible to view those HLG photos back as HDR photos on an HLF-corresponding monitor of an HDMI connection with a Lumix S Series camera.

Previously, Panasonic HLG photos would cease to be HLG once brought into an application like Photoshop for editing, and the only way to enjoy the wider color gamut was to view them straight out of the camera. While viewing HLG photos is still complicated, at least now there will be a way to edit them without losing the HDR nature of HLG.

The firmware updates and HLG Photo plugin for Photoshop will be available from Panasonic starting on July 12.

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Instagram Tests ‘Suggested Posts’ That Can Appear Ahead of Friends

Instagram is reportedly testing a feature with a “small number” of users where its “suggested posts” feature will expand beyond just when you’ve reached the end of your feed and will be mixed throughout a browsing experience, possibly coming ahead of posts from those users follow. In a confirmation to The Verge, Instagram says that […]

Instagram Tests ‘Suggested Posts’ That Can Appear Ahead of Friends

Instagram is reportedly testing a feature with a “small number” of users where its “suggested posts” feature will expand beyond just when you’ve reached the end of your feed and will be mixed throughout a browsing experience, possibly coming ahead of posts from those users follow.

In a confirmation to , Instagram says that reception to the “suggested posts” feature was so positive that the company decided to try and mix those suggestions in with the average viewing experience, sometimes ahead of photos and videos from people a user explicitly follows.

Additionally, Instagram is testing new controls that will allow users to add a specific topic of interest for suggested posts as well as the ability to “snooze” the recommendations for 30 days or hide them from a feed entirely. “Suggested posts” is a feature that Instagram added last year, but prior to this small test was only ever seen after a user saw everything from all people they followed that was shared.

This shift would make Instagram theoretically function similarly to how YouTube manages its “home” page, which highlights content that is a mix of videos made by those a user is subscribed to as well as videos that YouTube’s algorithm thinks are of interest. YouTube leans so heavily on this analytics-forward approach that subscriptions have fallen in importance over the years.

If Instagram were to adopt placing suggested posts for all users, it may have a dramatic impact on how the social network functions. Instagram has a vested interest in keeping users on the platform for as long as possible, and keep them coming back. As such, the social network should not necessarily need to put as much value on showing a user content from people they follow as opposed to delivering photos and videos that keep them engaged. As YouTube has shown, just because a person subscribes to a Channel doesn’t mean that the user necessarily wants to see all content that Channel produces.

That’s the theory, anyway, and it might have ramifications in the long term for content creators who rely on Instagram to reach an audience, especially if suggested posts become more popular and show higher engagement than that of specifically followed accounts.

Algorithm-focused approaches have generally superseded ones that focus on giving users complete control over what they see. Facebook and Instagram both ditched a timeline-based approach years ago, and Twitter defaults users to the “Home” view instead of “Latest Tweets” which uses an algorithm to determine the most interesting content. At least in Twitter’s case, switching back to Latest Tweets is an option.

Instagram did not specify how many people its “suggested posts” test would affect nor how long it intended to test the feature.

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