Rugby bosses exploring every avenue for a return to play

Every organisation and every governing body is working with their government to do what is appropriate to get rugby back on the go.

Rugby bosses exploring every avenue for a return to play

Rugby bosses the world over are looking at the best and safest ways to get back to playing, but nobody can say what that means for the game’s immediate future.

In the South, the Super Rugby season is off while up North there is hope of rounding off the club season and Six Nations.

Rugby wants to start up again when it is safe

Scottish Rugby Chief Operating Officer Dominic McKay said that talks were ongoing and the situation surrounding a return to play was fluid.

McKay said that a massive restructuring of the calendar could be on the cards. 

“I guess everyone’s looking at different ways of when rugby can restart, and doing it in a way that gets the competitions fired up,” McKay told Planet Rugby.

“Everyone is recognising the November series includes teams from the southern hemisphere, it just may not be practical for those teams to travel, so there’s clearly uncertainty around that.

“We’ve been looking at a number of different scenarios in respect of those autumn Test windows.

“Until such time as we’re told otherwise, we expect to have New Zealand, Argentina and Japan in November. But it would be wrong of us not to give consideration to other options, and that’s what we’re doing just now. It’s all talk as it often is in rugby, but as yet we’re not near any firm solutions.

“The priority is around working with the government and trying to do what is as appropriate as possible.

“At the moment, we’re not looking too far ahead, we’re looking at when can we get our players training? When can we give advice to local rugby clubs about it being safe for them to resume training?

“So, I guess, domestically every organisation and every governing body is working with their government to do what is appropriate to them. No one can look too far into the future at the moment.”

McKay said they hoped to complete the Pro14 season but would have to abbreviate the campaign and might not be able to include South Africa’s entrants, the Kings and Cheetahs.

“We are still looking at scenarios that might see some way of potentially finishing the PRO14 season if restrictions allow later in the back end of the summer/beginning of autumn,” McKay said. 

“And that will definitely be a curtailed end to the PRO14 season.

“We are still looking at scenarios, the PRO14 executive are going to come back to us with an update on what might be possible.

“But that is entirely dependent on the various restrictions in the different territories.”

Source : The South African More   

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Zooming with Zumas: South Africa’s new guilty pleasure

In the first episode, Zuma Snr talks about the death of his son, Vusi – who was reported to have succumbed to a short illness in July 2018, however the former president revealed in the broadcast that it was foul play at the hands of his adversaries

Zooming with Zumas: South  Africa’s new guilty pleasure

Former president Jacob Zuma and his son Duduzane are fast becoming Youtube stars, with the launch of  their controversial show, Zooming with Zumas, on the video sharing platform.

Zooming with Zumas features an almost hour-long conversation between the father and son duo and while it may be too soon to tell, it seems no topic is off limits, including those jaw-dropping poisoning claims fit for spy novels.

During a time when a nationwide lockdown has people trapped indoors, mostly turning to good-quality television (in this case, streaming), the show has a bigger audience than it usually would and with the arms deal case less than a month away, South Africans are undoubtedly holding their breath for a possible bombshell.

Coincidentally, the first part of the conversation was aired the same week the Pietermaritzburg High Court postponed the corruption trial against Zuma and French arms manufacturer to June 2020.

Loss and mysterious poison plots

In the first episode, Zuma Snr talks about the death of his son, Vusi – who was reported to have succumbed to a short illness in July 2018, however Zuma revealed in the broadcast that it was foul play at the hands of his adversaries.

“Now that I know what took him is what pains me even more, because I now know it was people who were trying to kill me or to reach me”, said Zuma.

The Zumas also touched on the alleged 2014 attempt to poison the former president, by his now estranged wife Nompumelelo Ntuli-Zuma. The National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) failed to put together sufficient evidence against the former first lady, who has long denied the allegations, and decided in 2019, to not go forward with the case.

In another revelation, Zuma Jnr spoke of how Deputy President David Mabuza, once an ally of the family, stopped communicating with him after the then Mpumalanga premier had to be jetted to Russia for treatment after being allegedly poisoned in 2016.

Zuma on Ramaphosa’s ANC leadership win

The former president said it became evident during the build up to the elective congress that certain factions had been formed and that money played a role during the election.

“The ideological strength of the ANC was being seriously buttered so that you emerge with the kind of ANC that was going to be driven by the money, like a business or even worse. That, in a sense, would have undermined the integrity of the ANC and what it stands for”, Zuma said.

In December 2017, Cyril Ramaphosa was elected the ANC’s President – an election which paved the way for the country’s leadership and in some instances, further expose the division between the ruling party.

Source : The South African More   

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