Sony a7S III Overheats Faster than EOS R5 in Some Cases: Report

During the a7S III announcement, Sony made much of the heat dissipation technology that allegedly allows the camera to record 4K/60p video internally for over one hour. The implication was clear: “our camera doesn’t overheat.” But at least a couple of reviewers have had a different experience… This “controversy” began with a video by YouTuber […]

Sony a7S III Overheats Faster than EOS R5 in Some Cases: Report

During the a7S III announcement, Sony made much of the heat dissipation technology that allegedly allows the camera to record 4K/60p video internally for over one hour. The implication was clear: “our camera doesn’t overheat.” But at least a couple of reviewers have had a different experience…

This “controversy” began with a video by YouTuber and camera reviewer Dan Watson, who released a comprehensive test of the Sony a7S III at launch, comparing it to the Canon EOS R5 and the Panasonic S1H.

But his in-depth “showdown” video was largely overshadowed by a 1-minute section that starts at the 8:54 mark: the overheating test.

The Sony a7S III ran several degrees hotter than the Canon EOS R5 when recording 4K/60p in direct sunlight.

In his review, the Sony and Canon cameras performed as advertised indoors: well over an hour shooting 4K/60p internally with no issues on overheating, while the Canon EOS R5 shut down around the 25 minute mark just like Canon said it would. So far, nothing unusual. It wasn’t until Dan took the cameras outside into the sun that things changed.

In direct sunlight on a hot Florida day, Watson’s Sony actually overheated faster than the Canon EOS R5 when shooting 4K/60p video: about 23 minutes vs 25 minutes. This finding was corroborated by camera reviewer Hugh Brownstone, who had a similar experience during his own testing.

Inside, he was able to record for 2 hours and 45 minutes without a single hiccup. But skip to the 10:51 mark to see his outdoor tests… in direct sunlight on a hot day, the camera shut down at 23 minutes.

As Hugh explains, this isn’t just about a torture test that’s meaningless in terms of real-world use.

The a7S III’s performance under these admittedly harsh conditions gives us pause, because we’ve shot on the streets of New York to know that this could be a real problem.

Though to be fair, what we also learned is that within 3 minutes of putting the a7S III next to an air conditioning vent, it was ready to go again… still, we don’t need that kind of uncertainty walking into a shoot.

We’ve been waiting to report on this for couple of days, exchanging emails with Dan and keeping an eye on other reviews. Many testers had no problems working with the a7S III for extended periods, outdoors, hand-held, or in direct sunlight. But clearly this isn’t just Dan’s unit.

As a precaution, Dan is getting a second review unit from Sony just in case, and he re-tested his current camera while addressing a lot of the complains in the comments about his methodology… long story short: same result. While shooting 4K/60p video with the Sony’s overheating Auto Off setting on “high,” the a7S III overheated at 29 minutes and the Canon EOS R5 at 34 minutes:

These tests, and others like them, will no doubt spark a hardcore debate between Canon users who are exhausted by all the R5 overheating talk and Sony users who were confident the a7S III wouldn’t have the same issues. But this isn’t about brand loyalty or fanboy debates in the comments.

You can’t be critical of Canon’s (admittedly more serious) overheating issues and excuse Sony’s outright because it only happens in certain circumstances.

Should this keep you from purchasing the camera or using it for serious work? Absolutely not. In most circumstances, it seems the Sony performs more-than-admirably. It’s been called a “technological marvel” for good reason. But if you expect to find yourself shooting for long periods in direct sunlight and hot weather, it’s important to know that the camera is not 100% reliable.

Source : Peta Pixel More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

Co-Creating a Light Painting in Real Time with Someone Across the World

Photographer Dan Roberts recently collaborated on an “intercontinental light painting.” Using a projector and the power of the Internet, he and Frodo Alvarez captured a light-painting portrait in real time from across the world: Frodo’s light from Spain ended up on Dan’s camera in Denver. Enter Dan, who describes the experience below and explains how […]

Co-Creating a Light Painting in Real Time with Someone Across the World

Photographer Dan Roberts recently collaborated on an “intercontinental light painting.” Using a projector and the power of the Internet, he and Frodo Alvarez captured a light-painting portrait in real time from across the world: Frodo’s light from Spain ended up on Dan’s camera in Denver.

Enter Dan, who describes the experience below and explains how you can recreate this neat experiment.


Some Thoughts, Over Time

RECENTLY: I’m in the United States, and we’re not allowed to enter most other countries because we did a horrible job with a global virus.

TWO OR THREE YEARS AGO: “Hey Frodo, I think we should collaborate on a project where you’re in Spain and I’m in the USA and we make an art piece together”

TONIGHT: Hmmmm, I can do the thing with Frodo and I’ll be able to team up with a light painter from another country. Let’s finally do it!!

Lights, Camera… Where’s the Action?

