That Might Have Been The Most Surreal BRIT Awards Ceremony In Memory

A look back at key moments...There are absolutely no words to sum up the sheer strangeness, the bizarre perversity of walking up to the O2 Arena for the first time in 12 months. After a year of barely emerging from my flat, scarcely interacting with other people, here I was – a negative COVID result from the NHS on my phone – with thousands of other individuals, no doubt sharing a similar vein of anxious excitement. Because make no bones about it: this was perhaps the most surreal ceremony in the history of the BRIT Awards. From host Jack Whitehall’s opening Zoom based skit – an amalgamation of Line Of Duty and Jackie Weaver’s authoritarian lust – to the bizarre Rag’n’Bone Man vs P!NK collaboration which closed the show, the BRIT Awards grappled with COVID limitations and emerged with something just about worked. Female artists were the big winners on the night. Dua Lipa took home two key awards, taking her career-long haul to five. Arlo Parks graced the evening with a subtle, moving performance, before claiming Breakthrough Artist. HAIM won Best International Group, while Best British Group went to female artists for the first time, in the form of a groundbreaking win for Little Mix. - - - - - - In terms of performances, Elton John and Olly Alexander’s dynamic version of ‘It’s A Sin’ was easily the stand out – a larger than life duet that saw the two living their best lives and taking LGBTQ+ representation into the nation’s prime time living rooms. For reasons unknown, though, it was a pre-record – if you were in the arena, all you saw was the huge screens. Coldplay’s somewhat awkward opener saw Chris Martin do the robot on a pontoon, while Dua Lipa’s dazzling medley underlined just how successful her year has been. Headie One led a celebration of UK rap talent, with his short set making room for AJ Tracey, and Young T & Bugsey - the young kings shelled it down, a demonstration of the raw power this generation of artists can conjure. - - - - - - It was a ceremony in which context meant everything. It’s been – and we put this mildly – a traumatic year for a great many people, with the BRITs opening their doors to key workers. The trimmed back audience – a mere 4000 people in the cavernous arena – was overwhelmingly slanted towards those doing such extraordinary work in the NHS. Dua Lipa made her thoughts explicit, dedicating her Best British Female award to healthcare pioneer and nurse Dame Elizabeth Anionwu, before urging the government to enact a pay rise for NHS workers. “It’s all very good to clap for them but we need to pay them,” she said. “I think what we should do is we should all give a massive, massive round of applause and give Boris a message that we all support a fair pay rise for our front line.” Critics online, however, immediately pointed out the Achille’s heel in Dua’s argument: she spent 2020 seemingly jetting from exotic location to exotic location, recently settling down in Mexico, a country that is struggling to contain the pandemic. It’s a layer to the debate that illustrates how profoundly odd and contradictory last night felt; ultimately, no one else thought to demand direct action from those often-hollow government promises. Later dedicating her Album Of The Year award to Folajimi Olubunmi-Adewole – the young man who gave his life attempting to save a woman who had fallen into the river Thames last month – it was pair of classy speeches from Dua, who wore her hair in a Winehouse-esque beehive. - - - - - - 2021 became a year of substantial change for the BRITs. After criticism for its male-heavy winner’s list, the ceremony responded by platforming an international array of female talent: from Taylor Swift to Arlo Parks via HAIM and Little Mix, whose powerful speech spoke of the struggles women face in the British music industry. - - - - - - From a personal perspective, though, what I’ll remember is how curiously bizarre tiny details in our daily lives have become. From struggling to remember how to do small-talk through to climbing an escalator for the first time in what feels like forever, last night seems to be covered in a strange, hallucinatory gauze. A celebration, for sure – but also a profoundly surreal one. - - - - - - Join us on the ad-free creative social network Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold. Buy Clash Magazine

That Might Have Been The Most Surreal BRIT Awards Ceremony In Memory
A look back at key moments...

There are absolutely no words to sum up the sheer strangeness, the bizarre perversity of walking up to the O2 Arena for the first time in 12 months. After a year of barely emerging from my flat, scarcely interacting with other people, here I was – a negative COVID result from the NHS on my phone – with thousands of other individuals, no doubt sharing a similar vein of anxious excitement.

Because make no bones about it: this was perhaps the most surreal ceremony in the history of the BRIT Awards. From host Jack Whitehall’s opening – an amalgamation of Line Of Duty and Jackie Weaver’s authoritarian lust – to the bizarre Rag’n’Bone Man vs P!NK collaboration which closed the show, the BRIT Awards grappled with COVID limitations and emerged with something just about worked.

Female artists were the big winners on the night. Dua Lipa took home two key awards, taking her career-long haul to five. Arlo Parks graced the evening with a subtle, moving performance, before claiming Breakthrough Artist. HAIM won Best International Group, while Best British Group went to female artists for the first time, in the form of a groundbreaking win for Little Mix.

- - -

- - -

In terms of performances, Elton John and Olly Alexander’s dynamic version of ‘It’s A Sin’ was – a larger than life duet that saw the two living their best lives and taking LGBTQ+ representation into the nation’s prime time living rooms. For reasons unknown, though, it was a pre-record – if you were in the arena, all you saw was the huge screens. Coldplay’s somewhat awkward opener saw Chris Martin do the robot on a pontoon, while Dua Lipa’s dazzling medley underlined just how successful her year has been.

