'Put my foot down': Grandfather 'sped through COVID-19 checkpoint'

A Perth grandfather says he's done nothing wrong after allegedly speeding through a regional COVID-19 checkpoint without a valid reason.

'Put my foot down': Grandfather 'sped through COVID-19 checkpoint'

A Perth grandfather says he's done nothing wrong after allegedly speeding through a regional COVID-19 checkpoint without a valid reason.

Stephen Hall, 83, is accused of failing to stop for police and the army at the Morangup checkpoint, west of Toodyay and north-east of Perth, after 3pm yesterday.

In an exclusive interview with 9News, Mr Hall claims he did stop.

"I gave him my licence, I gave him everything, 'where you going', 'Toodyay, I'm coming back in an hour or so'," Mr Hall said.

Mr Hall said he led police for more than an hour and a half into the Toodyay townsite, before being stopped on Lover's Lane.

"When they found out I was 83, the young girl said, 'you're joking', and I said 'no I'm not'," he said.

Mr Hall's jeep is now being held in Northam, with all four tyres punctured.

He claims the police owed him money to replace the tyres.

"I gave them a run for their money," he said.

"They've never had a run like that I don't think."

Mr Hall said he planned to fight the charges in court.

"I've done nothing wrong," he said.

"But I put my foot down."

Source : 9 News More   

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See what a forensic cleaner has to deal with

From the outside, this suburban Queensland home looks like any other - but inside it is a germaphobe's worst nightmare.

See what a forensic cleaner has to deal with

From the outside, this suburban Queensland home looks like any other - but inside it is a germaphobe's worst nightmare.

Every room is stuffed with garbage, rotting filth and all parts of the home are infested with rats and cockroaches.

Forensic cleaner Martijn Van Lith guided 9News reporter Jordan Fabris through this particular property.

"For me because I've done several thousand. This in general under the hoarding scale ratio would be about four or five (on a five-point scale) but if I base it on my jobs where I've helped people, probably a level two," Mr Van Lith said.

"I've had far worse than what this situation is."

Beyond the obvious clutter, this home is a death trap, Mr Van Lith explained

"You've got cables being insulated with the clothing, you have moisture," he said.

"You have all the food that's decomposing. There are so many risks from fires to health risks."

In one case Mr Van Lith has dealt with, he said one of the clients needed to have a limb amputated due to "flesh-eating bacteria".

Mr Val Lith can never anticipate what a home is going to be like before he steps inside.

"In my car I've always got the appropriate PPE I can use if I need it," Mr Van Lith said.

"We can walk into properties where there's syringes, we could have snakes, rats, broken bottles.

"It's limitless because not one job has ever been the same."

Mr Van Lith specialises in not just cleaning squalid properties but also crime scene and trauma cleaning.

Whenever he is confronted by a new job, Mr Van Lith has a number of factors to prepare for, but one of the most important is the mental health of the client.

Hoarding is a mental illness that may develop alongside other conditions like obsessive compulsive disorder, dementia or schizophrenia.

Mr Van Lith said there was a huge difference between renters who wanted to trash homes, and individuals who needed help to get out of the hoarding cycle.

"Mental health is not a choice. They could have lost someone. They could have depression. They could have limitation due to disability," he explained.

"It's not a choice."

If you are a neighbour to someone with a property like this one, Mr Van Lith suggests reaching out to help.

Readers seeking support can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 or beyond blue on 1300 22 4636.

*Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467.

*MensLine Australia 1300 78 99 78.

*Multicultural Mental Health Australia .

National Domestic Violence Service: 1800 RESPECT (1800 737 732). If you are in immediate danger call triple zero (000).

Source : 9 News More   

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