Rolex Oysterquartz Ultimate Guide & Surprising Facts

Yes, even Rolex joined the quartz movement. Rolex may be known for its robust and reliable mechanical calibers, yet there was a time when the Swiss watchmaking company got on board with the quartz craze, and there are actually quartz Rolex watches. Throughout the 1960s, Japanese firm Seiko and a consortium of Swiss watch brands […] The post Rolex Oysterquartz Ultimate Guide & Surprising Facts appeared first on Bob's Watches.

Rolex Oysterquartz Ultimate Guide & Surprising Facts

Yes, even Rolex joined the quartz movement. Rolex may be known for its robust and reliable mechanical calibers, yet there was a time when the Swiss watchmaking company got on board with the quartz craze, and there are actually quartz Rolex watches. Throughout the 1960s, Japanese firm Seiko and a consortium of Swiss watch brands were competing to create the world’s first quartz wristwatch. Just like the automatic movement that came before, and the keyless winding mechanism before that, electronic timekeeping and in particular quartz calibers, were poised to set off another watchmaking revolution – and both nations were determined to be the leaders. This sentiment often gets lost in today’s narrative about quartz watches as it’s too easy to write them off as cheap timepieces that are not worth a second thought.

However, quartz calibers were the darling tech of the 1960s and 1970s and big players in the watch business wanted a piece of that pie. When Seiko unveiled the Astron in December 1969 as the world’s first quartz wristwatch, it marked the beginning of the bitter battle that’s now described as either the Quartz Revolution or the Quartz Crisis, depending on if you were on the winning or losing side. But before the advent of quartz movements decimated most of the Swiss watchmaking industry, numerous high-end Swiss watch brands – including Rolex – fought back with an arsenal of luxury quartz watches. We take a closer look at the development and evolution of the Rolex Oysterquartz and reveal some surprising facts about this overlooked collection.

The Precursor To The Oysterquartz Was The Rolex Date 5100

Quartz Rolex Watches

The first Rolex quartz watch was the limited-series Date 5100, powered by the Beta 21 movement. The development of the Beta 21 quartz caliber was the result of more than 20 Swiss watch brands uniting to form the Centre Electronique Horloger (CEH). The CEH’s mission was to create Swiss-made quartz movements to rival those that were made by other countries. The Beta 21 made its debut in 1969 (following the Beta-1 and Beta-2) and around 6,000 Beta-21 quartz calibers were made. Models like the Omega Electroquartz, IWC Da Vinci, Patek Philippe 3578, and Rolex Date 5100 all ran on the Beta-21 movement.

Released in 1970, it was originally thought that Rolex produced 1,000 pieces of the Date ref. 5100. However, since each watch is individually numbered and there have been some examples found on the secondary market numbered higher than 1,000, some theorize that there may have been two batches of one thousand pieces made. Regardless of the exact number, the Date 5100 apparently sold out quickly and many collectors assert that the entire batch was pre-sold before production even started.

Not only was the quartz movement inside the watch a first for Rolex, but the design of the Date 5100 was also unique. Fashioned entirely from 18k yellow gold, the Date 5100 featured a large (around 39mm) and thick angular case to accommodate the large Beta-21 movement, a fluted bezel, and an integrated three-link bracelet with wide center links. This was also the first Rolex watch to have a sapphire crystal, and Rolex later produced white gold versions of the reference 5100. If this design looks similar to the Audemars Piguet Royal Oak and Patek Philippe Nautilus that’s probably because, according to respected Rolex scholar James Dowling, Gerald Genta designed the Rolex Date 5100.

Despite the initial success of the Date 5100 (now affectionately known as the “Rolex Texan”) and its Beta-21 movement, fiercely independent Rolex did not think that it was in their best interest to offer watches that were equipped with the same movements as so many other companies. Therefore, Rolex ceased to be a part of the CEH and began the development of its own in-house quartz movement.

Rolex Oysterquartz Day-Date Yellow Gold

It Took Five Years To Complete The Oysterquartz Movements

Beginning in 1972, Rolex took five years to conceptualize, design, develop, and test its in-house quartz movements. In 1977 the brand introduced the 5035 quartz caliber for the Oysterquartz Datejust and the 5055 quartz caliber for the Oysterquartz Date-Date models. The Rolex Oysterquartz movements included 11 jewels and a 32khz oscillator. To maintain superior accuracy, Rolex recognized the need for a higher frequency oscillator than the Beta-21 to offset temperature effects so the oscillators of the Oysterquartz movements were four times faster than those of Beta-21. These in-house quartz calibers were hailed as modern marvels when launched and they offered superior accuracy to any of Rolex’s mechanical movements at the time. Additionally, both calibers offered quickset calendar functionality, as well as hacking seconds.

