Photographers, We Need to Talk About Our Office Chairs

Photographers and editors regularly get overlooked when it comes to a wide range of products. Computers, accessories, you name it, we usually end up buying something originally made for someone else. Never has this been more the case than with our chairs. I’ve been working in the camera industry for more than a decade and […]

Photographers, We Need to Talk About Our Office Chairs

Photographers and editors regularly get overlooked when it comes to a wide range of products. Computers, accessories, you name it, we usually end up buying something originally made for someone else. Never has this been more the case than with our chairs.

I’ve been working in the camera industry for more than a decade and in that time have met hundreds of photographers, seen countless workspaces, and know that pretty much all of us at one point or another struggled with this hugely important question: “What chair should I buy?”

Speaking to some colleagues, very few of them feel satisfied with the choices they were forced to make. Some are using ancient chairs they picked up years ago and haven’t upgraded due to the overwhelming prospect chair shopping comes with. I know someone who is legitimately using a dining table chair and that can’t be good for her back. Others have chairs they like for comfort, but hate how they look. Still others have aspirational chairs that just don’t make a lot of sense from a comfort perspective, but they really nail a vibe.

In all cases, not a single photographer I spoke to felt like they had an easy time buying a chair and none of them felt like the one they bought was made for them.

The office chair of photographer Ted Forbes.

I don’t necessarily blame manufacturers and marketing departments for overlooking photographers and editors in this space since the “idea” of a photographer is someone who is constantly on the road or always on their feet. A photographer stuck at a desk is not really an aspirational image. But the reality of the situation, as we all know, is that actually taking photos is at best a small fraction of how we spend our time. In reality, we spend far more of it sitting on our butts working on our computers editing, emailing, invoicing, and managing a business.

I’m willing to bet that we spend more time in our office chairs than gamers do, yet we are forced to pick over the dearth of options at Staples, Office Max, or Target while gamers get whole lines dedicated to them from every conceivable manufacturer. Even Herman Miller has a “standard” office chair with “gamer” variants.

Another popular office chair choice that does the job, but is aesthetically bland. It’s also $1,200.

The issue of style and aesthetics has, at least for me, become much more of an issue over the last year as I’ve spent so much time in my office due to the pandemic. What was once a utilitarian space is now where I spend so much time I wanted to make it feel homey and welcoming. I’ve managed to do it, but I’m still stuck with this ugly chair.

Now to be clear, I’m not advocating for all gaming chairs. I’m not even advocating for some gaming chairs. I’m well aware that most of them aren’t great and that they generally emphasize style over substance, but at least there are options. Photographers and editors, on the other hand, are either forced to pick up one of those chairs that are designed for Twitch streamers or find something hideous from an office supply store.

And that’s the crux of the issue: the chairs we usually settle for may be comfortable, but they’re often just awful on the eyes. The chair I bought for myself at the start of my career is still available today, and it’s absolutely not one I think matches the aesthetics of the rest of my office. It’s ugly, but it’s comfortable. And that’s the problem. I took the photo below a couple of months ago and there is a reason my chair is not a major player in the image.

Can’t see my chair? That was by design.

There doesn’t appear to be a middle ground, so I’m just asking: is it not possible to have something that is both stylish and substantive?

I don’t necessarily know what would make for a great chair for photographers, but I do know that comfort, good armrests, and a design that doesn’t look like I just rolled it in from an office park are high up there. I just think someone should try, because searching for an “office chair” on a photo-centric dealer website looks exceedingly pathetic (seriously, it’s recommending me folding chairs?). There is an untapped market here, and I hope someone realizes it.

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Omnar Officially Launches the CN26-6 Rangefinder Lens for M-Mount

Omnar is a new lens manufacturer based in the United Kingdom that recently teased that it was producing a new lens using a custom design and repurposed Canon AF-10 optical elements. The lens can now be pre-ordered and will begin shipping in December. Omnar Lenses describes itself as a company that makes unique, limited edition […]

Omnar Officially Launches the CN26-6 Rangefinder Lens for M-Mount

Omnar is a new lens manufacturer based in the United Kingdom that recently teased that it was producing a new lens using a custom design and repurposed Canon AF-10 optical elements. The lens can now be pre-ordered and will begin shipping in December.

