Russian Su-35 fighters unsafely intercept U.S. Navy P-8A Poseidon patrol aircraft

U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa has confirmed that two Russian Su-35 fighter jets flew in an unsafe and unprofessional manner while intercepting a U.S. Navy P-8A Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft over the Mediterranean Sea. On Tuesday, the service press release said that a U.S. Navy P-8A aircraft was flying in the Eastern Mediterranean over international […]

Russian Su-35 fighters unsafely intercept U.S. Navy P-8A Poseidon patrol aircraft

U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa has confirmed that two Russian Su-35 fighter jets flew in an unsafe and unprofessional manner while intercepting a U.S. Navy P-8A Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft over the Mediterranean Sea.

On Tuesday, the service press release said that a U.S. Navy P-8A aircraft was flying in the Eastern Mediterranean over international waters and was intercepted by two Russian Su-35
aircraft over a period of 65 minutes. The intercept was determined to be unsafe and unprofessional due to the Russian pilots taking close station on each wing of the P-8A simultaneously, restricting the P-8A’s ability to safely maneuver.

The unnecessary actions of the Russian Su-35 pilots were inconsistent with good airmanship and international flight rules, and jeopardized the safety of flight of both aircraft.

While the Russian aircraft was operating in international airspace, this interaction was irresponsible. We expect them to operate within international standards set to ensure safety and to prevent incidents, including the 1972 Agreement for the Prevention of Incidents On and Over the High Seas (INCSEA). Actions‎ like these increase the potential for midair collisions.

This incident follows two unsafe interactions in April, over the same waters. In all cases, the U.S. aircraft were operating in international airspace, consistent with international law, with due regard for safety of flight, and did not provoke this Russian activity.

Photo by U.S. 6th Fleet
Photo by U.S. 6th Fleet

Tensions between Washington and Moscow increased again amid deployment of Russian military aircraft to Libya.

Russian military aircraft, including Mig-29 Fulcrum fighter jets and Sukhoi Su-24 Fencer combat aircraft, were recently deployed to Libya in order to support Russian state-sponsored private military contractors (PMCs) operating on the ground there. At least “six Mig-29 and two Su-24 aircraft escorted by two Russian Air Force Su-35s” have arrived in Libya.

Russia has employed state-sponsored Wagner in Libya to conceal its direct role and to afford Moscow plausible deniability of its malign actions. U.S. Africa Command assesses Moscow’s military actions have prolonged the Libyan conflict and exacerbated casualties and human suffering on both sides.

Source : Aviation Defence More   

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Norway receives three newest F-35 stealth fighters

The three new F-35A multi-role aircraft of the Royal Norwegian Air Force (RoNAF) landed at Orland Air Force Station in central Norway on 26 May after more than 10 hours in the air from the United States. “The three newest editions to Norways increasing fleet of F-35 fighter aircraft arrived at Orland main airstation tonight […]

Norway receives three newest F-35 stealth fighters

The three new F-35A multi-role aircraft of the Royal Norwegian Air Force (RoNAF) landed at Orland Air Force Station in central Norway on 26 May after more than 10 hours in the air from the United States.

“The three newest editions to Norways increasing fleet of F-35 fighter aircraft arrived at Orland main airstation tonight at 21:57 local time,” it said in a statement. “In a few years, in 2025, the F-35s will reach full operational capability.”

Norway is the fourth country after the United States, Israel and Italy to receive the F-35 stealth fighters.

According to Lockheed Martin, Norway joined the F-35 program as a partner in the System Development and Demonstration phase. In November 2008, the Norwegian government selected the F-35 as the replacement for the F-16 fleet. And in September 2015, the first F-35A was unveiled before Norwegian and U.S. government officials and Lockheed Martin leadership at a formal ceremony at the Lockheed Martin production facility in Fort Worth, Texas. See the highlights from that ceremony.

The first two jets for Norway delivered to Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, in late 2015, where they are being used for pilot training.

Norway received its first F-35s three years ago. The country currently has 15 of the fifth-generation stealth fighters, but it has plans to expand its fleet to 52 by 2025, at which point all Norway’s F-16s will be retired.

The F-35 program has long been plagued by cost overruns, delays and global parts shortages. However, costs are being brought down, and the aircraft will be the most advanced in the world, U.S. officials have said.

Besides the United States, 11 other nations are buying the planes.

Source : Aviation Defence More   

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