Sigma Will Release an Affordable 100-400mm Lens for Mirrorless Cameras Very Soon

Sigma is preparing to release a 100-400mm f/5-6.3 ‘DG DN OS’ lens designed specifically for full-frame mirrorless systems like the Sony E- and Panasonic L-Mounts in the very near future. And if the latest rumors are to be trusted, this lens will be extremely affordable (relatively speaking). News of the upcoming lens comes from the […]

Sigma Will Release an Affordable 100-400mm Lens for Mirrorless Cameras Very Soon

Sigma is preparing to release a 100-400mm f/5-6.3 ‘DG DN OS’ lens designed specifically for full-frame mirrorless systems like the Sony E- and Panasonic L-Mounts in the very near future. And if the latest rumors are to be trusted, this lens will be extremely affordable (relatively speaking).

News of the upcoming lens comes from the ever-reliable Nokishita, who posted about it earlier this week in a tweet:

That’s all we got from Nokishita, but earlier today, shared a few more details about the soon-to-be announced lens. According to the rumor site, the lens will be lighter and smaller than Sony’s slightly faster 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 G Master lens, it will feature a linear focusing motor, and it will cost “around $1,000.”

This last number is the most intriguing detail, since it so aggressively undercuts Sony’s own GM lens, which will run you a cool $2,500 as of this writing. It does, however, line up with Sigma’s current 100-400mm DSLR lens (pictured above), which is also stabilized and costs only $800.

No word yet on when these rumors will be confirmed, but based on Nokishita’s record of “announcing” gear about one or two weeks before the official debut, we probably won’t have to wait long to see what the camera and lens maker has in store.

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Diffraction Explained: Why Your Lens is Worse at f/22 than f/8

It’s common knowledge that most lenses are at their best (i.e. sharpest) between f/5.6 and f/8, depending on the lens. But why is that? Why does stopping down further actually make the image softer? This is what YouTuber ZY Productions explains in the video above. As many photographers will already know, the reason a lens […]

Diffraction Explained: Why Your Lens is Worse at f/22 than f/8

It’s common knowledge that most lenses are at their best (i.e. sharpest) between f/5.6 and f/8, depending on the lens. But why is that? Why does stopping down further actually make the image softer? This is what YouTuber ZY Productions explains in the video above.

As many photographers will already know, the reason a lens is softer at f/22 than it is at f/8 is due to a phenomenon called diffraction. But even if you know that—and use it out in the field—there’s a chance you’ve never actually dived into the subject so you could understand what’s happening at the optical level.

ZY Productions wants to fill in that knowledge gap, explaining the physics behind diffraction, why it affects your images, and how it affects your images.

The two most interesting points worth highlighting are (IMO) that (a) lenses get sharper as you stop down because stopping down reduces aberration, even while it increases diffraction, and (b) it’s only when the “blurry points” caused by diffraction become bigger than an individual pixel that you’ll begin to see the effect in your images. This has two consequences that are actually noticeable in the real world:

  1. All other things being equal, a higher-resolution sensor will show the effects of diffraction sooner, because the individual pixels are smaller.
  2. A really well-corrected lens will begin showing the negative effects of diffraction earlier. You can see this in Imaging Resource’s review of Nikon’s 14-30mm f/4S lens for the Z-mount.

But don’t take our word for it. Check out the video above to see a few examples and diagrams that explain all of this in more detail. And if you really want to get nerdy, grab your favorite lens, point it at a highly-textured surface like your couch, and see the impact of diffraction for yourself as you stop down.

(via Fstoppers)

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