Pelosi turns tables on White House, urges eviction ban extension

The lapse of the moratorium this weekend meant millions of tenants around the country faced the risk of losing their homes.

Pelosi turns tables on White House, urges eviction ban extension

Speaker Nancy Pelosi and her leadership team on Sunday urged President Joe Biden to immediately renew and extend the eviction moratorium until Oct. 18 after House Democrats failed to marshal the votes to prevent its lapse this weekend.

Pelosi, Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.), Whip Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.) and Assistant Speaker Katherine Clark (D-Mass.) issued a joint statement Sunday night putting the ball back in the Biden administration’s court, after the White House on Thursday said it could not extend the eviction ban and urged Congress to do it.

“It is clear that the Senate is not able to [extend the ban], and any legislation in the House, therefore, will not be sufficient,” the senior Democrats said. “Action is needed, and it must come from the administration."

The statement from House leadership marked the latest escalation of tensions between congressional Democrats and the Biden administration over the fate of the eviction moratorium, which ended Saturday after being first implemented by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in September.

Progressive lawmakers including Reps. Cori Bush (D-Mo.), Ayanna Pressley (D-Mass.) and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) also urged Biden to maintain the ban in a letter this weekend and staged a protest at the Capitol.

The White House announced Thursday that it would let the ban lapse because the Supreme Court indicated in late June that legislation would be necessary to extend it a fifth time.

Biden’s call for Congress to step in set off a two-day scramble in the House. More than a dozen House Democrats opposed a plan to extend the moratorium, which was challenged by landlords who warned it cost them billions of dollars each month.

Pelosi and her team said Sunday night that as the CDC doubles down on mask-wearing and vaccination efforts, "science and reason demand that they must also extend the moratorium in light of the Delta variant."

“Doing so is a moral imperative to keep people from being put out on the street which also contributes to the public health emergency," they said.

The senior Democrats requested that the Treasury Department shed light on how state and local governments could more efficiently deliver the $46.5 billion in rental assistance Congress has authorized since December. As of the end of June, only 6.5 percent of the funds had been disbursed.

The lapse of the moratorium this weekend meant millions of tenants around the country faced the risk of losing their homes. About 7.4 million adult tenants reported they were behind on rent in the latest U.S. Census Bureau survey, which was taken during the last week of June and the first week of July. About 3.6 million tenant households said they were “somewhat likely” or “very likely” to face eviction over the next two months.

Source : Politico USA More   

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Clock Runs Out On Mets In Attempt To Sign Top Pick Kumar Rocker

The New York Mets failed to sign their top pick from last month's amateur draft, Vanderbilt pitcher Kumar Rocker, by Sunday's 5 p.m. EDT deadline, over concern about his medical scans.

Clock Runs Out On Mets In Attempt To Sign Top Pick Kumar Rocker

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork/AP) — The New York Mets failed to sign their top pick from last month’s amateur draft, Vanderbilt pitcher Kumar Rocker, by Sunday’s 5 p.m. EDT deadline, over concern about his medical scans.

New York selected Rocker with the 10th overall pick and will receive an extra selection in next year’s amateur draft, the pick after the 10th choice, because of their failure to sign the 21-year-old right-hander.

The Mets lost the $4,739,900 slot value available for draft signings that was assigned to Rocker’s pick.

“This is clearly not the outcome we had hoped for and wish Kumar nothing but success moving forward,” Mets acting general manager Zack Scott said in a statement.

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Rocker was a junior and is eligible to return to Vanderbilt for his senior season.

“Kumar Rocker is healthy according to independent medical review by multiple prominent baseball orthopedic surgeons,” his representative, Scott Boras, said in a statement. “Immediately upon conclusion of his collegiate season, he had an MRI on both his shoulder and his elbow. When compared with his 2018 MRIs, the medical experts found no significant change. Kumar requires no medical attention and will continue to pitch in the regular course as he prepares to begin his professional career.”

Rocker was the only player among the first 29 first-round picks who failed to sign.

Two players finalized agreements on the final day.

Arizona signed Jordan Lawair, a shortstop from Jesuit College Prep in Texas, for $6,713,300, and Miami signed Marlins, Kahlil Watson, a shortstop from Wake Forest High School in North Carolina, for $4,540,790.

This year’s amateur draft was cut from 40 rounds to 20 due to the coronavirus pandemic. Last year’s draft was reduced to five rounds.

READ MORE: Rizzo Shines Again, Yankees Complete Sweep Of Marlins

The Mets spent $3,407,900 of the $4,286,400 remaining in their signing bonus pool, reaching agreements with their other nine picks in the first round. Failing to sign Rocker left $878,500 unspent.

Texas signed Oregon right-hander Aaron Zavala, the 38th overall pick, for $830,000.

The second-highest pick who failed to sign was Florida outfielder Fabian Jud, also a junior, who was selected by Boston 40th overall.

Pittsburgh signed right-hander Owen Kellington, a high school pitcher for Vermont, for $600,000 after taking him 102nd.

(© Copyright 2021 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

Source : CBS News York More   

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