Sequel Bits: Top Gun: Maverick, Mission Impossible 7, The Meg 2, and More

In this edition of Sequel Bits: Top Gun: Maverick made quite an impression on Christopher McQuarrie Will a Detective Pikachu sequel ever happen? Tom Cruise hangs off a train in a Mission: Impossible 7 photo The Meg 2 will start production in 2022 And more! Writer/director Christopher McQuarrie is extremely busy making Mission: Impossible movies, […] The post Sequel Bits: Top Gun: Maverick, Mission Impossible 7, The Meg 2, and More appeared first on /Film.

Sequel Bits: Top Gun: Maverick, Mission Impossible 7, The Meg 2, and More

In this edition of Sequel Bits:

  • Top Gun: Maverick made quite an impression on Christopher McQuarrie
  • Will a Detective Pikachu sequel ever happen?
  • Tom Cruise hangs off a train in a Mission: Impossible 7 photo
  • The Meg 2 will start production in 2022
  • And more!

top gun maverick release delay

Writer/director Christopher McQuarrie is extremely busy making Mission: Impossible movies, but as Tom Cruise’s closest cinematic collaborator, he was also brought onto Paramount’s Top Gun: Maverick to help work on the script for that long-anticipated sequel. And in a recent Twitter Q&A, McQuarrie said Top Gun 2 is “the best film I’ve been a part of. I cannot wait to see it unleashed on an audience.” McQuarrie has been behind some incredibly entertaining movies, so that quote should help Top Gun fans breathe a sigh of relief at the prospect of this sequel actually being good.

Speaking of McQuarrie and Cruise, they’re currently working on the next Mission: Impossible movies, which will feature Cruise returning to a train as an action setpiece for the first time in the franchise since the 1996 original. The big difference? The train sequence in De Palma’s movie was clearly enhanced by CG, and this one looks like a more modern-day Cruise stunt that was performed for real and appears to have been very dangerous.

Halloween Kills producer Ryan Freimann shared this image from the set of David Gordon Green‘s upcoming sequel to the Halloween reboot. The car is a throwback to a vehicle that was featured in the original movie on the first night Michael Myers escaped, and coupled with that old school ambulance in the background, I think it’s safe to say this movie will feature a flashback to one of the key moments in the lives of The Shape and protagonist Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis).

The Meg Honest Trailer

Prepare yourself for more shark punching action. In an interview with Collider, The Meg star Jason Statham revealed that production on the sequel is going to begin early next year. “We’re gonna start shooting in January, if I get my dates right,” he said. “Ben Wheatley is the director, I’m very excited to work with him. I’m thrilled to get going, it’s been a while. We’ve been waiting around for the right scripts to come in and the right director to turn up, and we’ve got all those things and they’re all stacked up now…we have a great shorthand already. We’ve got similar taste. I like his movies, I think he’s a brilliant director. I think we’ve got a good shot at making something good.”

Detective Pikachu Early Reaction

Detective Pikachu was meant to kick off a whole series of Pokemon movies, but when it comes to talk of a sequel, there’s been crickets for a long while now. Speaking with Inverse, star Justice Smith said that he would “love to participate in Detective Pikachu 2,” but he is not confident it will ever happen. “I think we have to just kind of bury our hopes. I don’t think it’s going to happen. I really hope so though. Honestly, I’m such a huge fan, who knows, who knows? I hope so.”

Andy Garcia president

This final entry is technically a remake and not a sequel, but bear with me anyway: Deadline reports that Ocean’s Eleven actor Andy Garcia is co-starring with singer Gloria Estefan in another remake of Father of the Bride, following in the footsteps of Spencer Tracy and Steve Martin. Gaz Alazraki (We Are the Nobles) is directing, and Dora and the Lost City of Gold actress Isabela Merced and Adria Arjona (Pacific Rim Uprising) are set to co-star in a version that will tell this tried-and-true story through the lens of a Cuban American family.

The post Sequel Bits: Top Gun: Maverick, Mission Impossible 7, The Meg 2, and More appeared first on /Film.

Source : Slash Film More   

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10 Best Inglourious Basterds Scenes That We Still Think Of Today

Inglourious Basterds, Quentin Tarantino's WW2 epic, is full of iconic moments, from Landa's introduction to Brad Pitt's hilarious Gorlami scene.

After making three crime movies, a carsploitation slasher, and a two-part martial arts epic, Quentin Tarantino turned his sights to the war genre for his next movie, . Tarantino worked on the script for years. At one point, the story was so densely packed that he considered turning it into a TV miniseries. He eventually got the script down to a shootable length and turned it into one of his best movies.

