Pfizer's COVID-19 Vaccine Indemnification Agreement

Vaccine makers have nothing to lose by marketing their experimental COVID-19 shots, even if they cause serious injury and death, as they enjoy full indemnity against injuries occurring from COVID-19 vaccines or any other pandemic vaccine under the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness (PREP) Act, passed in the U.S. in 2005. The full extent of their COVID-19 vaccine indemnification agreements with countries, however, is a closely guarded secret, one that has remained highly confidential — until now. A leaked document broken down by Twitter user Ehden reveals the shocking terms of Pfizer’s international COVID-19 vaccine agreements.1 “These agreements are confidential, but luckily one country did not protect the contract document well enough, so I managed to get a hold of a copy,” he wrote. “As you are about to see, there is a good reason why Pfizer was fighting to hide the details of these contracts.”2 An Ironclad Agreement, All on Pfizer’s Terms The alleged indemnification agreement, reportedly between Pfizer and Albania, was originally posted in snippets on Twitter, but Twitter now has them marked as “unavailable.” Copies of the tweets are available on Threadreader,3 however. The Albania agreement4 appears very similar to another contract, published online, between Pfizer and the Dominican Republic.5 It covers not only COVID-19 vaccines, but any product that enhances the use or effects of such vaccines. Countries that purchase Pfizer’s COVID-19 shot must acknowledge that “Pfizer’s efforts to develop and manufacture the Product” are “subject to significant risks and uncertainties.”6 And in the event that a drug or other treatment comes out that can prevent, treat or cure COVID-19, the agreement stands, and the country must follow through with their order. Ivermectin, for instance, is not only safe, inexpensive and widely available but has been found to reduce COVID-19 mortality by 81%.7 Yet, it continues to be ignored in favor of more expensive, and less effective, treatments and mass experimental vaccination. “If you were wondering why #Ivermectin was suppressed,” Ehden wrote, “well, it is because the agreement that countries had with Pfizer does not allow them to escape their contract, which states that even if a drug will be found to treat COVID19 the contract cannot be voided.”8 Even if Pfizer fails to deliver vaccine doses within their estimated delivery period, the purchaser may not cancel the order. Further, Pfizer can make adjustments to the number of contracted doses and their delivery schedule, “based on principles to be determined by Pfizer,” and the country buying the vaccines must “agree to any revision.”9 It doesn’t matter if the vaccines are delivered severely late, even at a point when they’re no longer needed, as it’s made clear that “Under no circumstances will Pfizer be subject to or liable for any late delivery penalties.”10 As you might suspect, the contract also forbids returns “under any circumstances.” The Big Secret: Pfizer Charged US More Than Other Countries While COVID-19 vaccines are “free” to receive in the U.S., they’re being paid for by taxpayer dollars at a rate of $19.5011 per dose. Albania, the leaked contract revealed, paid $12 per dose,12 while the EU paid $14.70 per shot.13 While charging different prices to different purchases is common in the drug industry, it’s often frowned upon. In the case of the price disparity between the U.S. and the EU, Pfizer is said to have given a price break to the EU because it financially supported the development of their COVID-19 vaccine.14 Still, Ehden noted, “U.S. taxpayers got screwed by Pfizer, probably also Israel.”15 Also, Pfizer makes a point to note that countries have no right to withhold payment to the company for any reason.16 Apparently, this includes in the case of receiving damaged goods. Purchasers of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccines are not entitled to reject them “based on service complaints,” unless they do not conform to specifications or the FDA’s Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP) regulations.17 And, Ehden adds, “This agreement is above any local law of the state.”18 While the purchaser has virtually no way of canceling the contract, Pfizer can terminate the agreement in the event of a “material breach” of any term in their contract. Safety and Efficacy ‘Not Currently Known’ The purchaser of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine must also acknowledge two facts that have largely been brushed under the rug: Both their efficacy and risks are unknown. According to section 5.5 of the contract:19 “Purchaser acknowledges that the Vaccine and materials related to the Vaccine, and their components and constituent materials are being rapidly developed due to the emergency circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic and will continue to be studied after provision of the Vaccine to Purchaser under this Agreement. Purchaser further acknowledges that the long-te

Pfizer's COVID-19 Vaccine Indemnification Agreement

Vaccine makers have nothing to lose by marketing their experimental COVID-19 shots, even if they cause serious injury and death, as they enjoy full indemnity against injuries occurring from COVID-19 vaccines or any other pandemic vaccine under the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness (PREP) Act, passed in the U.S. in 2005.