In most light painting photographs the people adding light to the scene are, well, at the same location the camera is, or at least nearby. If you’re waving lights for a camera, that kind of makes sense. The problem with light painters is that we’re often so far away that it’s hard to get together. Even here in Colorado we’re an hour or two apart and don’t meet up as often as we should.

One way to get around this seemed pretty straightforward… connect with a remote friend using video conferencing software, use a projector, try to team up on a light painting. Tonight that happened, and I’m going to tell you how to do it.

What You Need

In order to create a picture the way we did tonight you’ll need the following:

  • A friend who wants to light paint with you
  • A video projector, preferably a short-throw projector
  • Something light to project on to (screen, wall, etc)
  • A computer or phone that can video conference, and hook up to the projector
  • Your standard light painting gear, including your camera

Your friend is going to need:

  • A computer or phone that can video conference, and hook up to the projector
  • Standard light painting gear, but no need for camera

The Setup

The light painter with the projector and the camera will set up the scene.

  • Set up your camera facing the projector screen
  • Your model will stand somewhere between the two, posing for the camera
  • The short-throw projector will sit on the ground between the model and the screen, and will project the video conference ON to the screen.

It’s a good idea to have a short-throw projector, but most people don’t know what those are. This type of projector has a different type of lens that allows a projector to be placed very close to a screen and it will project the image up at a very steep angle, allowing for a large picture to be displayed without having to have a projector quite far from the wall.

Using a projector like this will allow us to but the entire projected image BEHIND the model, and no light from the projector will shine upon the model at all.

If you don’t have a short-throw projector, the next best thing might be a screen that you can project onto from behind. Most people don’t have that either. If you have a normal front projector you can use aspects of this approach, but you’ll likely have to deal with light projecting on your model.

If you have a large TV you can also try that out instead of using a projector, but the area you can work with will be much more limited.

How Tonight Went

Frodo Alvarez (Children of Darklight) set up his space in Madrid. He would connect to us by Zoom video conference. Next time I think we’ll use Skype, or another program that doesn’t display a username on the bottom corner of the screen.

I ran around a lot today, looking for gear I haven’t used since before the pandemic. To be truthful, I haven’t used most of it since the PNW Meteor Jam right after our wedding; it’s been a busy year.

As I was shooting in the middle of the day I used Live Composite on my Olympus. We were in my garage and it was mostly dark, but for a first go this was also a way to ensure that the ambient light from the projector wouldn’t blow out the image. Blacks are black, but projector blacks are usually a little lighter than what we’d like black to truly be.

I front-lit Reagan, and used some black fiber optic to do her contour. Frodo had Wendy (his mannequin) in Madrid, and we lined Wendy’s projector position up with Reagan.

This gave Frodo a human shape to work with that more or less aligned with Reagan, across the world. He went to town with his lights, filling in the background and sides, waving lights in Spain and having them appear for my camera in Denver.

At one point we wanted his light to swoop around Reagan, so at the end of the shot we had her step out and he swooped around Wendy, and the light layered nicely into our picture!

Blue light by Frodo in Madrid; orange light by Dan in the USA; Reagan is our model.

Here’s a video of the process. It’s almost two minutes, there’s a lot of darkness, but it’s actually pretty easy to watch.

If you’d like to see what it looked like in Spain, you can see that here:

A New Way to Collaborate

I can’t believe that multiple years have passed since I first wanted to do this, and with Frodo nonetheless. With all the theory and experience I’ve gained over time, I was sure this would work, but yet it remained unexplored.

Tonight’s experiment can absolutely be improved upon. Among other things things I’d like better camera focus (using an unfamiliar camera, but no excuse for this!). Some of the lighting techniques can also be refined; this includes possible ditching the mannequin to allow the model to have more variety in poses and shape.

That said, tonight DID show that with a little bit of equipment we can team up with our friends even when we can’t be in the same room together.

The team, across the world.

None of us involved tonight know of anything like this having been done before in the light painting community, but if you know of someone who has already done this please let us know and we’ll update this article to give them a respectful shoutout!

See more of my work at hackthelight.com, on Facebook, or on Instagram.

Finally, check out Frodo’s video that talks about his experience. It’s a combination of English and Spanish, and gives some more insight into his side of this collaboration!


About the author: Dan (Chick) Roberts is a software engineer with an artistic passion for technical light painting. He loves to share his ideas and techniques, focusing as much on the ‘how’ and the knowledge-share as the creations themselves. Based in Denver, Colorado, and with a background in applied physics, he and his wife Reagan have traveled to Europe for three educational light painting meetups, with Dan presenting at two of them. He runs Light Painting Lab on Facebook, started the Colorado Light Painting group, and built the PieceOut.com collaborative photomosaic system. You can find more of Dan’s work on his website, Facebook page, and Instagram.

Frodo Álvarez DKL, from Oviedo (Asturias, Spain) is the artist Children Of Darklight. He started light painting in 2009. Light painting became his passion, and is now his way of life. You can find him on Instagram, Facebook, and YouTube.

This post was also published here

Source : Peta Pixel More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.