Should you buy a 5G smartphone in 2020? Here are the reasons why you should (and shouldn’t)

The year 2020 is earmarked to be the time when 5G hits its stride, but has the technology actually lived up to the industry hype? More importantly, for the average consumer, is this the right time to upgrade to a 5G-enabled smartphone? We can think of a few reasons why you should jump into the […] More This article, Should you buy a 5G smartphone in 2020? Here are the reasons why you should (and shouldn’t), was originally published at NoypiGeeks | Philippines Technology News, Reviews and How to's.

Should you buy a 5G smartphone in 2020? Here are the reasons why you should (and shouldn’t)

The year 2020 is earmarked to be the time when 5G hits its stride, but has the technology actually lived up to the industry hype? More importantly, for the average consumer, is this the right time to upgrade to a 5G-enabled smartphone? We can think of a few reasons why you should jump into the 5G bandwagon, along with more reasons why you need to wait.

3 reasons why a 5G smartphone is a smart choice today

You want a future-proof phone

A wise gadget purchase involves considering hardware specs that don’t become irrelevant in just a short amount of time. Getting a 5G phone ensures you have a device compatible with a new wireless standard that’s expected to be around for most of the next decade. 

5G is better than 4G

This is a no-brainer: 5G is truly in a different league than 4G. It boasts greater bandwidth and faster download speeds (up to 10 gigabits per second, at least theoretically). It also promises a more reliable mobile connection, which means you can stream videos, make video calls and play games with fewer disruptions.

You save time and increase productivity

As the superior tech, 5G allows you to make the most of your time. Imagine all those times wasted on waiting for a download to complete or videos to finish buffering when you could have been doing something more useful.

READ: Is 5G really bad for the health?

4 reasons why now’s not yet the time for a 5G smartphone

You have limited choices of 5G-enabled smartphones right now

With 5G, you don’t have a lot of choices. If you’re constrained money-wise, you’ll have to wait some time before 5G modems are featured in budget-friendly phones. Also, the choices are all Android phones; you’re out of luck if you’re an avid iPhone user (though the iPhone 12 will have 5G if the rumors are true.)

You might pick the wrong 5G smartphone

The 5G modem in the phone you buy today may not be compatible with the 5G that will be deployed in your area. The term ‘5G’ actually encompasses various kinds of next-gen mobile networks.

There’s low-band or vanilla, there’s the midband, and then there’s high-band or mmWave 5G. They perform differently, which means certain phones may be restricted to certain bands. Phones that can support all bands may become widely available in the future, but expect them to be quite expensive, at least initially.

5G coverage leaves much to be desired

Perhaps the biggest letdown is, save a few urban locations, the Philippines has negligible 5G coverage. It will take some years before Globe and Smart can deploy the tech at a national scale. Adding more to the delay is the ongoing pandemic. It’s possible your newly bought smartphone goes out of commission, maybe either due to normal wear and tear or some mishap, before 5G arrives in your location.

4G is good enough already (for now)

The multi-gigabit speeds of 5G are mouthwatering indeed, but the chances of experiencing it are quite low in the next few years, let alone in 2020. Besides, what do you need the speed for?

In most cases, 4G already satisfies our needs. It’s also worth noting that if future 5G towers in your area were to support dynamic spectrum sharing, then they could still operate on 4G. That means your 4G phone won’t necessarily become obsolete. 

Admittedly, there’s only so much praise we can give for 5G technology right now. If you really want it, and can afford it, then buy a 5G-capable smartphone. On the other hand, there are problems that early adopters can and will experience, and they’re troublesome enough to dissuade smartphone buyers from getting 5G smartphones this year (or even in the next few years).

This article, Should you buy a 5G smartphone in 2020? Here are the reasons why you should (and shouldn’t), was originally published at NoypiGeeks | Philippines Technology News, Reviews and How to's.

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Is LWRCI’s IC DI Worth the Price?

I’ve have owned an IC DI model for several years now, and it is a shining example of what a top tier AR-15 maker does at the height of its craft. The post Is LWRCI’s IC DI Worth the Price? appeared first on Guns.com.

Is LWRCI’s IC DI Worth the Price?

Using the CTK P3 Ultimate Gun Rest is one of the easiest ways to help dial in your optics. (Photo: Sean Curtis/Guns.com)

LWRC International, based in Cambridge, Maryland, makes fine rifles. I’ve have owned an IC DI model for several years now, and it is a shining example of what a top tier AR-15 maker does at the height of its craft. By the end of this review, I hope you’ll see why.

Nuts and Bolts

The IC DI is a direct impingement model. This is an important distinction because LWRCI is also known for its quality piston model AR-15s. The DI is an AR-15 chambered in 5.56 NATO that weighs 6.6-pounds. The fluted barrel contributes greatly to this dainty weight. The 16.1-inch cold hammer-forged barrel has a twist of 1:7 and is capped with an A2 birdcage flash hider. The rail is fully free-floated and features M-LOK, 3 QD mounts, and a Picatinny rail on top.