Omnar Lenses describes itself as a company that makes unique, limited edition lenses that are designed and assembled by lens enthusiasts, for lens enthusiasts.

“We make lenses without any compromise on mechanical build quality with esoteric, unusual, characterful optical formulas,” the company writes. “Omnar lenses feel the part, and work with you to create images in your very personal style.”

Omnar says that in the world of cinema, lenses are often chosen for image qualities and character, not necessarily the objective measures that are often sought after by photographers. So while cinematographers seek out aberrations such as lens flare, heavy vignetting, or softness for use in films, they also do so without compromising expectations of build quality. This mentality is what Omnar says it uses as the backbone of its lens manufacturing process.

The Omnar CN26-6 is a 26mm f/6, fixed-aperture, rangefinder coupled, snapshot lens for Leica M-mount. The company says that it is designed, manufactured, painted, and assembled entirely in the United Kingdom. It is the company’s first lens and it promises that the build quality is “up there with the best” and is combined with repurposed optics from the Canon AF-10 point and shoot camera from the early 2000s.

“The optics were selected for their point-and-shoot camera aesthetic. When researching these types of cameras, we looked for an optic with medium speed that was mostly made of glass. The chosen optic is a four element in three groups, a modified derivative of the classic Tessar formula,” Omnar explaints.

“The front doublet and middle element glass, followed by a fixed aperture disc, then a rear polycarbonate element. The coated elements help keep the contrast relatively high, with the rear polycarbonate — given the right angle of light — creating a rainbow flare the sort that is more commonly associated with cameras such as the Vivitar UWS, but to a lesser degree.”

The lens is coupled from 0.67 meters to infinity with what Omnar says is a short focus throw. It has close focus uncoupled focusing down to 0.3 meters. Omnar says that the focusing feels light or heavy, depending on preference which is customized per lens. The CN26-6 weighs 100 grams and protrudes a scant 10.5mm from the camera.

Omnar says that the image quality varies depending on whether it is used with a film or digital camera due to how oblique ray angles of light are handled on a variety of digital sensors.

“The optics used in the Omnar CN26-6 were designed to be used in film point and shoot cameras such as the Canon AF-10 and BF-10,” Omnar says. “As such, on film, this lens will create images that have a strong entry level point and shoot aesthetic. You can expect good sharpness with gentle fall off to the edges of the frame. You will also find a moderate vignette and some rainbow flaring if you catch the light just right. When close focusing, bokeh is surprisingly pleasant.”

Below are sample images captured with the lens on a film camera, first with color film:

And then with black and white film:

On full-frame Leica M-mount cameras, Omnar says the image quality varies depending on the era of the camera and its sensor cover substrate.

“To a large extent, the same character traits apply. The central resolution and contrast is high, but the falloff to softer corners is quicker,” the company explains. “Edges may also suffer from color shifts that can be combated by selecting lens profiles in-camera, or post-processed out with software such as corner fix.”

Omnar says that shooting on a dedicated black and white camera or converting to black and white of course removes that color shift. Additionally, enhancing contrast will also increase the effect of the vignette. Below are some examples of digitally-captured images, first in color:

And also in black and white:

The CN26-6 is available in several finishes: Matte Black Chrome Cerakote, Silver Chrome Cerakote, High Gloss Black Lacquer, or even a custom paint that customers can specify. Customization doesn’t end there, as the “Omnar Lenses” logo is engraved on the front but can be replaced with a custom engraving of up to 12 characters.

The Omnar Lenses CN26-6 is available to pre-order starting today from the company’s website. All lenses are painted and made to individual customers’ specifications, and the company says it expects deliveries of pre-ordered lenses to begin in December.

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