Poppy Ajudha Launches Debut Album 'The Power In Us'

Bold new single 'London's Burning' is online now...UK artist Poppy Ajudha will release her debut album 'The Power In Us' on March 11th.The jazz-leaning vocalist has carefully built a stellar catalogue, moving between neo-soul to club tropes while finding riveting expression.Debut album 'The Power In Us' is out on March 11th, and it follows a packed out show in London's EartH venue.Typically in-depth, work on the album has taken place over a huge number of sessions, incorporating a raft of special guests.Poppy comments...“This album is made up of all the things swimming in my mind, from women’s rights, to the right to cross borders, to the power of young people to inspire and be unafraid to rock the boat in the name of progress. Women don’t have to be just what they are taught to be, there is so much more to us than Mothers, Sisters, Daughters, Girlfriends and our relation to men. I want men to engage more heavily in feminism and really see how their defiance against it only holds both women and men back.”“There are so many boxes we put ourselves in; I want us all to break out of them. We are in an era of so much information and I feel the weight that young people take on because we are the generation bombarded with global politics and a million causes that need fighting for. This calls for better understanding around mental health and a society that nurtures us rather than demands of us everything we have until all that is left is our Demons. Every song on this album touches on these issues because they are all I think about everyday, all I see around me in my friends and my family. I hope it flips a switch in your mind, like it did for mine.”New song 'London's Burning' is out now, and the potent vocal contains a fire deep within it. The full video was directed by Stone and Spear, with Poppy explaining:“I wrote this song on the legacy of colonialism and the irony that even when we have taken almost everything from most of the globe, ruining countries and communities throughout history to build our own, we are still so quick to close our doors to those in need, even when it is us who have played the biggest roles in destabilising the countries they come from. It is also a nod to the youth movements desperately trying to change minds and break down stereotypes to create a fairer and more compassionate world.” Tune in now.- - -

Poppy Ajudha Launches Debut Album 'The Power In Us'
Bold new single 'London's Burning' is online now...

UK artist Poppy Ajudha will release her debut album 'The Power In Us' on March 11th.

The jazz-leaning vocalist has carefully built a stellar catalogue, moving between neo-soul to club tropes while finding riveting expression.

Debut album 'The Power In Us' is out on March 11th, and it follows a packed out show in London's EartH venue.

Typically in-depth, work on the album has taken place over a huge number of sessions, incorporating a raft of special guests.

Poppy comments...

“This album is made up of all the things swimming in my mind, from women’s rights, to the right to cross borders, to the power of young people to inspire and be unafraid to rock the boat in the name of progress. Women don’t have to be just what they are taught to be, there is so much more to us than Mothers, Sisters, Daughters, Girlfriends and our relation to men. I want men to engage more heavily in feminism and really see how their defiance against it only holds both women and men back.”

“There are so many boxes we put ourselves in; I want us all to break out of them. We are in an era of so much information and I feel the weight that young people take on because we are the generation bombarded with global politics and a million causes that need fighting for. This calls for better understanding around mental health and a society that nurtures us rather than demands of us everything we have until all that is left is our Demons. Every song on this album touches on these issues because they are all I think about everyday, all I see around me in my friends and my family. I hope it flips a switch in your mind, like it did for mine.”

New song 'London's Burning' is out now, and the potent vocal contains a fire deep within it. The full video was directed by Stone and Spear, with Poppy explaining:

“I wrote this song on the legacy of colonialism and the irony that even when we have taken almost everything from most of the globe, ruining countries and communities throughout history to build our own, we are still so quick to close our doors to those in need, even when it is us who have played the biggest roles in destabilising the countries they come from. It is also a nod to the youth movements desperately trying to change minds and break down stereotypes to create a fairer and more compassionate world.” 

Tune in now.