The full extent of their COVID-19 vaccine indemnification agreements with countries, however, is a closely guarded secret, one that has remained highly confidential — until now. A leaked document broken down by Twitter user Ehden reveals the shocking terms of Pfizer’s international COVID-19 vaccine agreements.1

“These agreements are confidential, but luckily one country did not protect the contract document well enough, so I managed to get a hold of a copy,” he wrote. “As you are about to see, there is a good reason why Pfizer was fighting to hide the details of these contracts.”2

An Ironclad Agreement, All on Pfizer’s Terms

The alleged indemnification agreement, reportedly between Pfizer and Albania, was originally posted in snippets on Twitter, but Twitter now has them marked as “unavailable.” Copies of the tweets are available on Threadreader,3 however.

The Albania agreement4 appears very similar to another contract, published online, between Pfizer and the Dominican Republic.5 It covers not only COVID-19 vaccines, but any product that enhances the use or effects of such vaccines.

Countries that purchase Pfizer’s COVID-19 shot must acknowledge that “Pfizer’s efforts to develop and manufacture the Product” are “subject to significant risks and uncertainties.”6

And in the event that a drug or other treatment comes out that can prevent, treat or cure COVID-19, the agreement stands, and the country must follow through with their order. Ivermectin, for instance, is not only safe, inexpensive and widely available but has been found to reduce COVID-19 mortality by 81%.7 Yet, it continues to be ignored in favor of more expensive, and less effective, treatments and mass experimental vaccination.

“If you were wondering why #Ivermectin was suppressed,” Ehden wrote, “well, it is because the agreement that countries had with Pfizer does not allow them to escape their contract, which states that even if a drug will be found to treat COVID19 the contract cannot be voided.”8

Even if Pfizer fails to deliver vaccine doses within their estimated delivery period, the purchaser may not cancel the order. Further, Pfizer can make adjustments to the number of contracted doses and their delivery schedule, “based on principles to be determined by Pfizer,” and the country buying the vaccines must “agree to any revision.”9

It doesn’t matter if the vaccines are delivered severely late, even at a point when they’re no longer needed, as it’s made clear that “Under no circumstances will Pfizer be subject to or liable for any late delivery penalties.”10 As you might suspect, the contract also forbids returns “under any circumstances.”

The Big Secret: Pfizer Charged US More Than Other Countries

While COVID-19 vaccines are “free” to receive in the U.S., they’re being paid for by taxpayer dollars at a rate of $19.5011 per dose. Albania, the leaked contract revealed, paid $12 per dose,12 while the EU paid $14.70 per shot.13 While charging different prices to different purchases is common in the drug industry, it’s often frowned upon.

In the case of the price disparity between the U.S. and the EU, Pfizer is said to have given a price break to the EU because it financially supported the development of their COVID-19 vaccine.14 Still, Ehden noted, “U.S. taxpayers got screwed by Pfizer, probably also Israel.”15 Also, Pfizer makes a point to note that countries have no right to withhold payment to the company for any reason.16

Apparently, this includes in the case of receiving damaged goods. Purchasers of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccines are not entitled to reject them “based on service complaints,” unless they do not conform to specifications or the FDA’s Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP) regulations.17 And, Ehden adds, “This agreement is above any local law of the state.”18

While the purchaser has virtually no way of canceling the contract, Pfizer can terminate the agreement in the event of a “material breach” of any term in their contract.

