SBA data breach compromises business owners’ data

A spokesperson said the breach affected 7,900 applicants for the Economic Injury Disaster Loans program.

SBA data breach compromises business owners’ data

A data breach in the Small Business Association‘s online application portal may have compromised personal information for nearly 8,000 businesses seeking emergency loans last month, the agency said today.

In a letter to affected business owners, a copy of which was obtained by POLITICO, SBA said it discovered March 25 that the application system for Economic Injury Disaster Loans may have disclosed personal information to other applicants of the program — including Social Security numbers, income amounts, names, addresses and contact information.

In a statement to POLITICO, a SBA spokesperson said the breach affected 7,900 applicants for the EIDL program, which is separate from the Payroll Protection Program loans. The spokesperson did not say how the breach occurred.

“We immediately disabled the impacted portion of the website, addressed the issue, and relaunched the application portal,” the spokesperson said.

The SBA said it will offer applicants a year of free credit monitoring.

Source : Politico USA More   

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DeVos bars undocumented college students from emergency aid

The new guidance prevents undocumented students from accessing the money, although the law includes no explicit restrictions on which students could receive the grants.

DeVos bars undocumented college students from emergency aid

The Trump administration on Tuesday prohibited undocumented college students from receiving emergency federal cash assistance for expenses like food, child care and housing.

The economic rescue law passed by Congress gives $6 billion to colleges to dole out to students for expenses stemming from the disruption on campuses caused by the pandemic. But Education Department officials in new guidance said the money can go only to students who qualify for federal financial aid — U.S. citizens and some legal permanent residents.

That prevents undocumented students from accessing the money, although the law includes no explicit restrictions on which students could receive the emergency grants.

The group that won't receive assistance includes hundreds of thousands of members of the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which has provided work authorization and deportation protections for undocumented people who were illegally brought to the United States as children or overstayed a visa. The Supreme Court is considering whether the program should continue and is expected to issue a decision by June.


Aides to Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said she is following the economic relief law. “The CARES Act makes clear that this taxpayer funded relief fund should be targeted to U.S. citizens, which is consistently echoed throughout the law,” Education Department spokesperson Liz Hill said in a statement.

The Education Department's $6 billion for the cash grants has been slow to reach campuses and and officials have traded accusations with college leaders over the pace of the rollout. As of last week, less than 1 percent of the money had been distributed by the Education Department.

Higher education leaders had specifically asked the Education Department for advice on whether they could use the money to assist DACA recipients.

But the guidance released on Tuesday makes clear that undocumented students cannot receive any of the education stimulus money.

The policy says that students must have filed a Free Application for Federal Student Aid — or at least be eligible to file the form, known as the FAFSA — in order to be eligible for the emergency aid. Undocumented students are not eligible for most types of financial aid provided by the federal government, though they qualify for assistance under some state-based financial aid programs.

The Education Department also said that colleges must provide the emergency cash grants only to students who were studying, at least partially, at physical campuses. Students enrolled in an exclusively online program before the coronavirus pandemic are prohibited from receiving money under the program, according to the guidance.

Source : Politico USA More   

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