Porsche driver in fatal police truck crash to apply for bail

A Porsche driver who allegedly filmed and taunted dying police after a Melbourne truck crash is expected to apply for bail today.

Porsche driver in fatal police truck crash to apply for bail

A Porsche driver who allegedly filmed and taunted dying police after a Melbourne truck crash is expected to apply for bail today.

Richard Pusey is accused of saying "amazing, absolutely amazing" as Leading Senior Constable Lynette Taylor died in the emergency lane of Melbourne's Eastern Freeway last month.

Three of her colleagues, Senior Constable Kevin King and Constables Glen Humphris and Josh Prestney, were also killed when a truck ploughed into the group impounding Pusey's car on April 22.

The 41-year-old mortgage broker had allegedly been speeding at 149km/h and tested positive to ice and cannabis.

He wasn't hurt when the truck veered into the emergency lane because he was urinating on the side of the road, court documents say.

"All I wanted was to go home and have my sushi and now you've "f***ed my f***ing car", Pusey also allegedly told Sen Const Taylor after grabbing his mobile to film the graphic scene.

Pusey is expected to apply for bail in the Melbourne Magistrates Court today, as he faces charges including driving at a dangerous speed and reckless conduct endangering life.

Other charges include failing to render assistance, the destruction of evidence, drug possession, failing to remain after a drug test or render assistance, as well as three counts of committing an indictable offence while of bail.

A major investigation is underway after four police officers were killed in a crash on the Eastern Freeway in Melbourne. The scene remains closed on Thursday, April 23.

Victoria Police Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton has said police would oppose Pusey's bail bid because of the severity of charges against him.

"The actions that we are alleging against him were at the very high end - so we'd be saying that's in the public interest," Chief Comm Ashton earlier told reporters.

Truck driver Mohinder Singh remains in custody charged with four counts of culpable driving causing the officers' death.

Source : 9 News More   

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Chinese ministry document refutes 'lies' by US politicians

China has issued a lengthy rebuttal of 24 "lies" by US politicians, including suggesting the coronavirus may not have originated in Wuhan, and its actions.

Chinese ministry document refutes 'lies' by US politicians

China has issued a lengthy rebuttal of what it says are 24 "preposterous allegations" by some leading US politicians over its handling of the new coronavirus outbreak.

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The Chinese foreign ministry has dedicated most of its press briefings over the past week to rejecting accusations by US politicians, especially Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, that China had withheld information about the new coronavirus and that it had originated in a laboratory in the city of Wuhan.

A 30-page, 11,000-word article posted on the ministry website on Saturday night repeated and expanded on the refutations made during the press briefings, and began by invoking Abraham Lincoln, the 19th century US president.

"As Lincoln said, you can fool some of the people all the time and fool all the people some of the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time," it said in the prologue.

The article also cited media reports that said Americans had been infected with the virus before the first case was confirmed in Wuhan. There is no evidence to suggest that is the case.

Keen to quash US suggestions that the virus was deliberately created or somehow leaked from the Wuhan Institute of Virology, the article said that all evidence shows the virus is not man-made and that the institute is not capable of synthesising a new coronavirus.

The article also provided a timeline of how China had provided information to the international community in a "timely", "open and transparent" manner to rebuke US suggestions that it had been slow to sound the alarm.

Pedestrians in Beijing

Despite China's repeated assurances, concerns about the timeliness of its information have persisted in some quarters.

A report by Der Spiegel magazine last Friday cited Germany's BND spy agency as saying that China's initial attempt to hold back information had cost the world four to six weeks that could have been used to fight the virus.

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The article rejected Western criticism of Beijing's handling of the case of Li Wenliang, a 34-year-old doctor who had tried to raise the alarm over the outbreak of the new virus in Wuhan. His death from COVID-19, the respiratory disease caused by the virus, prompted an outpouring of rage and grief across China.

The ministry article said Li was not a "whistleblower" and he was never arrested, contrary to many Western reports.

However, the article did not mention that Li was reprimanded by the police for "spreading rumours". Though Li was later named among the "martyrs" mourned by China, an investigation into his case also drew criticism online after it merely suggested the reprimand against him be withdrawn.

Rejecting suggestions by US President Donald Trump and Pompeo that the new coronavirus should be called the "Chinese virus" or "Wuhan virus", the article cited documents from the World Health Organisation to say the name of a virus should not be country-specific.

– Reported with AAP

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