It’s interesting to note that the earliest examples of the Caliber 5035 were not sent to COSC for certification. As a result, Oysterquartz Datejust models made during this period do not have the “Superlative Chronometer Officially Certified” text on the dial. Towards the end of the decade, the Caliber 5035 was sent to COSC along with a small modification: the quartz crystal was changed into a tuning fork shape. Consequently, Oysterquartz Datejust references made from about 1979 onwards include the SCOC designation on the dial. The non-COSC Caliber 5035 movements are known as Mark I while the COSC-certified Caliber 5035 movements are referred to as Mark II movements.

On the other hand, Caliber 5055 was COSC-certified from the start; therefore, all Oysterquartz Day-Date references have the accompanying “Superlative Chronometer Officially Certified” label on the dial.

– Rolex Caliber 5055 – Oysterquartz Day-Date

– Rolex Caliber 5035 – Oysterquartz Datejust

Rolex Oysterquartz Datejust Stainless Steel

The Rolex Oysterquartz Was In Production For 25 Years

Rolex manufactured the Oysterquartz collection from 1977 until the early 2000s. During that time, Rolex made an assortment of Oysterquartz references, divided into Oysterquartz Datejust and Oysterquartz Day-Date lines. Like their mechanical counterparts, Rolex Oysterquartz watches sported 36mm Oyster cases that were available in a variety of materials. However, the shape of the Oysterquartz is much more angular than the classically round automatic versions and the cases are fitted with integrated bracelets – a timepiece aesthetic that was on-trend in the seventies.

The references 17000, 17013, and 19018 were the first Rolex Oysterquartz models that appeared in the brand’s catalog in 1977.

Rolex Oysterquartz Timeline

– 1977: Oysterquartz debut

– 2001: The last year Rolex applied for COSC certifications for quartz movements

– 2002: Steel Oysterquartz models no longer appeared in Rolex catalogs

– 2004: All Oysterquartz models disappear from Rolex catalogs

Rolex Oysterquartz Datejust Watches

– Oysterquartz Datejust 17000: steel case, smooth steel bezel, steel integrated Oyster bracelet

– Oysterquartz Datejust 17013: steel case with yellow gold crown, yellow gold fluted bezel, two-tone integrated Jubilee bracelet

– Oysterquartz Datejust 17014: steel case, white gold fluted bezel, steel integrated Jubilee bracelet

Rolex Oysterquartz Day-Date President

Rolex Oysterquartz Day-Date Watches

– Oysterquartz Day-Date 19018: yellow gold case, yellow gold fluted bezel, yellow gold integrated President bracelet

– Oysterquartz Day-Date 19019: white gold case, white gold fluted bezel, white gold integrated President bracelet

– Oysterquartz Day-Date 19028: yellow gold case, yellow gold pyramid bezel, yellow gold integrated President bracelet with pyramid center links

– Oysterquartz Day-Date 19038: yellow gold case, yellow gold pyramid bezel with 12 diamonds, yellow gold integrated President bracelet with pyramid center links

– Oysterquartz Day-Date 19048: yellow gold case, diamond-set bezel, yellow gold integrated President bracelet

– Oysterquartz Day-Date 19049: white gold case, diamond-set bezel, white gold integrated President bracelet

– Oysterquartz Day-Date 19058: yellow gold case, baguette-cut gem-set (either diamonds, rubies, or sapphires) bezel, yellow gold integrated President bracelet

– Oysterquartz Day-Date 19068: yellow gold case, diamond-set bezel, yellow gold integrated President bracelet with pyramid center links

– Oysterquartz Day-Date 19078: yellow gold case, rainbow gem-set bezel, yellow gold integrated President bracelet

– Oysterquartz Day-Date 19148: yellow gold case, diamond-set bezel, yellow gold integrated President bracelet with diamond-set center links

– Oysterquartz Day-Date 19168: yellow gold case, baguette-cut gem-set (either diamonds, rubies, or sapphires) bezel, yellow gold integrated President bracelet set with gems

– Oysterquartz Day-Date 19188: yellow gold case, diamond and ruby-set bezel, yellow gold integrated President bracelet with diamond-set center links

Rolex Oysterquartz Datejust Rolesor Blue Dial

Less Than 25,000 Oysterquartz Watches Were Ever Produced

Although Rolex produced the Oysterquartz for about 25 years, it’s estimated that fewer than 25,000 Oysterquartz models were ever created. In the realm of Rolex manufacturing, that is an incredibly low number. Remember, Rolex now makes over a million watches per year, so the fact that there are less than a total of 25,000 Oysterquartz watches makes them relatively rare Rolex models to own.