Headie One led a celebration of UK rap talent, with his short set making room for AJ Tracey, and Young T & Bugsey - the young kings shelled it down, a demonstration of the raw power this generation of artists can conjure.

- - -

- - -

It was a ceremony in which context meant everything. It’s been – and we put this mildly – a traumatic year for a great many people, with the BRITs opening their doors to key workers. The trimmed back audience – a mere 4000 people in the cavernous arena – was overwhelmingly slanted towards those doing such extraordinary work in the NHS.

Dua Lipa made her thoughts explicit, dedicating her Best British Female award to healthcare pioneer and nurse , before urging the government to enact a pay rise for NHS workers. “It’s all very good to clap for them but we need to pay them,” she said. “I think what we should do is we should all give a massive, massive round of applause and give Boris a message that we all support a fair pay rise for our front line.”

Critics online, however, immediately pointed out the Achille’s heel in Dua’s argument: she spent 2020 seemingly , recently settling down in Mexico, a country that is struggling to contain the pandemic. It’s a layer to the debate that illustrates how profoundly odd and contradictory last night felt; ultimately, no one else thought to demand direct action from those often-hollow government promises.

Later dedicating her Album Of The Year award to Folajimi Olubunmi-Adewole – the young man who gave his life attempting to save a woman who had fallen into the river Thames last month – it was pair of classy speeches from Dua, who wore her hair in a Winehouse-esque beehive.

- - -

- - -

2021 became a year of substantial change for the BRITs. After criticism for , the ceremony responded by platforming an international array of female talent: from Taylor Swift to Arlo Parks via HAIM and Little Mix, whose powerful speech spoke of the struggles women face in the British music industry.

- - -

- - -

From a personal perspective, though, what I’ll remember is how curiously bizarre tiny details in our daily lives have become. From struggling to remember how to do small-talk through to climbing an escalator for the first time in what feels like forever, last night seems to be covered in a strange, hallucinatory gauze. A celebration, for sure – but also a profoundly surreal one.

- - -

- - -

Join us on the ad-free creative social network , as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots.

Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

Buy Clash Magazine

Source : Clash Music More   

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The Best Dressed At The 2021 Brit Awards

British designers win big...Definitively the biggest night in British music, the Brit Awards is a welcome return to the reguarly scheduled (albiet still socially distanced) award season. This year, acts including Harry Styles, Dua Lipa, HAIM, Griff, Oliiva Rodrgio Pa Salieu and Celeste were turning heads both on and off stage.  The night truly belonged to British designers, with Brit nominee and Clash cover star Celeste in the ultimate party dress from Ashley WIlliams, Brit rising star winner Griff looking ethereal in custom Susan Fang, Dua Lipa and Jade Thirwall both sporting Vivienne Westwood, and Perrie Edwards debuting her baby bump in an a cut-out David Koma gown. See Clash's best-dressed Brit Awards attendees here.   Dua Lipa in custom Vivienne Westwood HAIM all in The Row Harry Styles in Gucci Griff in Susan Fang Olivia Rodrigo in Dior Pa Salieu in Dior Men's Arlo Parks Little Mix, (L-R) Leigh-Anne Pinnock in Maison Margiela, Jade Thirwall in Vivienne Westwood, Perrie Edwards in David Koma Taylor Swift in Miu Miu Lianne La Havas in Schiaparelli Headie One in Louis Vuitton AJ Tracey in Dior Men's Celeste in Ashley Williams Olivia Rodrigo performing in Dior Dua Lipa performing in custom Vivienne Westwood     - - - Join us on the ad-free creative social network Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold. Buy Clash Magazine

The Best Dressed At The 2021 Brit Awards
British designers win big...

Definitively the biggest night in British music, the Brit Awards is a welcome return to the reguarly scheduled (albiet still socially distanced) award season. This year, acts including Harry Styles, Dua Lipa, HAIM, Griff, Oliiva Rodrgio Pa Salieu and Celeste were turning heads both on and off stage. 

The night truly belonged to British designers, with Brit nominee and Clash cover star Celeste in the ultimate party dress from Ashley WIlliams, Brit rising star winner Griff looking ethereal in custom Susan Fang, Dua Lipa and Jade Thirwall both sporting Vivienne Westwood, and Perrie Edwards debuting her baby bump in an a cut-out David Koma gown.

See Clash's best-dressed Brit Awards attendees here.

 

Dua Lipa in custom Vivienne Westwood

HAIM all in The Row

Harry Styles in Gucci

Griff in Susan Fang

Olivia Rodrigo in Dior

Pa Salieu in Dior Men's

Arlo Parks

Little Mix, (L-R) Leigh-Anne Pinnock in Maison Margiela, Jade Thirwall in Vivienne Westwood, Perrie Edwards in David Koma

Taylor Swift in Miu Miu

Lianne La Havas in Schiaparelli

Headie One in Louis Vuitton

AJ Tracey in Dior Men's

Celeste in Ashley Williams

Olivia Rodrigo performing in Dior

 

 

- - -

Join us on the ad-free creative social network , as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots.

Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

Buy Clash Magazine

Source : Clash Music More   

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