RELATED: Inglourious Basterds' 5 Most Unexpected Plot Turns (& 5 Most Shocking Death Scenes)

From the intense opening standoff on the LaPadite dairy farm to the climactic deviation from historical accuracy, Inglourious Basterds has plenty of unforgettable scenes that fans are still talking about today.

10 The LaPadite Dairy Farm

Tarantino has said that the opening scene of Inglourious Basterds is the greatest scene he’s ever written – a title that previously belonged to the Sicilian scene from True Romance.

In the movie’s opening minutes, a peaceful dairy farm in Nazi-occupied France is intruded by a sinister S.S. colonel – Hans Landa, played by an Oscar-winning Christoph Waltz – on the hunt for Jewish refugees. The scene is a masterclass in building tension.

9 Lt. Aldo Raine Assembles The Basterds

After the opening credits of Inglourious Basterds, Lt. Aldo Raine lines up the titular goon squad and outlines their mission: to go behind enemy lines disguised as civilians and kill as many German soldiers as possible as the war winds down.

Brad Pitt’s charismatic performance as Aldo gets off to a great start in this scene, introducing his Southern charms as well as his penchant for bending the rules.

8 The Bear Jew’s Introduction

When the Basterds capture a German soldier and he refuses to give them the information they want, Aldo invites Sgt. Donny “the Bear Jew” Donowitz out to play. Ennio Morricone’s “The Surrender (La Resa)” sets the stage for the character’s gruesome debut beautifully.

Donny clatters his baseball bat along the wall of a dark tunnel as he slowly approaches the German soldier with the intention of beating him to death.

7 Shoshanna Has Lunch With Landa

When Shoshanna is invited to a lunch with some of the top German brass, she can’t turn it down. So, she has to sit at a table and enjoy small-talk and eat with a bunch of fascist leaders who want her dead.

RELATED: Inglourious Basterds: Every Major Performance, Ranked

The lunch goes okay until they’re joined by another guest: Col. Hans Landa, the man who had her entire family killed. Like the audience, Shoshanna is on the edge of her seat, fearing that Landa will recognize her.

6 The Name Game

There’s a long dialogue-driven stretch in Inglourious Basterds that works brilliantly because of the ticking bomb under the table. For all intents and purposes, it’s just a few rounds of “The Name Game” in a basement tavern.

But a couple of them are Allied spies and there’s a German movie star undercover with them. Audiences spend this scene on the edge of their seats, worried that their cover will be blown.

5 Shoshanna Shoots Zoller (& Vice Versa)

Fredrick Zoller, the focus of the propaganda film Nation’s Pride, takes a liking to Shoshanna Dreyfus in Inglourious Basterds. As a Jewish refugee whose entire family was slaughtered around her by the S.S., she’s not exactly infatuated with a man described as “the German Sergeant York.”

During the premiere of Nation’s Pride, Zoller loses his patience with Shoshanna and she shoots him in the back. When she checks to see if he’s okay, he suddenly turns around and shoots her. She falls back with a burst of blood in slow-motion.

4 Gorlami

The Basterds go undercover as Italians to the Nation’s Pride premiere, except their Italian isn’t great and their accents are even worse. Aldo doesn’t even do an accent — he just says, “Gorlami,” over and over again in his thick Southern drawl.

RELATED: 8 Actors Considered For Roles In Inglourious Basterds

The absurdist hilarity of this sequence is an unexpected turn given that it’s about two concurrent assassination attempts on Adolf Hitler. In this scene, a World War II caper briefly becomes a Marx Brothers screwball comedy.

3 "The Face Of Jewish Vengeance"

Unbeknownst to the Basterds, while they’re plotting to blow up the theater, Shoshanna has her own plan to burn it to the ground. Right before the fire is lit, Shoshanna appears on the screen.

She tells the Nazis she’s about to kill, “This is the face of Jewish vengeance.” As the fire engulfs the screen, Shoshanna laughs hysterically.

2 The Alternate Death Of Adolf Hitler

In the years since Inglourious Basterds hit theaters, alternate history has become one of the defining hallmarks of Tarantino’s filmmaking, just like nonlinear storytelling and graphic violence.

Tarantino’s revisionist version of World War II changes the way Hitler died. Instead of taking his own life in a bunker, he was shot in the face by a couple of Jewish American soldiers.

1 “I Think This Just Might Be My Masterpiece.”

Just when it looks as though Landa is going to get off scot-free and emerge erroneously as the hero of the Second World War, Aldo double-crosses him, killing his associate and carving a swastika into Landa's head so he can never escape from his sadistic past.

Tarantino uses Aldo as a mouthpiece to declare Inglourious Basterds his masterpiece. When Aldo is done carving in Landa’s forehead, he says, “You know something, Utivich? I think this just might be my masterpiece.”

NEXT: Inglourious Basterds: 10 Best Movie References, Ranked

Source : Screen Rant More   

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