Steven Galeano Looks To Continue His Rise With Victory Over Marquis Hawthorne

By: Sean Crose There’ll be a fight card this Friday at the 2300 Arena in Philadelphia. New York’s Steven Galeano will be on the card, putting his undefeated record on the line against Marquis Hawthorne in a scheduled six rounder in the welterweight division. Galeano, whose record stands at 7-0, is developing a reputation as a knockout artist, for only one of the 22-year old’s fights have gone the distance. Trained by the respected Jose Guzman, Galeano clearly wants to keep impressing. First, however, he’ll have to get past Hawthorne. "My opponent is extremely experienced and durable," Galeano says. "He isn't stopped on a regular basis and has been in with one undefeated prospect after another. He has upset many upcoming prospects and is known as a veteran spoiler at 140 and 147 pounds. He even has two regional belts at 147 pounds in fights he came in as the underdog." Galeano, though, is nothing if not determined to rise through the ranks of the sport. In fact, he recently helped the one and only Vasyl Lomachenko as the Ukrainian prepared to face Masayoshi Nakatani. Galeano’s own last fight was a third round knockout over Hugo Padilla this past April. "I want to fight two more fights (this year)!" he says of his future after the Hawthorne fight on Friday. "I believe two fights would be good as I steadily increase my level of competition." Galeano also wants to increase the scheduled rounds of his fights. "I look forward to potentially moving up to eight rounds this year, as well," he tells me, "a goal I believe is more than possible." Galeano is nothing if not an interesting study. The City College of New York grad (he studied Public Relations and Journalism) is tough as nails in the ring, but is an easy man to speak with. He’s also an excellent writer – as readers of Boxing Insider, who Galeano writes for, can tell. Yet Galeano is so passionate about boxing, one might think it’s in his DNA. “I’ve been boxing on and off since I was about eight years old,” he’s said. “Around 13 years old, I began to take the sport seriously. That’s when I really began fighting at a furious pace.” The man is certainly continuing to take the sport seriously, fighting on a regular basis and keeping a realistic eye on matters. “You get blinded and think you’re going to knock everybody out,” he once said to me of new fighters with power. “Not everyone is going to go down. You’re going to have to earn it.” If the opportunity arises this Friday night, however, fans can be guaranteed, Galeano will be looking to place another knockout win on his resume. The post Steven Galeano Looks To Continue His Rise With Victory Over Marquis Hawthorne appeared first on BoxingInsider.com.

Steven Galeano Looks To Continue His Rise With Victory Over Marquis Hawthorne

By: Sean Crose

There’ll be a fight card this Friday at the 2300 Arena in Philadelphia. New York’s Steven Galeano will be on the card, putting his undefeated record on the line against Marquis Hawthorne in a scheduled six rounder in the welterweight division. Galeano, whose record stands at 7-0, is developing a reputation as a knockout artist, for only one of the 22-year old’s fights have gone the distance. Trained by the respected Jose Guzman, Galeano clearly wants to keep impressing. First, however, he’ll have to get past Hawthorne.

"My opponent is extremely experienced and durable," Galeano says. "He isn't stopped on a regular basis and has been in with one undefeated prospect after another. He has upset many upcoming prospects and is known as a veteran spoiler at 140 and 147 pounds. He even has two regional belts at 147 pounds in fights he came in as the underdog."

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Galeano, though, is nothing if not determined to rise through the ranks of the sport. In fact, he recently helped the one and only Vasyl Lomachenko as the Ukrainian prepared to face Masayoshi Nakatani. Galeano’s own last fight was a third round knockout over Hugo Padilla this past April. "I want to fight two more fights (this year)!" he says of his future after the Hawthorne fight on Friday. "I believe two fights would be good as I steadily increase my level of competition." Galeano also wants to increase the scheduled rounds of his fights. "I look forward to potentially moving up to eight rounds this year, as well," he tells me, "a goal I believe is more than possible."

Galeano is nothing if not an interesting study. The City College of New York grad (he studied Public Relations and Journalism) is tough as nails in the ring, but is an easy man to speak with. He’s also an excellent writer – as readers of Boxing Insider, who Galeano writes for, can tell. Yet Galeano is so passionate about boxing, one might think it’s in his DNA. “I’ve been boxing on and off since I was about eight years old,” he’s said. “Around 13 years old, I began to take the sport seriously. That’s when I really began fighting at a furious pace.” The man is certainly continuing to take the sport seriously, fighting on a regular basis and keeping a realistic eye on matters.