2001 was the final year that Rolex applied for certification from COSC for its quartz movements and select Oysterquartz models remained in the brand’s catalog until 2003. The most common pre-owned Rolex Oysterquartz models available on the secondary market are the Datejust variants followed by the yellow gold Day-Date ref. 19018.

Rolex Oysterquartz Datejust Steel and Gold

The Oysterquartz’s Signature Case and Bracelet Designs Were Used On Mechanical Models Too

Though the angular cases and integrated bracelets are defining design traits of the Oysterquartz, they are not exclusive to these Rolex quartz watches. In fact, a few years before the launch of the Oysterquartz, Rolex had already used these cases and bracelets with two other references.

While Rolex waited for the development of its in-house quartz calibers to finalize, the manufacturer already had the 36mm angular cases ready and waiting. So rather than letting these distinctive cases gather dust, Rolex paired them with the automatic Caliber 1575 movement. This resulted in the 1975 introduction of the Rolex Date 1530 and the Rolex Datejust 1630 – three years prior to the release of the Oysterquartz. The Date 1530 and the Datejust 1630 were short-lived references since Rolex discontinued them in 1977 to make way for the Oysterquartz watches, but you will find Rolex Datejust and Date watches that look like Oysterquartz models but are actually powered by automatic mechanical movements.

– Date 1530: steel case, smooth steel bezel, steel integrated Oyster bracelet

– Datejust 1630: steel case with yellow gold winding crown, fluted yellow gold bezel, two-tone integrated Jubilee bracelet

Rolex Oysterquartz Case Oyster Perpetual Date

Rolex Had Plans For Oysterquartz Perpetual Calendar Watches

In the 1980s, Rolex began working on the next generation of the Oysterquartz movements. In 1987, Rolex filed a patent for a quartz perpetual calendar movement that could be programmed via the winding crown. Rolex made the Caliber 5355 for the Perpetual Calendar Day-Date and the Caliber 5335 for the Perpetual Calendar Datejust, and the brand even created a few prototypes of these perpetual-calendar Datejust and Rolex Day-Date watches. However, these Oysterquartz Perpetual Calendar models never made it to production, and most prototypes (it’s estimated that 11 prototypes were made) were ultimately disposed of or destroyed.

With that in mind, there have been a few examples that have managed to surface at auction. For instance, in 2004, an auction house had to withdraw one from a sale after Rolex filed a civil lawsuit claiming that the watch was stolen property (Rolex lost the suit). Furthermore, a steel Rolex Oysterquartz Perpetual Calendar prototype with a white gold bezel sold for over $250,000 at an Antiquorum auction in 2020. While these mega-rare Oysterquartz watches are out there, you aren’t likely to encounter one out in the wild.

Rolex Oysterquartz Datejust Quartz Movement

Is The Oysterquartz Due For A Revival?

Collectors and enthusiasts have long overlooked the Oysterquartz, preferring to give attention to Rolex watches with mechanical movements instead. However, like any other industry, the watch business has seen its fair share of trends come, go, and then come back again. If you look closely at what other watch brands are doing, you’ll note that there seems to be a growing interest in quartz watches. From the Q Timex Reissue smash hit to the surprisingly refreshing Cartier SolarBeat Must Tank line to cult-favorites from Autodromo, a few watchmakers are here to remind you that quartz movements shouldn’t always be brushed off to the side – after all, they are more precise, more durable, and ultimately more practical than mechanical movements.

This brings us back to the Rolex Oysterquartz.

The Oysterquartz represents an intriguing piece of Rolex history encased in one of the brand’s coolest-looking designs. The watch is still quite undervalued in the pre-owned market when compared to mechanical equivalents – yet, like most vintage and retro Rolex watches, prices for Oysterquartz watches are on the rise. The audible ticking of the Oysterquartz may have some people questioning if it’s a genuine Rolex but for those in the know, that may just be the sound of a soon-to-be collector’s item you wished you had given more attention to in the past.

