Popular sunscreen brand recalled after traces of chemical benzene found

Benzene is classified as a human carcinogen, a substance that could potentially cause cancer depending on the level and extent of exposure, the TGA says.

Popular sunscreen brand recalled after traces of chemical benzene found

A popular brand of sunscreen is being recalled after traces of the chemical benzene were found in some batches.

The Therapeutic Goods Administration has issued the alert for the Neutrogena Ultra Sheer Body Mist Sunscreen Spray SPF 50+ aerosol sunscreen, owned by Johnson & Johnson.

All batches with an expiry date of August 30, 2023, or earlier should not be used due to possible health risks linked to benzene, the TGA says.

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Consumers should discard the products and seek a refund via the Neutrogena website.

All unsold product will be removed from the market.

Benzene is classified as a human carcinogen, a substance that could potentially cause cancer depending on the level and extent of exposure, the TGA says.

It is not an ingredient in this product but is sometimes used in medicine manufacturing processes.

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The TGA has limits on these types of solvents and benzene must be below a concentration of two parts per million (ppm) in medicines.

This includes sunscreen products that are listed as medicines in Australia.

Johnson & Johnson product testing detected benzene at concentrations less than 3ppm in two of the 17 batches supplied in Australia.

Exposure to benzene in this sunscreen product, at the levels detected, would not be expected to cause serious adverse health effects, but to reduce the risk to consumers, Johnson & Johnson Pacific made the decision to recall all batches of the affected product supplied within Australia.

Source : 9 News More   

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$10k rebates now available for farmers battling mouse plague

A $10,000 rebate is available for farmers to bait for mice as spring approaches, along with a feared resurgence of a rodent plague in New South Wales.

$10k rebates now available for farmers battling mouse plague

A $10,000 rebate is available for farmers to bait for mice as spring approaches, ahead of a feared resurgence of the rodent plague in New South Wales.

Deputy Premier John Barilaro and Agriculture Minister Adam Marshall said the funds were now available for use.

The rebates are meant to cover up to 50 percent of the costs of zinc phosphide baits.

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"We have made $100 million available for zinc phosphide rebates so that farmers are armed and ready if mice numbers begin to increase as we get closer to spring," Mr Barilaro said.

"This is just one part of the NSW Government's $150 million mice support package which includes household and small business rebates and biocontrol research, reinforcing our commitment to support primary producers and regional communities."

Mr Marshall said zinc phosphide was the best tool available for managing the plague.

"I urge farmers to start monitoring mice numbers on their farms right now and start planning how they will manage the impacts as the population increases as we approach harvest," he said.

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NSW Farmers Association vice president Xavier Martin encouraged farmers to apply now.

Claims can be made retrospectively for baits purchased as early as February 1 this year.

"This is an opportunity to prepare for spring when mice populations are predicted to swell," Mr Martin said.

He said the "ongoing" plague would require flexibility in support from the government.

The NSW Government had previously applied to the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority for permission to use bromadiolone against the mice.

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Mr Marshall said the use of the poison would be like "napalm".

However, in June, the APVMA rejected the application, citing environmental safety concerns.

Experts had raised concerns about the danger the chemical posed to native wildlife, as anything that ate a poisoned mouse stood a high risk of secondary poisoning.

The mouse plague is estimated to have caused more than $1 billion in damage to crops.

Eligible farmers can find out more about how to secure their rebate on the Rural Assistance Authority web page.

Source : 9 News More   

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