Samsung and Olympus Cameras are Not Partnering on a Smartphone

Samsung has been repeatedly linked with Olympus cameras, now known as OM Digital, in what was speculated to be a partnership in an upcoming smartphone. PetaPixel confirms this to be false. The original rumor tying the two brands together started in April when a rumor suggested that Samsung was looking to add sensor-shift stabilization into […]

Samsung and Olympus Cameras are Not Partnering on a Smartphone

Samsung has been repeatedly linked with Olympus cameras, now known as OM Digital, in what was speculated to be a partnership in an upcoming smartphone. PetaPixel confirms this to be false.

The original rumor tying the two brands together started in April when a rumor suggested that Samsung was looking to add sensor-shift stabilization into its next Galaxy flagship smartphone. In it, the Olympus brand was tied to Samsung through what looked to be a similar camera partnership to what Vivo has done with Zeiss and OnePlus has done with Hasselblad.

OM Digital had said that it planned to collaborate with other companies that were not in the camera and lens space at CP+ earlier in 2021, but reported in April, there were reasons to immediately doubt the authenticity of the rumored Samsung and Olympus brand partnership.

At the time, Samsung was reportedly working on a new Exynos 2200 processor that was codenamed “Olympus,” which was could have been mistranslated to suggest that the two brands were working together.

Of note, that processor is rumored to be necessary to support a 200-megapixel sensor, which happens to be the resolution of Samsung’s new HP1 sensor that it announced earlier this month and provided a deeper dive into this week.

The hope that a vastly improved camera system led by OM Digital under the Olympus name fueled continued hype, however, as two different renders were produced by LetsGoDigital that showed what such a partnership might look like.

Ironically, it was that this week was told that the rumored partnership was not to be. The publication recently confirmed that it had spoken to an OM Digital representative who said that there was no planned collaboration between the two brands. PetaPixel has confirmed this report, as an OM Digital Solutions representative has said that the team in Japan has definitively stated that no such partnership with Samsung exists.

It should be noted that OM Digital cannot speak for Olympus as the two companies are no longer affiliated. However, it is unlikely that Olympus would be the partner for Samsung and not OM Digital which controls all of the consumer camera and lens-related assets.

This denial is of note as very few manufacturers will ever choose to comment on projects that are in progress or even make statements with regard to rumors, so the strong statement to both LetsGoDigital and PetaPixel should put the expectation of a Samsung and OM Digital partnership to bed.

Source : Peta Pixel More   

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Instagram’s Chief Compares Social Media Dangers to Car Accidents

In response to a Wall Street Journal story that revealed Facebook is aware that social media can harm teens, Instagram’s head Adam Mosseri says the dangers of his app are akin to car accidents, a comparison that has drawn considerable ridicule. After the Wall Street Journal published a story that leaked internal Facebook studies that […]

Instagram’s Chief Compares Social Media Dangers to Car Accidents

In response to a Wall Street Journal story that revealed Facebook is aware that social media can harm teens, Instagram’s head Adam Mosseri says the dangers of his app are akin to car accidents, a comparison that has drawn considerable ridicule.

After the published a story that leaked internal Facebook studies that showed that social media can be toxic to teens, Instagram quickly released a response. The social media company did not deny the findings but claimed the Journal’s article only focused on the negative.

“At Instagram, we look at the benefits and the risks of what we do. We’re proud that our app can give voice to those who have been marginalized, that it can help friends and families stay connected from all corners of the world, that it can prompt societal change; but we also know it can be a place where people have negative experiences, as the Journal called out,” Instagram wrote. “Our job is to make sure people feel good about the experience they have on Instagram, and achieving that is something we care a great deal about.”

In addition to the detailed response on the Instagram blog, Mosseri was interviewed on the Recode Media Podcast where he attempted to defend the negative effects of the platform by comparing social media to cars. As put it, his response uses a metaphor where it seems as though he is saying that just as with the existence of cars, on social media, some people are just going to get run over.

“We know that more people die than would otherwise because of car accidents, but by and large cars create way more value in the world than they destroy,” Mosseri said. “And I think social media is similar.”

Mosseri’s sentiment was met with an onslaught of ridicule as many pointed out that cars, unlike social media, are heavily regulated, regularly inspected, and are illegal to operate for those under the age of 16.

Others noted that the comparison, even taken at face value, is still not a good one. Cars arguably are a net negative as well, as their emissions have been tied to the pollution that causes global warming.

Regardless of Mosserri’s spin, Instagram and Facebook are facing increasing pressure from lawmakers who focus on consumer protection. Last week, two leading members of the Senate Commerce Committee said they would launch an investigation into Facebook and take additional steps to see what other data the social media company might have but is not releasing.

“Big Tech has become the new Big Tobacco,” Representative Ken Buck (R-CO), a member of the House Judiciary Committee’s antitrust subcommittee said in a tweet. “Facebook is lying about how their product harms teens.”

Source : Peta Pixel More   

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