Safety and Efficacy ‘Not Currently Known’

The purchaser of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine must also acknowledge two facts that have largely been brushed under the rug: Both their efficacy and risks are unknown. According to section 5.5 of the contract:19

“Purchaser acknowledges that the Vaccine and materials related to the Vaccine, and their components and constituent materials are being rapidly developed due to the emergency circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic and will continue to be studied after provision of the Vaccine to Purchaser under this Agreement.

Purchaser further acknowledges that the long-term effects and efficacy of the Vaccine are not currently known and that there may be adverse effects of the Vaccine that are not currently known.”

Indemnification by the purchaser is also explicitly required by the contract, which states, under section 8.1:20

“Purchaser hereby agrees to indemnify, defend and hold harmless Pfizer, BioNTech, each of their Affiliates, contractors, sub-contractors, licensors, licensees, sub-licensees, distributors, contract manufacturers, services providers, clinical trial researchers, third parties to whom Pfizer or BioNTech or any of their respective Affiliates may directly or indirectly owe an indemnity based on the research …

from and against any and all suits, claims, actions, demands, losses, damages, liabilities, settlements, penalties, fines, costs and expenses (including, without limitation, reasonable attorneys’ fees and other expenses of an investigation or litigation … arising out of, relating to, or resulting from the Vaccine …”

Meanwhile, the purchaser must also keep the terms of the contract confidential for a period 10 years.21

Purchasers Must Protect and Defend Pfizer

Not only does Pfizer have total indemnification, but there’s also a section in the contract titled, “Assumption of Defense by Purchaser,” which states that in the event Pfizer suffers losses for which it is seeking indemnification, the purchaser “shall promptly assume conduct and control of the defense of such Indemnified Claims on behalf of the Indemnitee with counsel acceptable to Indemnitee(s), whether or not the Indemnified Claim is rightfully brought.” Ehden notes:22

“Pfizer is making sure the country will pay for everything: ‘Costs and expenses, including ... fees and disbursements of counsel, incurred by the Indemnitee(s) in connection with any Indemnified Claim shall be reimbursed on a quarterly basis by Purchaser.’”

Buried in the March 17, 2020, Federal Register — the daily journal of the U.S. government — in a document titled, “Declaration Under the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act for Medical Countermeasures Against COVID-19,”23 is language that establishes a new COVID-19 vaccine court — similar to the federal vaccine court that already exists.

In the U.S., vaccine makers already enjoy full indemnity against injuries occurring from this or any other pandemic vaccine under the PREP Act. If you’re injured by a COVID vaccine (or a select group of other vaccines designated under the act), you’d have to file a compensation claim with the Countermeasures Injury Compensation Program (CICP),24 which is funded by U.S. taxpayers via Congressional appropriation to the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).

While similar to the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (NVICP), which applies to nonpandemic vaccines, the CICP is even less generous when it comes to compensation. As reported by Dr. Meryl Nass,25 the maximum payout you can receive — even in cases of permanent disability or death — is $250,000 per person; however, you’d have to exhaust your private insurance policy before the CICP gives you a dime.

The CICP also has a one-year statute of limitations, so you have to act quickly, which is also difficult since it’s unknown if long-term effects could occur more than a year later.

Pfizer Accused of Abuse of Power

As is apparent in Pfizer’s confidential contract with Albania, the drug giant wants governments to guarantee the company will be compensated for any expenses resulting from injury lawsuits against it. Pfizer has also demanded that countries put up sovereign assets, including bank reserves, military bases and embassy buildings, as collateral for expected vaccine injury lawsuits resulting from its COVID-19 inoculation.26

New Delhi-based World Is One News (WION) reported in February 2021 that Brazil rejected Pfizer’s demands, calling them “abusive.” The demands included that Brazil:27

  1. “Waives sovereignty of its assets abroad in favor of Pfizer”
  2. Not apply its domestic laws to the company
  3. Not penalize Pfizer for vaccine delivery delays
  4. Exempt Pfizer from all civil liability for side effects

STAT News also referred to concerns by legal experts, who also suggested Pfizer’s demands were an abuse of power. Mark Eccleston-Turner, a lecturer in global health law at Keele University in England, told STAT:28

“[Pfizer] is trying to eke out as much profit and minimize its risk at every juncture with this vaccine development then this vaccine rollout. Now, the vaccine development has been heavily subsidized already. So there’s very minimal risk for the manufacturer involved there.”

