Renovating A House Checklist: Where to Start

Home renovations provide homeowners with the opportunity to take their house and turn it into a home they’ve always dreamed of – all while increasing the home value.  And, with the change of seasons, maybe you’ve decided it’s time for something new. Whether you recently purchased an older home, or have been living in the … Renovating A House Checklist: Where to Start Read More » The post Renovating A House Checklist: Where to Start appeared first on Redfin | Real Estate Tips for Home Buying, Selling & More.

Renovating A House Checklist: Where to Start

Home renovations provide homeowners with the opportunity to take their house and turn it into a home they’ve always dreamed of – all while increasing the .  And, with the change of seasons, maybe you’ve decided it’s time for something new. Whether you recently purchased an older home, or have been living in the same house for years, you can make your dream home a reality with the help of this renovating a house checklist.

Renovating a house can be a scary concept – where do you start? Who do you call? But before you get overwhelmed, we’ve created a checklist to help answer all your questions and guide you through the home renovation process. From strategizing a plan and budgeting, to hiring a professional and putting the finishing touches on your home, read on to see just how you can make renovating a house that much simpler.

Renovating a house checklist: Where to begin

As you research what to expect during a home renovation, you should also outline your ideas and plans – maybe you’re interested in adding an office or redoing the kitchen, the possibilities are endless. Make sure you know what your goal is for the renovation and keep in mind that the project likely won’t be completed all at once.

To determine your budget, prioritize which projects are on the top of your list and what you can live without. Need help figuring out which renovations you want? Consider popular in your area to help narrow down your options. Make sure to budget for any problems that could arise during the initial structure check as well as any problems during demolition. Creating a budget buffer can give you peace of mind if there are any unexpected issues or surprises down the road. Once you have established your budget, you can begin creating a reasonable time frame to help you stick to a schedule. After planning your renovation, you will need to make sure you have the appropriate depending on the type of projects you have in mind. 

Take this time to look over your plans and decide which professionals to hire when renovating your house. From structural engineers and plumbers, to architects and contractors, there are countless professionals who can help you achieve your home renovation goals.

Renovating a house checklist tools

1) Begin with the fundamentals

For a total house renovation, the rule of thumb is simple: make sure the structure is solid before starting on major projects. This includes checking the foundation, electrical systems, plumbing, flooring, and roofing. Older houses are more likely to develop these problems, but it’s important to check all your bases no matter how old your house is. There are ways for you to confirm the condition of your home’s structure, but when you do start to see issues arise, it is essential that you include a structural engineer to help resolve any problems. 

Foundation 

For look for doors and windows not shutting properly or cracks and gaps along the edges of the wall and floor. If you suspect any issues with the foundation, a structural engineer can help diagnose the problem and create a plan to address any repairs.

Plumbing and electrical 

You should also have your plumbing and electrical systems checked before beginning any renovations. Both plumbing and electrical systems should be up to date so they’re equipped to handle modern day appliances and piping. If your house was built before the 1960’s, it is a good idea to swap out your pipes and wires, making your home more reliable for years to come. 

Roofing

No matter where you live, a strong and protective roof is essential. Knowing when you need it repaired vs. replaced is something you should pay attention to. If the roof is on the newer side, watch for loose shingles and repair as needed. Roof damage that may result in a complete replacement includes wall and ceiling stains from leaks and trapped moisture, attic leaks from damaged shingles, exterior paint peeling from trapped moisture, and cracked shingles. 

Renovating a house checklist demolition

2) Interior demolition

Now, it’s time to start designing your interior. If you planned on demolition, you have two options: DIY or connect with a contractor. Your budget will help determine if DIY or working with a professional is the right option. 

Constructing the inside of your home can mean totally reinventing your living space. Take down walls to open your space up or reconstruct your home’s floor plan and construct new walls. If you upgraded your electrical systems or plumbing, your walls will already be open so now is a good time to insulate and close them with drywall. Starting interior demolition room-by-room will help keep the renovation organized. Here are four interior changes to consider adding to your renovating a house checklist:

Built-ins 

Believe it or not, built-ins can provide value to a home. Built-ins are custom-made, permanent storage that adds character to your home. They come in many different forms –  shelving, dining nooks, closets and much more. Not only are built-ins a great way to save space, but they can help create a unique and long-lasting feature in your home.

