Predomination of New Zealand and Australian sides’ defences

Much has been said about the superiority of the New Zealand teams over the Australian teams. A quick look at the events of Round 1 of Super Rugby Trans-Tasman might help us appreciate something of what really sets the two styles of play apart. In principle, if we focus, for example, on the clash between […]

Predomination of New Zealand and Australian sides’ defences

Much has been said about the superiority of the New Zealand teams over the Australian teams.

A quick look at the events of Round 1 of Super Rugby Trans-Tasman might help us appreciate something of what really sets the two styles of play apart.

In principle, if we focus, for example, on the clash between Crusaders and Brumbies, we see that the Australians were more effective in the visits within 22 yards of their opponent than the recent champion from Aotearoa (+15.5 per cent ratio obtained based on quantity of visits to 22 yards of the opponent and tries conquered), although the general average of effectiveness decidedly favours the New Zealanders (56.5 per cent versus 37.3 per cent).

In contemporary rugby, we see that defences far exceed the performance of attacks, and the southern hemisphere is not on the fringes of this reality.

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Returning to the analysis of Crusaders against Brumbies, we see that this match does not escape the exception: despite counting a total of nine tries scored between the two sides, the defences did their job, presenting ratios of 1.1 tackles of the defender for each carry by the attacker which explains, in a way, the relative parity in the conditions of the game and its reflection in the final score.

Team BLU CHI CRU HIG HUR
Own Tackles 85 176 96 158 169
Opponent Carries 62 115 85 133 135
Defensive Effectiveness 1.4 1.5 1.1 1.2 1.3
Team BRU FOR REB RED WAR
Own Tackles 98 82 81 105 129
Opponent Carries 89 59 96 99 130
Defensive Effectiveness 1.1 1.4 0.8 1.1 1

By focusing on set pieces, we see that the Brumbies scrum faced the Crusaders pack at 16 kilograms less in the sum and he paid dearly: more weight, greater dominance and more experience on the side of the New Zealanders tipped the balance in their favour in this facet of the fixed formations that has been gradually losing prominence since 2020.

At the breakdown, we verified the power of the New Zealand teams from the frequency of loss of balls in rucks.

In the case of the Crusaders and Brumbies, the New Zealand side granted one turnover for every 23 rucks executed, compared to one turnover for every 19 Brumbies rucks, making this relationship a general trend for both Kiwis and Aussies.

Otherwise, the effectiveness ratios in the ruck amply support the Kiwi teams.

While it is true that we expected greater prominence from the Kiwi franchises compared to those of Australia, the design of Super Rugby Trans-Tasman was probably decisive for the first round to show the technical superiority of the New Zealand sides’ model over the Australians’.

Although the Aussie teams lost all the games they played in this first round, the Western Force’s clashe against the Chiefs and Crusaders-Brumbies ended with meagre point differences of one and two points in favour of the Kiwi teams.

After all, the differences that exist may be much more apparent than real.

Let’s wait for the development of the tournament to monitor some extra indicators of attack, defence, breakdown and game management.

Source : The Roar More   

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O’Connor re-signs with Reds and Wallabies until 2023

James O’Connor has re-signed with the Queensland Reds and will remain in Australian rugby until the 2023 World Cup in France. The Queensland Rugby Union (QRU) and Rugby Australia (RA) have secured the signature of Reds flyhalf James O’Connor. The 30-year-old has re-signed for the next two seasons that will see him remain at Ballymore […]

O’Connor re-signs with Reds and Wallabies until 2023

James O’Connor has re-signed with the Queensland Reds and will remain in Australian rugby until the 2023 World Cup in France.

The Queensland Rugby Union (QRU) and Rugby Australia (RA) have secured the signature of Reds flyhalf James O’Connor.

The 30-year-old has re-signed for the next two seasons that will see him remain at Ballymore and in Australian Rugby until the 2023 Rugby World Cup in France.

“Queensland is my home. I was born here. I love this State, I love pulling on the maroon jersey, and this is where I want to finish my career,” O’Connor said.

“We have a great team now and I think we are going to do some special things. I’m excited to be part of it and to help take them forward.”

O’Connor captained the Reds to a breakthrough premiership, scoring every point in the 19-16 victory over the Brumbies to secure the Super Rugby AU title a fortnight ago.

MORE TO COME

Source : The Roar More   

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