Signs of COVID Vaccine Failure, Adverse Effects Rise

Pfizer continues to sign lucrative secret vaccine deals across the globe. In June 2021, they signed one of their biggest contracts to date — with the Philippine government for 40 million doses.29

Meanwhile, COVID-19 “breakthrough cases,” which used to be called vaccine failures, are on the rise. According to the U.S. CDC, as of July 19, 2021, 5,914 people who had been fully vaccinated for COVID-19 were hospitalized or died from COVID-19.30

In the U.K., as of July 15, 87.5% of the adult population had received one dose31 of COVID-19 vaccine and 67.1% had received two. Yet, symptomatic cases among partially and fully vaccinated are on the rise, with an average of 15,537 new infections a day being detected, a 40% increase from the week before.32

In a July 19 report from the CDC, the agency also reported that the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) had received 12,313 reports of death among people who received a COVID-19 vaccine33 — more than doubling from the 6,079 reports of death from the week before.

Soon after the report, however, they reverted the number to the 6,079 from the week before, indicating by default that no deaths from the vaccine had occurred that week,34 raising serious questions about transparency and vaccine safety.

Many other adverse events are also appearing, ranging from risks from the biologically active SARS-CoV-2 spike protein used in the vaccine to blood clots, reproductive toxicity35 and myocarditis (heart inflammation).36 As you can see in the confidential indemnification agreements, however, even if the vaccine turns out to be a dismal failure — and a risk to short- and long-term health — countries have no recourse, nor does anyone who received the experimental shots.

One question that we should all be asking is this: If the COVID-19 vaccines are, in fact, as safe and effective as the manufacturers claim, why do they require this level of indemnification?

Source : Mercola More   

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‘The Ripple Effect Is a Major Concern.’ Chicagoans Worry About the Aftermath of Lollapalooza as the Delta Variant Surges

While many festivalgoers and businesses hope the music festival Lollapalooza will signal a return to normalcy, epidemiologists are worried about health impacts

‘The Ripple Effect Is a Major Concern.’ Chicagoans Worry About the Aftermath of Lollapalooza as the Delta Variant Surges

When music fan Noah Zelinsky bought tickets to the Chicago music festival Lollapalooza in May, he thought it might signal something of a return to normalcy after more than a year of isolation. “There’s so much pent up excitement, being the first major thing back,” he says. But a lot can change in two months. “Now, there’s a lot of fear countering that.”

This weekend, thousands of Lollapalooza attendees swept into Grant Park in the midst of a spike in the highly contagious Delta variant of the coronavirus. Leading up to the festival, Chicago’s COVID-19 daily case rate was, albeit nowhere near the heights of this spring. Recent music festivals, including the Verknipt festival in Utrecht, Netherlands, and Rolling Loud in Miami, have been connected to outbreaks among their attendees and surrounding communities. And videos from the weekend showed festival workers at the gates , packed crowds with few masks in sight, and completely unsupervised.
[time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”]

Whether or not Lollapalooza, which ran from July 29 through Aug. 1, held COVID-19 at bay could make the festival a tipping point in whether or not the country’s triumphant reopening continues as planned throughout the summer and fall. “I think it has the makings [of a superspreader event],” Theresa Chapple-McGruder, a Chicago area maternal and child health epidemiologist, told TIME. “When we’re in a place where rates are rising, we need to put prevention strategies in place. I don’t see how a large festival like this could meet that criteria of slowing the spread.”