Rolex Oysterquartz Datejust Integrated Bracelet

The post Rolex Oysterquartz Ultimate Guide & Surprising Facts appeared first on Bob's Watches.

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Rolex Pepsi vs. Tudor Pepsi – Which GMT Watch Is Better?

First off, it is worth saying that having to choose between a Rolex GMT-Master II and a Tudor Black Bay GMT is hardly the worst problem in the world. Either way, you are going to end up with a stunning Pepsi GMT watch and a fair number of envious glances. Rolex and Tudor are of […] The post Rolex Pepsi vs. Tudor Pepsi – Which GMT Watch Is Better? appeared first on Bob's Watches.

Rolex Pepsi vs. Tudor Pepsi – Which GMT Watch Is Better?

First off, it is worth saying that having to choose between a Rolex GMT-Master II and a Tudor Black Bay GMT is hardly the worst problem in the world. Either way, you are going to end up with a stunning Pepsi GMT watch and a fair number of envious glances. Rolex and Tudor are of course sibling companies and their approach to the Pepsi GMT is undeniably similar. However, one is going to cost much more than the other. Not only is the current-production Rolex GMT-Master II Pepsi more expensive than the Tudor Black Bay GMT Pepsi but its resale value is also significantly more. So that leaves us with the question: is the Rolex Pepsi worth that much more than the Tudor Pepsi?

We’ll look at the Rolex GMT-Master II ref. 126710BLRO and the Tudor Black Bay GMT ref. M79830RB in a bit more detail below.

Rolex GMT-Master II ref. 126710BLRO  – “Pepsi”

Pepsi GMT-Master II Key Features

– Year of Introduction: 2018

– Case Size: 40mm

– Materials: Oystersteel (904L Stainless Steel)

– Functions: Time with Running Seconds, Date Display, GMT Functionality

– Dial: Black w/ Luminescent Hour Markers

– Bezel: Bidirectional, Red and Blue Ceramic Insert w/ 24-Hour Scale

– Crystal: Sapphire (Flat w/ Cyclops Lens)

– Movement: Rolex Caliber 3285

– Water Resistance: 100 Meters / 330 Feet

– Strap/Bracelet: Oyster Bracelet or Jubilee Bracelet

– Retail Price (USD): $9,500 (Oyster); $9,700 (Jubilee)

– Pre-Owned Price: $23,000 – $25,000 (approx.)

Click here for our Ultimate Buying Guide on the Rolex GMT-Master II.

Tudor Black Bay GMT ref. M79830RB – “Pepsi”

Rolex Pepsi vs Tudor Pepsi Black Bay GMT M79830RB

Pepsi Black Bay GMT Key Features

– Year of Introduction: 2018

– Case Size: 41mm

– Materials: Stainless Steel

– Functions: Time with Running Seconds, Date Display, GMT Functionality

– Dial: Black w/ Luminescent Hour Markers

– Bezel: Bidirectional, Red and Blue Aluminum Insert w/ 24-Hour Scale

– Crystal: Sapphire (Domed)

– Movement: Tudor Caliber MT5652

– Water Resistance: 200 Meters / 660 Feet

– Strap/Bracelet: Stainless Steel Bracelet; Leather Strap; Fabric Strap

– Retail Price (USD): $3,725 (Strap); $4,050 (Bracelet)

– Pre-Owned Price: $3,500 – $4,000 (approx.)

Click here for our Ultimate Buying Guide on the Tudor Black Bay.

Rolex Pepsi vs Tudor Pepsi GMT Comparison 126710

The Power Of Blue And Red

– Rolex’s BLRO: Bleu/Rouge (French for Blue/Red)

– Tudor’s RB: Rouge/Blue

– “Pepsi” is the nickname given to blue and red bezels

A Rolex GMT-Master with a blue and red “Pepsi” bezel is an icon in the horology world. It was the first example of what would go on to become the most famous, dual time zone watch ever created. Over the more than six decades that followed, the Rolex GMT has always been an option, in one form or another.

The original Bakelite bezels soon gave way to aluminum, which carried the various GMT references all the way up until 2005. That was the year Rolex introduced its Cerachrom (ceramic) bezel inserts to the model; however, the company had not yet perfected a method of applying a twin-color scheme to it. Instead, the GMT’s ceramic bezel was issued in solid black and was missing the split-color appearance that had been a part of the collection since its debut back in the 1950s.

