Stunning Single-Shot FPV Drone Tour of Manchester City’s Etihad Stadium

Manchester City recently topped rival Manchester United to take the Premier League title and to celebrate the internal content team has published this 3-minute and 40-second single-shot first-person-view (FPV) drone video that tours the entire Etihad Stadium. Single-take drone videos are starting to balloon in popularity thanks to the smash success of first-person drone pilot […]

Stunning Single-Shot FPV Drone Tour of Manchester City’s Etihad Stadium

Manchester City recently topped rival Manchester United to take the Premier League title and to celebrate the internal content team has published this 3-minute and 40-second single-shot first-person-view (FPV) drone video that tours the entire Etihad Stadium.

Single-take drone videos are starting to balloon in popularity thanks to the smash success of first-person drone pilot Jay Christiensen. Christiensen stunned the cinematography community with his viral video sensation of a single-take bowling alley video in early March. Since then, he and his team have produced two more videos, one featuring the iconic Los Angeles diner Mel’s Drive-In and the other sponsored by the Mall of America that pays homage to The Mighty Ducks.

“This footage is 100% genuine, no camera tricks, no hidden edits, no CGI – a single take drone shot!” the club writes in a description of the video.

Manchester City’s single-take FPV drone video is pretty close to the level of Christensen’s work and is incredibly impressive in its own right given the amount of space the drone covers and how well it deftly moves through both wide open and tight spaces. The drone covers a huge amount of space both inside and out, which likely pushed the signal strength of the controller and drone to their limits. Similar to Christiensen’s video, the Manchester City content team dubbed audio over the original footage to give viewers something to listen to other than the loud whir of the drone’s propellers, though no people are visible anywhere, which is something that again separates this particular video from the ones that likely inspired it.

Manchester City’s Etihad Stadium was first opened to the public in July of 2002 as the home of the Commonwealth Games before it was converted into Manchester City’s home stadium in 2003. The stadium cost £112 million to build and seats over 55,000 fans.

Manchester City took the Premier League title in 2021 for the fifth time in nine years after rivals Manchester United lost to Leicester City earlier this week. Manchester City’s rise from forgettable outsider to one of the world’s most elite teams over the course of the last 20-plus years is one of the more impressive turnaround examples in the sport.

notes that the soccer club has not yet disclosed the identity of the drone pilot who captured the impressive celebratory footage, though it apparently has promised to post a behind-the-scenes video revealing as much and more in the coming days.

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The Fujifilm X-E4 is the Last To Use X-Trans IV Sensor: Report

The Fujifilm X-E4, announced in January, is the last Fujifilm camera to use the company’s X-Trans IV sensor, according to a new report. The sensor was first introduced on the X-T3 and later found its way into several other cameras over the course of the last three years. According to FujiRumors, Fujifilm will no longer […]

The Fujifilm X-E4 is the Last To Use X-Trans IV Sensor: Report

The Fujifilm X-E4, announced in January, is the last Fujifilm camera to use the company’s X-Trans IV sensor, according to a new report. The sensor was first introduced on the X-T3 and later found its way into several other cameras over the course of the last three years.

, Fujifilm will no longer use the X-Trans IV sensor that is the heart of the Fujifilm X-T3, X-T30, X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 most recently the X-E4. The X-Trans IV is Fujifilm’s fourth-generation backside-illuminated 26.1-megapixel CMOS that the company says integrates the unique X-Trans color filter array to reduce moire and false colors without the need for an optical low pass filter. This combines with its backside-illuminated structure to reduce noise levels and increase image quality.

When the X-Trans IV was first announced as part of the X-T3 release, Fujifilm touted its ability to expand its standard ISO range to ISO 160, which was previously only available via extended ISO. The native ISO range of 160 to 12,800 could then be further expanded to ISO 80 at the new low and ISO 51,200 as the new high.

The X-Trans IV Sensor | Fujifilm

While the sensor has served as the core of several beloved Fujifilm cameras since its 2018 introduction, this new report alleges that the company is set to leave it behind, meaning the X-E4 will be the last Fujifilm camera to use it.

In the interview above published last month, Fujifilm product manager Takashi Ueno notes that Fujifilm’s focus on its XF18mm f/1.4 release was “resolution,” which reports is a hint that higher-megapixel cameras would come in the future. Building on the report that Fujifilm is set to leave the 26.1-megapixel sensor behind, the hope is that an equally functional but higher resolution sensor will come soon.

Unfortunately, such a sensor and a new camera is unlikely to come this year, alleges in a separate report from earlier in the week. According to the rumor, Fujifilm will not release any new X-series cameras for the rest of 2021, which is total turnaround to the company’s bustle of activity early in the year as it announced not only the X-E4, but also the GFX100S and multiple lenses including the aforementioned 18mm f/1.4.

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