Kevin Mazur/Getty ImagesA scene from Lollapalooza 2021 at Grant Park on July 31, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois.

Relaxed safety requirements in the face of rising cases

Lollapalooza has been a Chicago institution for 15 years, regularly drawing 100,000 people each day of the typically four-day event. This year, the lineup included Miley Cyrus, Tyler the Creator and the Foo Fighters, and marked the first major cross-genre festival to return to the U.S. since the pandemic’s start. Lollapalooza’s parent company, Live Nation, worked closely with public officials, including Chicago Department of Public Health Commissioner Dr. Allison Arwady, to implement safety guidelines, including a system to check if attendees have valid COVID-19 vaccine cards, vaccine records or negative tests upon entering, and to advocate that everyone wear masks while on festival grounds.


More from TIME


“It’s outdoors. We’ve been having large-scale events all over the city since June without major problems or issues,” Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot said in a . On Thursday, the first day of the festival, organizers said that 90% of attendees have showed proof of vaccination, with 600 people turned away for lack of paperwork.

However, in the two months since the festival was reannounced in May—when full weekend passes rapidly sold out, perhaps in part because the event was canceled last year—the Delta variant has spread rapidly throughout the U.S., accounting for 83% of new COVID-19 cases, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in late July, with most clustered in unvaccinated populations. The number of new cases reported daily in Chicago had dropped to as low as 34 in late June, but is now back up to, although hospitalizations remain drastically lower than their peak this spring. (Hospitalizations typically lag behind increases in case rates.)

“We’ve seen data suggesting that vaccinated people are more likely to be breakthrough cases now than at other points in time with other variants, and that vaccinated people who are breakthrough cases may spread just as easily as unvaccinated people,” Chapple-McGruder says. “Those two pieces really lead to the concern about community transmission.”

Even as cases continued to rise, Lollapalooza relaxed its requirements for unvaccinated attendees. While Lightfoot had said in May that festivalgoers needed to show a negative COVID-19 test taken 24 hours or less before entering, that number was increased to 72 hours, allowing a much longer window to theoretically contract the virus before the festival. Earlier this month, the Verknipt festival in the Netherlands admitted unvaccinated attendees as long as they had a negative test taken within 40 hours of entering. The festival was later linked to 1,000 COVID-19 cases among its 20,000 attendees, and Lennart van Trigt, a “In 40 hours people can do a lot of things, like visiting friends and going to bars and clubs,” Van Trigt said. COVID-19 tests also aren’t 100% accurate and can be easily faked—and there is a lag between when people contract the virus and when they might return a positive test.

Not all recent similar events have suffered from outbreaks. The Exit Festival, an electronic music festival in Serbia which welcomed some 45,000 people a day, recorded according to a study published a week afterward. Serbia has had relatively low COVID-19 rates, but festival organizers told Billboard that more than half of its attendees were foreign visitors; their monitored sample of festival guests was tested for COVID-19 both when entering the gates and a week later.

On the other hand, there have been reports of numerous COVID-19 cases connected to the hip-hop festival Rolling Loud in Miami two weekends ago. Tens of thousands of people showed up daily to the festival, which did not require masks, vaccinations or negative tests. Last week, the rapper and the actor, among others, announced on social media that they had tested positive for COVID-19. Their infections coincided with a larger spike in Florida at large, in which COVID-19 have risen dramatically.

Potential for spread far beyond Chicago city limits

Critics of Lollapalooza are worried that the festival spread COVID-19 in two dimensions: first in the Chicago area, and second, everywhere people travel back to after the weekend ended. Lollapalooza is a commuter festival—set in the middle of downtown Chicago, with many festivalgoers arriving by public transit from other parts of the metropolis. This weekend, buses and trains on the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) were jam-packed with a mix of unvaccinated festivalgoers and essential workers returning to in-person work, every day of the festival. “Many people who rely on using public transportation are essential workers who don’t have remote accommodations—and there’s going to be a domino effect, where they’re going to be on the same CTA car or [in the same] bars and restaurants as all these people coming in from outside the city,” says Elena Gormley, an organizer for Social Service Workers United-Chicago.