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Source : Clash Music More   

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Holy Other - Lieve

Unique documents of a specific time and place...Bidston Observatory, whose ambiences were recorded by Holy Other (David Ainley) for ‘Lieve’, sits atop a hill on the Wirral Peninsula near Birkenhead in Merseyside. Built in 1866 using limestone quarried from the hill on which it rests, the original purpose of the observatory was to keep perfect time: a double basement and sensitive atmospheric conditions made the structure well-suited for precise adjustments to the chronometers that were used by captains of ships sailing from the British Isles.In a way, ‘Lieve’, like any music that uses field recordings as part of the compositional process, is also about time. These recordings are unique documents of a specific time and place; they are fleeting, passing moments, yet recording them grants them a certain permanence. They are also highly personal, arising out of a conscious decision to hit record at that precise point. We have no way of knowing what emotions were swirling around in the mind of the recorder, no way of knowing what that person was thinking, no way of knowing what that person heard that appealed so much; we only have the recording.With ‘Lieve’, the album’s tonality gives a clue to what may have been on Ainley’s mind. There is a sort of painful, aching quality on key track ‘Heartrending’, one that is not necessarily gloomy or pensive, but one that is also not overly optimistic. We can hear what we might come to identify, in years to come, and as distance affords some sense of objectivity, as the sound of lockdown – a sheen of uncertainty, of unsettled feelings, of vague hope, of feeling simultaneously connected and isolated.These aren’t, then, straightforward electronic compositions. The inclusion of NYX member Sian O’Gorman processed voice is deployed as a splintered, stuttering texture that floats above pieces like ‘Heartrending, ‘Shudder’ and ‘Whatever You Are, You’re Not Mind’, almost as if Ainley had recorded a faltering solo recital rehearsal through a broken church window. ‘Absolutes’ has a grandiosity in its heavy, sparse drum sequence and a brooding melody, but that melody is warped and non-linear, giving rise to a queasy feeling of restlessness. ‘Up Heave’ – featuring contemplative saxophone from Daniel Thorne – includes strange fades, like when the song you’re listening to on your phone suddenly fades away as a call comes in.‘Lieve’ is not an immediately easy listen, yet a distinct, if muted, hopefulness emerges on ‘Groundless’, which is nudged along on a pretty, beatific half-melody; that same sense of hopefulness rises out of the classical arrangements on ‘Refuse’ and persists through to the album’s conclusion. As the final moments of ‘Bough Down’ play out, Ainley’s sleight-of-hand in The sequencing of his second Holy Other album is revealed, leaving the listener experiencing a cautious fragility and subversive, timeless sense of purpose.8/10Words: Mat Smith - - -- - -

Holy Other - Lieve
Unique documents of a specific time and place...

Bidston Observatory, whose ambiences were recorded by Holy Other (David Ainley) for ‘Lieve’, sits atop a hill on the Wirral Peninsula near Birkenhead in Merseyside. Built in 1866 using limestone quarried from the hill on which it rests, the original purpose of the observatory was to keep perfect time: a double basement and sensitive atmospheric conditions made the structure well-suited for precise adjustments to the chronometers that were used by captains of ships sailing from the British Isles.

In a way, ‘Lieve’, like any music that uses field recordings as part of the compositional process, is also about time. These recordings are unique documents of a specific time and place; they are fleeting, passing moments, yet recording them grants them a certain permanence. They are also highly personal, arising out of a conscious decision to hit record at that precise point. We have no way of knowing what emotions were swirling around in the mind of the recorder, no way of knowing what that person was thinking, no way of knowing what that person heard that appealed so much; we only have the recording.

With ‘Lieve’, the album’s tonality gives a clue to what may have been on Ainley’s mind. There is a sort of painful, aching quality on key track ‘Heartrending’, one that is not necessarily gloomy or pensive, but one that is also not overly optimistic. We can hear what we might come to identify, in years to come, and as distance affords some sense of objectivity, as the sound of lockdown – a sheen of uncertainty, of unsettled feelings, of vague hope, of feeling simultaneously connected and isolated.

These aren’t, then, straightforward electronic compositions. The inclusion of NYX member Sian O’Gorman processed voice is deployed as a splintered, stuttering texture that floats above pieces like ‘Heartrending, ‘Shudder’ and ‘Whatever You Are, You’re Not Mind’, almost as if Ainley had recorded a faltering solo recital rehearsal through a broken church window. ‘Absolutes’ has a grandiosity in its heavy, sparse drum sequence and a brooding melody, but that melody is warped and non-linear, giving rise to a queasy feeling of restlessness. ‘Up Heave’ – featuring contemplative saxophone from Daniel Thorne – includes strange fades, like when the song you’re listening to on your phone suddenly fades away as a call comes in.

‘Lieve’ is not an immediately easy listen, yet a distinct, if muted, hopefulness emerges on ‘Groundless’, which is nudged along on a pretty, beatific half-melody; that same sense of hopefulness rises out of the classical arrangements on ‘Refuse’ and persists through to the album’s conclusion. As the final moments of ‘Bough Down’ play out, Ainley’s sleight-of-hand in The sequencing of his second Holy Other album is revealed, leaving the listener experiencing a cautious fragility and subversive, timeless sense of purpose.

8/10

Words: Mat Smith

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Source : Clash Music More   

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