PGA Tour to implement revised pace-of-play policy in 2021

The PGA Tour will implement its revised pace-of-play policy in January at the 2021 Sentry Tournament of Champions, according to a report by (...)

PGA Tour to implement revised pace-of-play policy in 2021

The PGA Tour will implement its revised pace-of-play policy in January at the 2021 Sentry Tournament of Champions, according to a report by Golf Channel.

The Tour informed players Friday of the decision previously scheduled to be enacted at the RBC Heritage in April. The plan was derailed by the coronavirus pandemic and the Tour’s resulting 13-week hiatus.

The revised pace-of-play policy revealed in January will punish individual offenders rather than groups out of position as well as create a private observation list and penalties for “excessive shot times.”

The observation list of habitually slow players will include players who take longer than an average of 45 seconds to hit a shot over a 10-tournament period. The 10-tournament period is a rolling window to allow players the opportunity to improve their pace-of-play throughout the season. Players on the secret list will be monitored during rounds and given a 60-second limit on all shots.

Failure to adhere to the time limit will result in a “bad time,” prompting a warning from officials. A second bad time will result in a one-stroke penalty. Each additional bad time will incur another one-stroke penalty. The timing stops if the player goes two holes without a bad time.

The revised policy also increases fines for repeat offenders and those take longer than 120 seconds to hit a shot, otherwise known as “excessive shot times.”

The observation list is not expected to be made public.

“We’re going to focus on the individual habits of the slowest players and the slowest strokes and move in that direction,” PGA Tour senior vice president and chief of operations Tyler Dennis said in January. “These habits are believed to be a significant part of the overall negative perception that pervades the issue of pace of play.”

When the revised policy was introduced in January, Tour players largely applauded the changes.

“It’s been a problem since I’ve played golf. I’m 42 and all we’ve done is talk about it,” Paul Casey said at the 2020 American Express.

The 2021 Sentry Tournament of Champions will be held Jan. 4-7 at Kapalua Resort in Kapalua, Maui, Hawaii.

Source : Golf Week More   

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U.S. Open: Winged Foot gets a thumbs up from players who missed the cut

MAMARONECK, N.Y. - There were no complaints from a trio of players who left Winged Foot after missing the U.S. Open cut. They were actually (...)

U.S. Open: Winged Foot gets a thumbs up from players who missed the cut

MAMARONECK, N.Y. – There were no complaints from a trio of players who left Winged Foot after missing the U.S. Open cut.

They were actually quite complimentary on social media Saturday despite collecting the lion’s share of 1,383 bogeys, 179 doubles and 19 others. Most failed to capitalize when the famed West Course was vulnerable in the opening round and struggled mightily with the wind and the rough and the pins and the greens in the second round.

Eddie Pepperell checked out with a 14-over total of 154, but was ready to go again.

“Upon reflection, and despite playing like a right doughnut, I would do it all again at Winged Foot,” the 29-year-old Englishman tweeted. “It’s simply an awesome golf course. Can’t think of a course that tests you in so many ways. Thanks @USGA for humbling me at the same time as invigorating me.”

U.S. Open: Leaderboard | Tee times, TV | Best photos

The cut was 6-over, three strokes lower than it was in 2006 when the U.S. Open was last played at Winged Foot.

Receptive greens and welcoming pins in Round 1 accounted for the difference.

Phil Mickelson did not look comfortable for one minute at Winged Foot, not even on the driving range. He again took a scenic route carding rounds of 79 and 74, and was up early on Saturday hawking a line of coffee released this week.

“After being beaten up and battered by Winged Foot, it’s nice to find out @ForWellness doesn’t just help my mind and body, it comforts my ego and soothes my hurt soul,” Mickelson tweeted along with a bed-head photo.

To kill time on his flight home, Max Homa solicited questions and was promptly asked what non-golf activity equates to playing Winged Foot.

“Playing Winged Foot is like going for a run,” he tweeted after is 14-over performance. “Ur optimistic to start, ur almost immediately pissed off, there’s a lot of heavy breathing, the views are great, ur wondering why u did this to urself, there’s some self-hate involved, finishing is euphoric, ur gunna do it again.”

Mike Dougherty covers golf for The Journal News/lohud.com. He can be reached at mdougher@lohud.com or on Twitter @hoopsmbd and @lohudgolf.

Source : Golf Week More   

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