If the festival turns out to be a superspreading event, there could be significant trickle-down effects. Mayor Lightfoot that if Chicago’s daily case rate jumps over 200, she would consider reimplementing a mask mandate as well as other measures. Jim DeRogatis, a longtime prominent Chicago music journalist, told the Washington Post that the impact of another shutdown on Chicago’s independent venues could be catastrophic. “If infections start again in a serious way and the city has to start shutting down again, I don’t see how they survive,” he said.

Others are more concerned about what happens when the festivalgoers return home to places with lower vaccination rates. (About has been vaccinated, which is slightly higher than the national average.) Chicago health officials just added nine states to the city’s travel advisory—including nearby states like Missouri, Arkansas and Tennessee—which encourages unvaccinated travelers from those states to either. But it will be difficult for health officials to track those people if they arrive and leave by car. “We don’t even have to look as far as neighboring states: I think it’s going to be an issue with neighboring counties and cities to Chicago,” Dr. Chapple-McGruder says. “The ripple effect is a major concern for me.”

Putting faith in festival organizers and fellow attendees

On the subreddit r/Lollapalooza, a conversation emerged last week about COVID-19, with some expressing concerns and others readily dismissing them. “If I get it, I get it. I’m gonna enjoy this weekend. Been waiting a fat minute for a someone [sic] normal summer,”.

Noah Zelinsky, who is 21 and from Chicago, attended the festival with his friend Savanna Savoy, 18, who drove down from Minnesota to attend. Speaking to TIME before the festival, they said they had friends flying into Chicago for the festival from across the east coast, and that they were both vaccinated and eager to return to live music—a once-essential aspect of their lives—despite the widespread consternation about the festival they saw online. “Now that there’s an opportunity to go out, it shouldn’t be an issue for those who are vaccinated, since we’re the ones who were staying home for so long,” Savoy says.

Savoy and Zelinsky said they planned to wear their masks for most of the outdoors festival, while acknowledging the organizers’ guidance to stay 6 feet away from people was likely impossible. ( all but confirmed this.) They also planned to go to some of the festival’s afterparty concerts, which took place indoors. “We’re putting a lot of hope in the other people around us,” Zelinsky says.

2021 Lollapalooza - Day 2
Scott Legato/Getty Images,Festivalgoers attend day 2 of Lollapalooza at Grant Park on July 30, 2021 in Chicago, Illinois.

Dr. Chapple-McGruder recommended that festivalgoers wear their masks outside and particularly in crowded spaces, find less-crowded places to eat and take public transit during off-peak hours. “If you live with or can’t avoid contact with high-risk individuals, maybe reconsider your attendance,” she says.

Meanwhile, nearby businesses contemplated the risk-reward ratio, with some taking the plunge into opening up to a wider, more maskless clientele for the potential economic benefits. Billy Dec, who owns the Underground nightclub less than a mile from the park, hosts all-night afterparties for Lollapalooza artists and attendees every year, and welcomed revelers back: “There are a lot of people that are really positive about what the festival is doing for the spirit of a city that this year has been really tough on,” he says. However, he says he planned to keep his club’s capacity much lower than in years past. “We’re going to be over-careful about capacity at the door,” he says. “We’re going to keep our numbers low.”

Table to Stix Ramen, in Evanston, was part of the festival’s Chow Town area; it closed for a full week prior in order to prepare for the potentially huge and hungry crowds. While chef and owner Kenny Chou typically has five employees, he brought 20 onsite and says he discussed the risks with them. “Every one of my staff members is vaccinated and will be attending, with full knowledge of the risk of the delta variant,” Chou wrote in an email. “We know it will be difficult social distancing with this large of a crowd. I trust the coordinators and the Lollapalooza staff to keep everyone safe.”

Source : Time More   

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