The parts come together to produce a solid rifle that is reliable and accurate. (Photo: Sean Curtis/Guns.com)

LWRCI has a proprietary DI bolt carrier group behind the barrel, and this is housed in a Monoforge upper. The NiCorr-coated gas system is mid-length. If you are into ambidextrous capability, you’re in luck with this rifle. That’s right, from the twin-sided charging handle to the mag release, fire selector, and bolt release, they are equally represented on the left or right side.

The trigger is solid and averaged 4-pounds, 15-ounces on my Lyman Digital Gauge. Being a single-stage, there is barely any travel as you begin pressing back, then it snaps. The reset comes on after about a millimeter release and is both audible and tactile.

On the left side of the receiver, the ambi controls get more interesting. (Photo: Sean Curtis/Guns.com)

Ergonomics

The rifle is well balanced, not clearly tipping one way or the other when I hold it. I also love the light weight! Without a bunch of peripherals like lights, bipods, and other “essentials” bolted on, the DI is easily maneuvered. I have even previously used it in structure clearing training. A few hundred draw strokes during a class, and you appreciate the lightweight package.

This Magpul MOE grip has a nice rubber texture that hangs on to your palm. (Photo: Sean Curtis/Guns.com)

The grip is a Magpul MOE that offers a rubbery outer surface for extra tackiness. It’s at a good angle and is hollow, with a storage cap on the bottom for added utility. The rail is thin enough in diameter that it can easily be handled by most hand sizes. I’d have liked the rail to be longer, but most people wouldn’t have a problem finding a good position for their support hand.

The buttstock is minimalist, fitting in with the weight-saving theme, though it’s got surface area where it counts — on top, so you can establish a good cheek weld. The stock collapses or expands out, having a total of six positions to accommodate shooter preference.

Performance

There are a couple of metrics I consider when evaluating AR-15s. One of them is accuracy at given distances, and the other is reliability. To be clear, I don’t shoot much past 100 yards, so the standard MOA works great for me as a known measurement of accuracy.

I’ve had a Vortex Spitfire AR 1x prism optic mounted on the DI for a few years, and it’s a great fit. The etched reticle is always there, whether you remembered to change the batteries out or not. Remember to regularly swap out batteries, and you can enjoy a pretty cool lit reticle in either red or green colors. The reticle itself has an outer ring, inner ring, and dot in the very center. It’s great for up-close work.

I see a lot of guns over the normal course of a year. Many of them come and go, and I enjoy each experience as I test, photo, and then write about them. However, the Mrs. saw this burnt bronze, RSR exclusive, DI, and it was love at first sight. (Photo: Sean Curtis/Guns.com)

Starting out at the range, I zeroed at 25 yards on a CTK Precision Ultimate Shooting Rest. Less than 1-inch groups are pretty easy at this distance. Eventually, we pushed out to 100 yards. My eyes aren’t what they used to be and seeing the small dot on my target with a 1x magnification was a challenge. However, we were able to hit consistently at this distance, creating groups just under 4-inches.

The rest of the testing consisted of running drills and the normal mag changes that ensued. As far as reliability goes, I’m looking not only for failures to fire or eject but other issues that can cause you to take some action other than shooting to address them. I had no serious malfunctions, like a stovepipe or double feed, to speak of. All in, the rifle has seen around 2,000 rounds of various brands of ammo, with the last 500 consisting of 50-grain Federal. There were no hiccups.

Notice anything different? Look at the diagram on the mat; there are no screws to be staked. (Photo: Sean Curtis/Guns.com)

I had two suspect magazines where the bolt did not remain open on the last shot. Rotating these mags out solved the issue, though. Other than that, the rifle performed flawlessly. The rifle ran hot after a while, but this is common on smaller diameter handguards with repetitive shooting. Recoil is the standard, negligible 5.56 I am used to, and follow up shots were easy to direct and control.

High-End American

While I love black guns, this burnt bronze is a very nice Cerakote option. (Photo: Sean Curtis/Guns.com)

The LWRCI IC DI is an impressive AR-15 with a lot of proprietary features that contribute to the overall performance. The fluted barrel is beautiful and really helps cut overall weight. The internals, such as the Advanced Bolt Carrier Group, are designed to run smoothly for a long time. This all comes at a price, of course.

The MSRP for the IC DI sits around $1,747, though I have seen them for sale online at less depending on model and color. Regardless, the weapon is outstanding, and you won’t regret your purchase. The LWRC IC DI is a quality rifle that will provide you with solid accuracy and dependable service for years to come.

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The post Is LWRCI’s IC DI Worth the Price? appeared first on Guns.com.

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