“You get blinded and
think you’re going to knock everybody out,” he once said to me of new fighters with
power. “Not everyone is going to go down. You’re going to have to earn it.”
If the opportunity arises this Friday night, however, fans can be guaranteed, Galeano
will be looking to place another knockout win on his resume.

The post Steven Galeano Looks To Continue His Rise With Victory Over Marquis Hawthorne appeared first on BoxingInsider.com.

Source : Boxing Insider More   

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Guillermo Rigondeaux: “I’m The Best Pound For Pound Fighter At 122, Nobody Wanted To Fight Me So I Came Down To 118”

By: Hans Themistode For much of his career, Guillermo Rigondeaux has been incredibly consistent. The Cuban native has routinely walked up to the scales and made the super bantamweight limit of 122 pounds. Outside of his failed attempt to move up two weight classes in 2017 against Vasiliy Lomachenko, Rigondeaux has made his name at 122. Yet, no matter how many world titles he congregated, Rigondeaux found it incredibly frustrating to compete in a division where the big fights he craved seldom took place. In an effort to move his career in the right direction, the 40-year-old decided to move down in weight. In his first trip to the bantamweight division, Rigondeaux defeated Liborio Solis via split decision in February of 2020 to win the vacant WBA “Regular” crown. Now, he plans on adding more gold when he takes on WBO titlist, John Riel Casimero. The two are slated to face off in the main event slot on August 14th at Dignity Health Sports Park in Carson, California. While fighting at 118 pounds is still somewhat foreign territory, Rigondeaux explains that he simply got tired of waiting for someone to have the courage to face him in his more natural weight class. “Nobody wanted to fight me at 122,” said Rigondeaux during a virtual presser. “I’m the best pound-for-pound fighter at 122. It just happens that nobody wanted to fight me there. I have the recognition but nobody wanted to fight me so I came down to 118.” Should Rigondeaux pick up the win against Casimero, he’ll set his sights on facing pound-for-pound star, Naoya Inoue, the division's unified champion. The Cuban product has long been intrigued by a matchup that would feature Inoue’s explosive offense and his elusive defense. If a showdown between the pair took place, Rigondeaux is confident that he would walk away with the win. With that said, he does tip his cap to the immensely talented fighter out of Japan. “He’s an excellent champion. Very good fighter, nothing but respect for him.” The post Guillermo Rigondeaux: “I’m The Best Pound For Pound Fighter At 122, Nobody Wanted To Fight Me So I Came Down To 118” appeared first on BoxingInsider.com.

Guillermo Rigondeaux: “I’m The Best Pound For Pound Fighter At 122, Nobody Wanted To Fight Me So I Came Down To 118”

By: Hans Themistode

For much of his career, Guillermo Rigondeaux has been incredibly consistent.

The Cuban native has routinely walked up to the scales and made the super bantamweight limit of 122 pounds. Outside of his failed attempt to move up two weight classes in 2017 against Vasiliy Lomachenko, Rigondeaux has made his name at 122. Yet, no matter how many world titles he congregated, Rigondeaux found it incredibly frustrating to compete in a division where the big fights he craved seldom took place.

In an effort to move his career in the right direction, the 40-year-old decided to move down in weight. In his first trip to the bantamweight division, Rigondeaux defeated Liborio Solis via split decision in February of 2020 to win the vacant WBA “Regular” crown. Now, he plans on adding more gold when he takes on WBO titlist, John Riel Casimero. The two are slated to face off in the main event slot on August 14th at Dignity Health Sports Park in Carson, California.

While fighting at 118 pounds is still somewhat foreign territory, Rigondeaux explains that he simply got tired of waiting for someone to have the courage to face him in his more natural weight class.

“Nobody wanted to fight me at 122,” said Rigondeaux during a virtual presser. “I’m the best pound-for-pound fighter at 122. It just happens that nobody wanted to fight me there. I have the recognition but nobody wanted to fight me so I came down to 118.”

Should Rigondeaux pick up the win against Casimero, he’ll set his sights on facing pound-for-pound star, Naoya Inoue, the division's unified champion. The Cuban product has long been intrigued by a matchup that would feature Inoue’s explosive offense and his elusive defense. If a showdown between the pair took place, Rigondeaux is confident that he would walk away with the win.

With that said, he does tip his cap to the immensely talented fighter out of Japan.

“He’s an excellent champion. Very good fighter, nothing but respect for him.”

The post Guillermo Rigondeaux: “I’m The Best Pound For Pound Fighter At 122, Nobody Wanted To Fight Me So I Came Down To 118” appeared first on BoxingInsider.com.

Source : Boxing Insider More   

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