Windows

Upgrading windows can not only enhance your curb appeal, but can improve your home’s efficiency. That way you can enjoy the seasons through crystal-clear windows, while also investing in your home’s value. 

Cabinets

Although mostly a cosmetic touch, upgrading your cabinets can enhance the design of any space – kitchen, bathroom, or hallway. If new cabinets are not in your budget, a fresh coat of paint can go a long way to bring a fresh look to a newly remodeled home.

Flooring

Flooring plays a huge role in your home renovation. Should you opt for tiles or carpet? Real wood or vinyl? These are questions that play into your home renovation goal. Maybe you have a pet that likes to scratch up carpet? You may want to opt for tile. Maybe you live in a city with cold winters like , or ? Carpet may be a better fit. Deciding what flooring fits best with your needs will help you answer these important remodeling questions.

Renovating a house checklist - Interior

3) Home furnishings

Now you’re on the home stretch. Home furnishings will tie in everything you have accomplished during this renovation process and bring your home to life. New wall paint, plant additions, pillows, and rugs can make all the difference. Once you incorporate these new pieces in your home, implementing basic feng shui into your space helps ensure your home brings you positive energy.

The commanding position is one of the most important feng shui principles to help align your home. With this position, you are not directly in line with the door, but are facing it. Just make sure your furniture is never positioned so your back is turned to the door.  This simple trick can boost your energy and give you the style you’ve been looking for.

After your home is furnished, the renovation process is complete. Take a deep breath and appreciate your accomplishments. There are many different routes to go about renovating, but we hope this renovating a house checklist will help you start on the right path towards creating your dream home.

The post Renovating A House Checklist: Where to Start appeared first on Redfin | Real Estate Tips for Home Buying, Selling & More.

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Private renters in arrears doubles during the pandemic according to Government data

The number of private renters in arrears in England has more than doubled during the pandemic, according ©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - Private renters in arrears doubles during the pandemic according to Government data | LandlordZONE.

Private renters in arrears doubles during the pandemic according to Government data

The number of private renters in arrears in England has more than doubled during the pandemic, according to new government data.

The latest Household Resilience Study shows that in April-May, 7% of private renters were in arrears, up from 3% in 2019/20, amounting to more than 780,000 renters. Another 9% expect to fall behind with their rents over the next 12 months, despite private rents having fallen in real terms.

Rising bills

With more than a quarter (27%) of private renters having reported difficulties in meeting their heating costs in the same period, the National Residential Landlords Association has warned that with rising bills now adding to their burden, many renters will struggle to pay off Covid-related rent debts.

Chief executive Ben Beadle says that without a targeted package of support, many tenants run the risk of losing their homes needlessly. “The Chancellor needs to address this crisis,” he adds. “His continued failure to act signals to the private rented sector that the government simply does not care about the problem.”

Meanwhile, the Joseph Rowntree Foundation has urged Housing Secretary Michael Gove to make ambitious investment in social housing a key part of his strategy to fix the housing crisis after it found that 956,000 families in England are paying rents they can’t afford in the private rented sector. 

Adverse effects

Both findings come as a Shelter poll reveals the pandemic’s adverse affect on private renters’ mental health: 39% say their housing problems or worries have left them feeling stressed and anxious, 22% say these made them physically sick and 21% report that the problems have negatively affected their performance at work. The charity’s YouGov poll finds the most common problems plaguing renters’ mental and physical health include damp and mould – which affects 26% of all renters – being unable to heat their home (26%), constantly struggling to pay rent (21%) and fear of eviction (19%). 

©1999 - Present | Parkmatic Publications Ltd. All rights reserved | LandlordZONE® - Private renters in arrears doubles during the pandemic according to Government data | LandlordZONE.

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