The closest we got to a Pepsi GMT bezel for the next few years was an extremely costly example encircled with rubies and sapphires; however by 2014, Rolex had achieved the method of adding a second color to its ceramic inserts, and a true Pepsi model made its entrance. Unfortunately, it was exclusively fitted to a solid 18k white gold piece, leaving the legendary watch out of most people’s price range. This is largely why 2018’s reintroduction of a Pepsi GMT-Master II in stainless steel stole the headlines for months on end.

Nevertheless, the Rolex masterpiece didn’t have it all its own way. Like the little brother always trying to get one up on his older sibling, Tudor rocked up to Baselworld 2018 with a Pepsi GMT of its own.

Rolex Pepsi vs Tudor Pepsi Comparison Black Bay GMT

The Cost of Tudor and Rolex Pepsi

– Rolex 126710BLRO with Oyster bracelet: $9,500

– Rolex 126710BLRO with Jubilee bracelet: $9,700

– Tudor Black Bay GMT with bracelet: $3,725

– Tudor Black Bay GMT with bracelet: $4,050

Technically, wandering into a Rolex AD and leaving with a Pepsi GMT-Master will set you back $9,500 to $9,700 depending on the bracelet design. For the Tudor, you’ll be parting with $3,725 to $4,050 depending on the bracelet or strap you choose. That is already a massive gulf between the brands, but as we already reported here many times, trying to get your hands on a stainless steel Rolex GMT-Master II at retail is pretty much impossible. The downside of the model’s popularity is, as always, the demand significantly outpacing supply.

This has translated into mammoth waiting lists (not helped by Rolex seeming to distribute as few examples of the watch as possible), in addition to pre-owned pieces that have more than doubled – even almost tripled – the official retail price. An unworn Pepsi GMT-Master II can now fetch as much as $27,000 at auction, and if you have that much lying around, you could probably stretch your budget by several extra thousand dollars and get yourself the white gold version of Rolex’s Pepsi GMT.

Rolex Pepsi vs Tudor Pepsi GMT Comparison 126710BLRO Ceramic Jubilee

About The Rolex GMT-Master II Pepsi 126710BLRO

– 40mm Oystersteel case

– Blue and red Cerachrom ceramic bezel

– Black dial with a date window at 3 o’clock

– Cyclops date lens on the crystal

– Mercedes hands

– Caliber 3285 with 70 hours power reserve

– Oyster or Jubilee bracelet

– Water resistant to 100 meters

There is no denying Rolex’s Pepsi GMT offering is a beautiful watch. The brand’s use of 904L stainless steel, now known as Oystersteel, gives a shine you won’t find from any other manufacturer, and Rolex has redesigned the 40mm case for the GMT-Master II, with the lugs subtly altered for an overall sleeker profile.

Rolex Pepsi vs Tudor Pepsi GMT Watch Comparison 126710 BLRO

The change from the classic, three-link Oyster bracelet to the dressier five-link Jubilee raised a few eyebrows upon its release in 2018. However, it helped give the watch a nice retro vibe, as well as helped differentiate it from the white gold model – which could look very similar at first glance. Rolex now also fits the white gold version with a blue dial to distinguish it further, while the new stainless steel model retains the classic black dial. However, Rolex has now also added the Oyster bracelet as an option with the steel GMT-Master II “Pepsi.”

Inside, resides the Cal. 3285 with some substantial updates over the previous Cal. 3186. Most notably, it includes the Chronergy escapement that first made an appearance in the latest movement used to drive the Day-Date, the Cal. 3255. This completely reworked variation on the traditional Swiss lever escapement purportedly gives an increased efficiency of 15% and combined with a redesigned barrel and gear train, provides the watch with a longer 70-hour power reserve. Like all other contemporary Rolex movements, it is (of course) Superlative chronometer certified and promises an accuracy rating of +2/-2 seconds per day.

However, it is the bezel that everyone comes to see, and it too has caused some discussion. Compared to the aluminum bezels of times past, the colors are certainly on the more muted side. In fact, stand up the contemporary model next to one of the very first examples with a nicely faded Bakelite bezel and there is a definite parallel. With that in mind, the color of Rolex’s ceramic Pepsi bezel inserts has changed over the years, and while the older versions offer a more muted take on the classic red and blue insert, the more recently produced ones are a bit more punchy and bright, although still not quite to the same degree as the older aluminum inserts.

In all, a steel Rolex GMT-Master II with a ceramic Pepsi bezel is just something that should exist in the world (whether or not you are ever able to get your hands on one), and the release of the current version made plenty of Rolex fans happy.

Rolex Pepsi vs Tudor Pepsi Black Bay GMT Comparison

About The Tudor Black Bay GMT Pepsi M79830RB

– 41mm steel case

– Blue and red aluminum bezel

– Black dial with a date window at 3 o’clock

– Snowflake hands

– Caliber MT5652 with 70 hours power reserve

– Steel bracelet, leather strap, or fabric strap

– Water-resistant to 200 meters

If Rolex’s offering dipped its pinky toe into the retro nostalgia, Tudor’s jumped in with both feet. The case is straight out of the 50s archive, elegant and simple, and the absence of guards around the oversized winding crown only adds to the vintage vibe. At 41mm, it is slightly larger than the GMT-Master II as well, making it perfect for those who like a bit more wrist-presence in their tool watch.

The handset is also going to look very familiar to anyone with a passing acquaintance with the brand’s vintage catalog. The hour and seconds hands are given the signature “Snowflake” styling from 1969, as is the tip of the red 24-hour hand.

Rolex Pepsi vs Tudor Pepsi Black Bay GMT Comparison Guide 79830 RB

The matte black dial features a vintage-style chapter ring, and the bezel insert is no-nonsense anodized aluminum. While that could be seen as a step down from Rolex’s Cerachrom, only the aluminum is going to fade and develop an attractive patina over the years, giving the Black Bay a hint of backstory. Here too, the colors are slightly subdued, with Tudor taking the red and blue hues from its diver’s series range and marrying them on the watch’s 24-hour bezel. It is still an aluminum Pepsi bezel, but a much more muted version of it compared to what you will find on older Rolex Pepsi GMT watches.

Despite the merits of its aesthetics, the movement may be the most impressive element. Not so much for its functionality (although it does have quite a lot to offer), but for the fact that it is an in-house mechanism. Back in the day, the reason for Tudor’s much lower price point (compared to Rolex) was mainly due to the fact it used calibers from a third party. Not having to spend money on expensive research and development to build your own engines is a massive cost-cutter, but since Tudor’s return in 2009, it has been on a mission to develop in-house movements.

The Caliber MT5652 inside the Black Bay GMT is one such movement. Based on the highly accomplished MT5612, but with a 24-hour module added on, it offers a similar three-day power reserve as Rolex’s new Cal. 3285, as well as the same balance frequency of 28,800vph. A typically reliable and accurate workhorse, it even has an anti-magnetic silicon hairspring. This practice of developing in-house movements has very much brought Tudor out of Rolex’s shadow, and the brand is now no longer seen as just the more affordable alternative. The current Pepsi GMT watches from Rolex and Tudor are, in fact, almost comparable in every aspect – except for the price.

Rolex Pepsi vs Tudor Pepsi GMT Comparison 1276710 Cerachrom Jubilee

Which Pepsi GMT Is For You? Tudor or Rolex?

So the question is, do you buy a Rolex GMT-Master II or a Tudor Heritage Black Bay GMT? Actually, the better question is, do you buy one Rolex or several Tudors and still have money left over?

The difference in quality between the two is completely disproportionate to the disparity in prices, that much is obvious. The Tudor is a great watch, beautifully built and steeped in enough period details to satisfy the most ardent purist. In addition, the final piece of the puzzle, the homegrown movement, is present and correct. Best of all, you can get a Tudor Black Bay GMT and pay about the same as its regular retail price. Even if your local retailer is sold out, you can find a Black Bay GMT available online and only pay a small premium (if one at all) to get it on your wrist immediately. This is simply not the case with the Rolex GMT-Master II Pepsi. Should you wish to buy one without the wait, plan on spending at least 2 to 3 times more than its official retail price.

However, the Rolex is the real icon, the one everybody wants – not just now, but in the future as well. That means it is going to hold its value far better, should you decide to sell it at any point down the line. On top of that, it has the edge in both technology and brand image. You don’t have to be a “watch guy” to know about Rolex in the same way you do with Tudor – and that has to be a consideration whatever purchasing a luxury product (whether we want to admit it or not). In the end, it is a matter of personal taste. But in the age-old debate of Rolex vs. Tudor, the gap has never been smaller.

Rolex Pepsi vs Tudor Pepsi GMT Comparison Black Bay 79830RB

The post Rolex Pepsi vs. Tudor Pepsi – Which GMT Watch Is Better? appeared first on Bob's Watches.

Source : Bob's Watches More   

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